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biology

# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Musings from Cloud Cuckoo Land Dr Karen Park delivers a Creative Multilingualism and TORCH Bitesize talk as part of Linguamania Karen Park 21 Feb 2017
2 'Light' Part 3 - How does sunlight damage DNA? Once we've received our genetic make-up from our parents our genomes are stable, right? What causes mutations in our DNA as we live and grow, and how do our cells repair damage? Catherine Green 03 Aug 2016
3 'Land, Sea and Air' Part 3 - What happens when we fly Oxygen levels are slightly lower when you fly on commercial airlines, so what effects does this have on people? Can it cause any problems? Thomas Smith 17 Jun 2016
4 'Land, Sea and Air' Part 2 - The state of the oceans What's in the deep ocean? And how can we study these remote and extreme ecosystems? And how is climate change affecting ocean ecosystems? Alex Rogers 10 Jun 2016
5 Creative Commons From information to structure Dr Brian Marsden aims to make structural and chemical biology data accessible to non-experts, by providing computational resources including data management, sample tracking, in silico modelling support plus provision of public access to SGC data. Brian Marsden 02 Jun 2016
6 Creative Commons From information to structure Dr Brian Marsden aims to make structural and chemical biology data accessible to non-experts, by providing computational resources including data management, sample tracking, in silico modelling support plus provision of public access to SGC data. Brian Marsden 02 Jun 2016
7 'Learning' part 2 - Stimulating learning Can a little electrical stimulation help people learn quicker? And how would technology that does this be used? And why would you want to use this over medicines? Roi Cohen Kadosh 13 May 2016
8 Bioinformatics at the heart of biology and genomics medicine The Ninth annual Florence Nightingale Lecture, given by Professor Dame Janet Thornton, European Bioinformatics Institute, Cambridge. Held on Thursday 21st April 2016. Dame Janet Thornton 27 Apr 2016
9 'Relationships' part 2 - New fathers How do new fathers form relationships with their children? What is the unique role of a father? What do they contribute to the development of their children? What is male post-natal depression? Anna Machin 22 Apr 2016
10 What Makes You Tick? How do you know when it's time to wake up or go to sleep? More powerful than any alarm are your circadian rhythms. Christopher James-Harvey, Stuart Peirson, Russell Foster 12 Apr 2016
11 Shedding Light on the Situation Light is more than just light bulbs and sunshine! Researchers at the University of Oxford use different types of light to learn more about all sorts of interesting things. Jena Meinecke, Chris Rennick, Brianna Heazlewood, Clarence Yapp 12 Apr 2016
12 'Relationships' part 1 - People and plants: balancing conservation and commerce How can working with people to understand how they use their local plants be used to protect them when industry moves in? How do we find and conserve areas of high 'bioquality'? William Hawthorne 12 Apr 2016
13 Fine Tuning in Biology Ard Louis in conversation with George Ellis. Part three - Fine Tuning in Biology. George Ellis, Ard Louis 12 Apr 2016
14 'Fat knowledge', epigenetics and the enchantment of relational biology An Anthropology Departmental Seminar presented by Megan Warin (Adelaide) on the ways in which obesity is understood, embodied and enacted, 16 October 2015 Megan Warin 14 Mar 2016
15 'Killers' part 3 - Mental illness and violence Forensic psychiatry can help us understand the causes and best treatments for mentally disordered offenders inside and outside of the prison system Seena Fazel 23 Feb 2016
16 Creative Commons Carrots, spiders and red salt – a fascination with light capture in biology Using physics, chemistry and biology, the fascination with light capture in nature will be explained in a multi-coloured and animated well – prepare for six-eyed spiders, purple carrots and red salt. Anthony Watts 15 Dec 2015
17 'Clues' part 3 - Picking apart the genetics of speech and language disorders How do you start to pick apart speech at the genetic level? Dr Dianne Newbury explains what Specific Language Impairment is and how her research is unravelling a pretty complicated picture. Dianne Newbury 01 Dec 2015
18 Creative Commons The Heart and the Head, Part 5 Daniel Bulte, from the Department of Oncology, speaks about what happens when they discover an ‘incidental finding’. Daniel Bulte 16 Nov 2015
19 Creative Commons The Heart and the Head, Part 4 Portia Westall, from the Donnelly group at the WTCHG, speaks about how she thinks about music when working on DNA sequences. Portia Westall 16 Nov 2015
20 Creative Commons The Heart and the Head, Part 3 Erwan Atcheson, from the Jenner Institute, speaks about his time studying parasitic worms, and the worries that come with it. Erwan Atcheson 16 Nov 2015
21 Creative Commons The Heart and the Head, Part 2 Anna Fowler, from the Lunter group at the WTCHG, speaks about how the patterns around a close-call in the desert makes her think about her work. Anna Fowler 16 Nov 2015
22 Creative Commons The Heart and the Head, Part 1 Irina Pulyakhina, from the Julian Knight group at the WTCHG, speaks about her time helping a Masters student through an important presentation. Irina Pulyakhina 16 Nov 2015
23 'Clues' part 2 - Watching penguins How do you understand how large populations of penguins on Antarctica change? And how can you use this information to protect penguins? Tom Hart 16 Nov 2015
24 Creative Commons A Fascination with Vision: What nature can teach us Professor Anthony Watts, C W Maplethorpe Fellow in Biological Sciences delivers a very interesting lecture entitled 'A Fascination with Vision: What nature can teach us'. Anthony Watts 12 Nov 2015
25 Seeing the Invisible in Health and Disease How our ability to now see the invisible is central to research in biology – from infectious disease to cancer and Alzheimers. Keith Gull 11 Jun 2015
26 Suffering History: Phenomenology at the Intersection of Disease and Illness A presentation by Austin Argentieri. Austin Argentieri 10 Jun 2015
27 The Avian Genome Explosion The ASC Trinity Term Lecture delivered by Professor Tom Gilbert, exploring the analysis of bird genomes and evolution. Tom Gilbert 27 May 2015
28 'Artificial Intelligence' part 2 - How to create machines that learn Professor Nando de Freitas explains that understanding how our brains work has helped us create machines that learn, and how these learning machines can be put to completing different tasks. Nando de Freitas 19 May 2015
29 Give us a hand Oxford Sparks explore what chirality is. Jo Dunkley, Alain Goriely, Robert Llewellyn 18 May 2015
30 'Artificial Intelligence' part 1 - Using artificial intelligence to spot patterns Professor Stephen Roberts explains how machines, whose job it is simply to learn, can help researchers spot scientific needles in data haystacks, which will help us solve some grand challenges. Stephen Roberts 15 Apr 2015
31 Creative Commons The history of the obesity epidemic Thorkild Sørensen (University of Copenhagen) gives a talk for the UBVO seminar series on 27th November 2009 Thorkild Sørensen 01 Feb 2015
32 Creative Commons Behavioral biology and obesity Trent Smith (Washington State University) gives a talk for the UBVO seminar series on 27th Novmber 2009 Trent Smith 01 Feb 2015
33 Creative Commons Rodent Models of Obesity-Reductionist Approaches to Understanding the Basis of a Complex Human Trait Neil Docherty, University College Dublin, gives a talk for the Michaelmas Term UBVO Seminar Series. Neil Docherty 17 Dec 2014
34 Creative Commons Antidepressants, neurobiology and therapeutics Professor Phil Cowen discusses the neurobiological basis of antidepressants and future treatment mechanisms Phil Cowen 08 Dec 2014
35 Part 2: The history of structural biology Understanding the function of a protein is an important step in finding out why the body succumbs to disease – but how do scientists find these proteins and figure out how they work? Jonathan Webb 05 Nov 2014
36 Part 1: The Building Blocks of Life Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells but it doesn’t matter how closely you look, you still won’t see them. Jonathan Webb 28 Oct 2014
37 "Matters of Scale" - Complete Episode The issues of scale are investigated – from how properties change at very small scales, to the vastness of the Universe. Includes parts 1, 2 and 3. Pedro Ferreira, Alan Barr, Sylvia MacLain, Sonia Trigueros 09 Oct 2014
38 "Matters of Scale" Part 3 - Nanomedicine Dr Sonia Trigueros explains how she is using nanotechnologies to create targeted drug delivery systems. Chemotherapy is a particularly harmful treatment, with patients losing their hair and suffering from infections due to damage to their immune systems. Sonia Trigueros, Chris Lintott 08 Oct 2014
39 "Matters of Scale" Part 2 - Biology and the Problem with Scale Dr Sylvia MacLain talks about how water creates a problem when researching biology. Structures can be studied when they are in solid form, but approximately 60% of our bodies are made of water. Sylvia MacLain, Chris Lintott 08 Oct 2014
40 Microbes matter: metabolism and chronic disease in contemporary biomedicine Nadine Levin, Exeter University, gives a talk for the UBVO seminar series Nadine Levin 30 Jun 2014
41 Healthcare 2030: Oxford and the Value of Human Health Panel discussion looking at healthcare in the future as part of the inaugural Oxford Alumni Weekend in Asia held in in Hong Kong. Chas Bountra, Jonathan Flint, Nick Rawlins 23 Jun 2014
42 Creative Commons James D Murray, Reflections of a life in Academia, in conversation with Phillip Maini Jim Murray is one of the leading mathematical biologists of our times. In this wide-ranging interview Jim talks about his career, the range of his work, his successes and failures and his hopes and expectations for the future of mathematical biology. James D Murray, Phillip Maini 02 Apr 2014
43 Why there are no three-headed monsters, resolving some problems with brain tumours, divorce prediction and how to save marriages Professor James D Murray, Professor Emeritus of Mathematical Biology, University of Oxford & Senior Scholar, Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, gives the annual Hooke Lecture. James D Murray 21 Mar 2014
44 Boxing Clever, or Just Boxed In?: Developing Metal Complexes for Biological Imaging Professor Stephen Faulkner, Tutorial Fellow at Keble College, delivers the Richardson Lecture, entitled "Boxing Clever, or Just Boxed In? Developing Metal Complexes for Biological Imaging“. Stephen Faulkner 28 Feb 2014
45 Conclusion: How Chemistry Research Impacts Human Health Wrapping up this series on human health, Dr Emily Flashman talks about her work studying the mechanisms by which our bodies respond to low levels of oxygen. Emily Flashman 19 Jul 2013
46 Lasers, Cell Membranes, and the Basis of Life Being a chemist doesn't have to mean giving up on biology and physics. Mark Wallace, Matt Baker 19 Jul 2013
47 Synthesizing Anti-Cancer Drugs from Nature Chemicals found in nature can have incredibly useful functionality, including anti-malarial and anti-cancer properties. However, they are usually found in small amounts. Chris Jones 19 Jul 2013
48 3D Printing and The Structure of Proteins Using 3D printed molecules, Rok Sekirnik, a DPhil student in the emerging field of chemical biology, shows how protein structures can be determined in some of the Department's most distinctive looking labs. Rok Sekirnik 19 Jul 2013
49 Epigenetics and New Anti-Cancer Treatments At the interface of chemistry, biology, and medicine, Cyrille Thinnes, a DPhil student in the Schofield Group, shares his research into the next generation of anti-cancer treatments. Cyrille Thinnes 19 Jul 2013
50 Introduction: How Chemistry Research Impacts Human Health To truly understand disease, we need to understand the underlying chemical processes that direct human biology. Dr Emily Flashman introduces some of the research in the Department of Chemistry that will help improve our health in future. Emily Flashman 19 Jul 2013
51 Organisms Reading and Reference list Reading and Reference list for Organisms lecture series. Tim Walker 09 May 2013
52 Creative Commons Organisms Lecture 4: The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation 2020 Fourth and final lecture in Professor Tim Walker's Organisms series in which he looks at how we can conserve the world's vital plants on a global scale. Tim Walker 07 May 2013
53 Creative Commons Organisms Lecture 3: What have Plants done for us? Third lecture in Professor Tim Walker's Organisms lecture series in which he looks at what plants have contributed to human existence. Tim Walker 07 May 2013
54 Creative Commons Organisms Lecture 2: Biological Pollination Second lecture in Professor Tim Walker's Organisms lecture series in which he looks at biological pollination - how bees and other insects pollinate plants. Tim Walker 07 May 2013
55 Creative Commons Organisms Lecture 1: Its all about seeds First lecture in Professor Tim Walker's Organisms lecture series in which he looks at seeds and their imporance to organisms. Tim Walker 07 May 2013
56 Creative Commons Phytoplankton: the Ocean's Microscopic Flora The President of St John's College, Professor Maggie Snowling, in conversation with Dr Heather Bowman, a Fellow in Biological Sciences at St John's. They discuss Heather's research work as a biological oceanographer. Heather Bouman, Maggie Snowling 22 Apr 2013
57 Creative Commons Body Clocks, Sleep and Light Russell Foster explains the role of light in regulating our bodies and discusses the implications of today's almost constant exposure to light. Russell Foster 08 Apr 2013
58 Creative Commons Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry at Oxford: a guide for prospective undergraduate students This light-hearted talk gives you the chance to hear three admissions tutors discuss what you can expect from their courses, and what the tutors are looking for when they select students. Martin Speight, Mark Wormald, Nick Green 04 Mar 2013
59 Plants and People: Cotton, Sugar and Quinine A lecture given by Timothy Walker to biology undergraduates as part of the Plants and People Course in which the close relationship between these three plants and human history are examined. Timothy Walker 26 Feb 2013
60 Plant conservation 4: there is no technical obstacle to the conservation of every plant species. The fourth in a series of four lectures on the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) given to third year biology undergraduates. This lecture looks at how, despite recent advances, there are still gaps in our knowledge about plant conservation. Timothy Walker 20 Feb 2013
61 Plant Conservation 3: repairing the damage The third in a series of four lectures on the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) given to third year biology undergraduates. This lecture looks at how we can restore plant communities to biological health. Timothy Walker 20 Feb 2013
62 Plant Conservation 2: protecting plant species The second in a series of four lectures on the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) given to third year biology undergraduates. This lecture looks at how threatened species can be protected. Timothy Walker 20 Feb 2013
63 Plant Conservation 1: conservation conventions, strategies and policies First in a series of four lectures on the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation (GSPC) given to third year biology undergraduates. This lecture looks at the events leading to the creation of the GSPC. Timothy Walker 20 Feb 2013
64 Creative Commons Manipulating plant genes - how do you actually do it? We often hear in the news about GM (Genetic Modification or Manipulation) but what does it actually involve? Liam Dolan 10 Jan 2012
65 Creative Commons Plants in a chemical world Plants are able to metabolise a surprisingly diverse range of synthetic chemicals including pesticides and pollutants. Rob Edwards 09 Jan 2012
66 Creative Commons Selling Organs Everyday people die in hospitals because there aren't enough organs available for transplant. In most countries of the world - though not all - it is illegal to sell organs. Tim Lewens 01 Nov 2011
67 Creative Commons New Cells for Old Members: The Science of Stem Cells Dr Francis Szele gives a talk for the Oxford Alumni Weekend on Stem Cell science and looks at how they could be used in repairing brain disease and injuries. Francis Szele 11 Oct 2011
68 Creative Commons Status Quo Bias Suppose a genetic engineering breakthrough made it simple, safe and cheap to increase people's intelligence. Nick Bostrom 01 Aug 2011
69 Medical Anthropology at Oxford: Oxford's 'Two Bodies' in Medical Anthropology This presentation by Dr Caroline Potter (ISCA, Oxford) focuses on how Oxford's Medicial Anthropology bridges the biological and social divide. It was delivered at the 10 Years at the Intersections conference in June 2011. Caroline Potter 25 Jul 2011
70 Creative Commons Designer Babies The term 'designer baby' is usually used in a pejorative sense - to conjure up some dystopian Brave New World. There are already ways to affect what kind of children you have - most obviously by choosing the partner to have them with. Julian Savulescu 31 May 2011
71 Systems Science and Inequalities in Obesity in England - Findings from an Agent-Based Model Abdulrahman El-Sayid, DPhil Student, British Heart Foundation, Oxford, gives a talk for the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) seminar series. Abdulrahman El-Sayid 27 May 2011
72 Fizzyology: genetics, metabolic effects health outcomes and politics of high sugar Michael Goran gives a talk for the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) seminar series. Michael Goran 06 Apr 2011
73 The phenomenology of binge eating in anorexia and bulimia Karin Eli, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, University of Oxford, gives a talk for the UBVO seminar series. Karin Eli 06 Apr 2011
74 Digital image capture in public health surveillance for physical activity and food behaviour assessment Paul Kelly and Aiden Doherty give a talk for the UBVO seminar series. Paul Kelly, Aiden Doherty 06 Apr 2011
75 Affective hunger: bread and famine in ethiopian christian spirituality Cressida Marcus gives a talk for the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) seminar series. Cressida Marcus 06 Apr 2011
76 Why do we dislike obese people? Kerry O'Brien, Senior lecturer, University of Manchester and Monash University, gives a talk for the Unit for Biocultural Variation and Obesity (UBVO) seminar series. Kerry O'Brien 06 Apr 2011
77 Insights into the Development of Wellbeing in the Very Long Run Nikola Koepke gives a talk for the UBVO seminar series entitled: Insights into the Development of Wellbeing in the Very Long Run: Status of Pe-Historic and Historic Europe. Nikola Koepke 27 Jul 2010
78 Sleep in the Global 24/7 Society Professor Foster gives a talk on some of the causes and consequences of sleep disruption and explores how our increasingly sleep deprived society is have unanticipated consequences for out physical and mental health. Russell Foster 24 Aug 2009
79 Creative Commons Pheromones: what animals (including humans) say with smell Tristram Wyatt gives a talk on 'The Science of Smell' - Pheromones, outlining their discovery, their chemistry and how animals (and humans) interact through smell. Part of the 2008 Oxford Alumni Weekend. Tristram Wyatt 23 Jun 2009
80 The Kadoorie Study in China Zhengming Chen, Professor of Epidemiology, gives a talk on the Kadoorie Biobank study, a joint Chinese and British study looking at the lifestyles of 500,000 people and presents some of the findings that can be used to influence public health policy. Zhengming Chen 29 Apr 2009