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# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Stomach is the Monarch A song about how Victorians saw the conversation between the gut and mood, based on research by Dr Emilie Taylor-Brown at the University of Oxford Emilie Taylor-Brown 16 Oct 2017
2 What Does Philosophy Have to Do with Neuroscience? When you examine the brain, you can learn a lot and see chemical interactions, but you cannot find anything about the first-person nature of things we experience as humans, such as colours and pain. Paul Skokowski 03 Apr 2017
3 The Microbiome and the Brain An interview with Professor Phil Burnet, who discusses his research into the influence of the gut microbiome on brain health. He talks about novel findings, potential future work, and takes questions from trainee psychiatrists and researchers. Phil Burnet 30 Jan 2017
4 Shakespeare as Observer and Psychologist – Professor Paul Matthews (Fellow by Special Election, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford; Edmond and Lily Safra Chair and Head of Brain Sciences, Imperial College London) Paul focuses on some of the questions that Shakespeare was asking about the mind, and how the same sorts of issues are approached now by neuroscientists. Paul Matthews 12 Dec 2016
5 Shakespeare, Mind and World – Dr Tom MacFaul (Lecturer in English, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford) Tom discusses how Shakespeare’s age thought about thinking. In particular, he looks at the transformative power of thought and the idea in some of Shakespeare’s works that the mind is free to create its own world. Tom MacFaul 12 Dec 2016
6 Creative Commons Going Viral Viruses have been a threat to humanity for as long as we have existed. As we make progress in the fight against them, can we also learn to use their tricks to our own advantage Natalie Doig, Sandy Douglas, Peter Magill, Mary Warrell 23 Sep 2016
7 Creative Commons And all this time it dwells behind the door Annie Freud, the award-winning poet and artist, will talk about where her poems come from, her development as an artist and writer, and the relationship between her poems and paintings. Annie Freud, Sowon Park 04 Jul 2016
8 The tempos of perception in the human brain NDCN departmental seminar Kia Nobre 05 Jan 2016
9 You've Got a Nerve In the early 1900s, Charles Sherrington examined microscope slides of muscles, nerves, the spine and the brain and traced the connections between them building a picture of how muscles are controlled. Researchers today still use principles he established. Jo Dunkley, Robert Llewellyn 05 Mar 2015
10 A spin around the brain Take a journey around the brain with Ossie from Oxford Sparks. Find out more and read about the science behind the animation at www.oxfordsparks.net/mri. Ruby Wax 05 Mar 2015
11 Education, language and the social brain A public seminar from the Department of Education, given by Dr Neil Mercer, University of Cambridge. Neil Mercer 02 Mar 2015
12 What Maths Really Does: From modelling the brain to modelling the climate How has mathematics emerged over recent decades as the engine behind 21st century science? Alain Goriely looks at this question and more. Alain Goriely 04 Dec 2014
13 What Maths Really Does: From modelling the brain to modelling the climate How has mathematics emerged over recent decades as the engine behind 21st century science? Alain Goriely looks at this question and more. Alain Goriely 06 Oct 2014
14 Creative Commons Traumatic Brain Disease in the Military: Past, Present and Future A review of the fascinating 100 year history of traumatic brain injury in the military and, in particular, its long-term consequences. Daniel Perl 10 Sep 2014
15 Creative Commons Was Schubert a musical brain? Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Raymond Tallis 07 May 2014
16 Creative Commons Spiders, yes, but why cats? Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Iain McGilchrist 07 May 2014
17 Creative Commons Am I my mind? Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Iain McGilchrist 07 May 2014
18 Creative Commons Am I my brain? Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ‘neuromania’. He shows why it is attractive, but al Raymond Tallis 07 May 2014
19 Creative Commons Suicide Assessment Professor Hawton is a world leading expert in suicide research. He has written books on the subject and has contributed to UK policy in this area. He speaks to Dr Daniel Maughan about this controversial area of psychiatric research. Keith Hawton 25 Mar 2014
20 Creative Commons A Successful Strategy for Building Normal Brains - Nature or Nurture? Dr Simon Butt (Keble), Fellow and Tutor in Neuroscience, gives a talk for the Oxford Alumni Weekend. Simon Butt 07 Oct 2013
21 Creative Commons Creativity Lecture 8: Creativity as a neuroscientific mystery Prof. Margaret Boden (Philosophy, Sussex) delivers a lecture as part of the Keble College Creativity series. Margaret Boden 28 May 2012
22 Creativity Lecture 5: The Neuroscience of Creativity Professor Susan Greenfield explains how neuroscience can make innovative contributions to creativity by offering a perspective at the level of the physical brain. Susan Greenfield 06 Feb 2012
23 Creative Commons Understanding human pain, suffering and relief through brain imaging Professor Irene Tracey talks about her research into pain through using brain imaging technology to see exactly how the brain is affected by pain while discussing its implications to how we understand pain in society. Irene Tracey 09 Nov 2009
24 Creative Commons Understanding human pain, suffering and relief through brain imaging Using examples from her research, Professor Tracey illustrates some of the exciting developments in brain imaging -seeing exactly how the brain is affected by its environment-and discusses how this research impacts on modern medicine, law and society. Irene Tracey 28 Oct 2009
25 Gero Miesenboeck on Fruit Flies and Neuroscience In this podcast, Professor Gero Miesenboeck begins with a discussion of DNA and neuroscience, and then talks about his experiments on the brain of the fruit fly. Gero Miesenboeck, Oliver Lewis 13 Sep 2008
26 Gero Miesenboeck on Fruit Flies and Neuroscience In this podcast, Professor Gero Miesenboeck begins with a discussion of DNA and neuroscience, and then talks about his experiments on the brain of the fruit fly. Gero Miesenboeck, Oliver Lewis 13 Sep 2008