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disease

# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Maths v Disease - Julia Gog Can mathematics really help us in our fight against infectious disease? Join Julia Gog as we explore exciting current research areas where mathematics is being used to study pandemics, viruses and everything in between. Julia Gog 13 Nov 2017
2 Creative Commons Ebola Emergence is Predictable This talk was given by Dr Peter Walsh (University of Cambridge) at the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine on 3 November 2016/ Peter Walsh 15 Sep 2017
3 Is my bacon sandwich really going to kill me? Statistician Dr Jennifer Rogers discusses the numbers linked to processed meat and bowel cancer. Jennifer Rogers 25 Oct 2016
4 Creative Commons Killing and dying This lecture asks what weapons people owned in Henry VIII's England and whether they knew how to use them, some of its evidence drawn from coroners' inquests into accidents with bows, guns and swords. Steven Gunn 12 Oct 2016
5 'Land, Sea and Air' Part 3 - What happens when we fly Oxygen levels are slightly lower when you fly on commercial airlines, so what effects does this have on people? Can it cause any problems? Thomas Smith 17 Jun 2016
6 Creative Commons Maternal capital and offspring development Jonathan Wells (UCL Institute of Child Health) presents an intergenerational perspective on the development origins of health and disease. A medical anthropology seminar given on 29 February 2016. Jonathan Wells 08 Jun 2016
7 Creative Commons Malaria laboratory at MORU Dr Kesinee Chotivanich's laboratory provides facilities and resources to researchers, students, and collaborators who are interested in tropical diseases, with the aim to improve patients’ care. Kesinee Chotivanich 02 Jun 2016
8 Malaria laboratory at MORU Dr Kesinee Chotivanich's laboratory provides facilities and resources to researchers, students, and collaborators who are interested in tropical diseases, with the aim to improve patients’ care. Kesinee Chotivanich 02 Jun 2016
9 How computers have changed the way we do physics - Structure in complex systems The power of available computers has now grown exponentially for many decades. The ability to discover numerically the implications of equations and models has opened our eyes to previously hidden aspects of physics. Mark Newman 11 Feb 2016
10 Creative Commons The Evolution of the Genome Computational and stastistical methods help us understand evolution as well as genetic disease. Gerton Lunter 02 Dec 2015
11 The Evolution of the Genome Computational and stastistical methods help us understand evolution as well as genetic disease. Gerton Lunter 02 Dec 2015
12 Creative Commons Medical science needs you! Human clinical trials Clinical trials for vaccines: how they work and what's involved for volunteers. Sean Elias, Natalie Lella 19 Oct 2015
13 Creative Commons How clean is a clean room? Human vaccine manufacture The stringent processes that ensure new vaccines are clinic-ready Sean Elias, Emma Bolan 19 Oct 2015
14 Creative Commons Maladies and mice. Pre-clinical vaccine development Approaches used to target particularly tricky diseases to treat, such as malaria, HIV, Flu and TB. Sean Elias, Lynda Coughlan, Rachel Tanner 19 Oct 2015
15 Creative Commons Why vaccinate? The history and science of vaccination Vaccine origins, science behind how vaccines work and how outbreaks of diseases can occur if vaccination levels drop too low. Sean Elias 19 Oct 2015
16 Ecology of undernutrition and infection Professor Stanley Ulijaszek (University of Oxford) presents a lecture on undernutrition and infection (14 November 2014) Stanley Ulijaszek 07 May 2015
17 Biocultural approaches to Type 2 diabetes Stanley Ulijaszek (University of Oxford) presents a lecture on Type 2 diabetes from the Disease Ecology Lecture series (28 November 2014) Stanley Ulijaszek 07 May 2015
18 Creative Commons New strategies for disease prevention and management from infancy to old age Professor Terry Dwyer, Executive Director, The George Institute for Global Health and Dr Kazem Rahimi, Deputy Director, The George Institute for Global Health. Kazem Rahimi, Terry Dwyer 17 Feb 2015
19 Diagnosis, Treatment and Disease Epidemiology - The Trefoil Knot The Newton Abraham Lecture 2014, delivered by Professor Piero Olliaro, Newton Abraham Visiting Professor, University of Oxford. Piero Olliaro 16 Dec 2014
20 "There's no place like home" Part 2 - The People of the British Isles Bruce Winney describes the influx of humans to the British Isles, including the Romans, Anglo Saxons and Vikings. By comparing and contrasting the genetic make-up of patients, researchers can explore how genetics can influence disease. Bruce Winney 15 Dec 2014
21 Why is Oxford Determined to Change the Way We Discover New Medicines? Chas Bountra, a popular speaker at the recent Meeting Minds: Alumni Weekend in Asia, will explain how Oxford is creating a new ecosystem for drug discovery. Chas Bountra 07 Oct 2014
22 Creative Commons FMR 45 Health crises and migration Individual and collective responses to health crises contribute to an orderly public health response that most times precludes the need for large-scale displacements. Michael Edelstein, David Heymann, Khalid Koser 07 Apr 2014
23 Creative Commons Political ecology of disease This lecture by Professor Stanley Ulijaszek of ISCA, the University of Oxford, is part of the Disease Ecology series and was delivered on 22 November 2013 Stanley Ulijaszek 03 Feb 2014
24 Creative Commons Disease transitions This lecture by Professor Stanley Ulijaszek of ISCA, the University of Oxford, is part of the Disease Ecology series and was presented on 13 November 2013. Stanley Ulijaszek 03 Feb 2014
25 Fighting the World's Fight: Against Poverty Mr David Ferreira, Mr Nick Kristof and Dr Mark Suzman discuss fighting poverty at the Rhodes House 110th Anniversary event. David Ferreira, Nick Kristof, Mark Suzman 29 Oct 2013
26 Creative Commons Smallpox in poetry Smallpox was rife in the eighteenth century, leaving its mark both on its sufferers, and on the literature of the period. This podcast explores its history in verse. Elizabeth Atkinson 16 Sep 2013
27 Conclusion: How Chemistry Research Impacts Human Health Wrapping up this series on human health, Dr Emily Flashman talks about her work studying the mechanisms by which our bodies respond to low levels of oxygen. Emily Flashman 19 Jul 2013
28 Practical Uses of NMR: Exploring Enzymes to Fight Disease The mutant enzymes that cause disease in our bodies can be combated by chemical inhibitors if we understand how these molecules are interacting. Ivanhoe Leung 19 Jul 2013
29 Synthesizing Anti-Cancer Drugs from Nature Chemicals found in nature can have incredibly useful functionality, including anti-malarial and anti-cancer properties. However, they are usually found in small amounts. Chris Jones 19 Jul 2013
30 3D Printing and The Structure of Proteins Using 3D printed molecules, Rok Sekirnik, a DPhil student in the emerging field of chemical biology, shows how protein structures can be determined in some of the Department's most distinctive looking labs. Rok Sekirnik 19 Jul 2013
31 Epigenetics and New Anti-Cancer Treatments At the interface of chemistry, biology, and medicine, Cyrille Thinnes, a DPhil student in the Schofield Group, shares his research into the next generation of anti-cancer treatments. Cyrille Thinnes 19 Jul 2013
32 Introduction: How Chemistry Research Impacts Human Health To truly understand disease, we need to understand the underlying chemical processes that direct human biology. Dr Emily Flashman introduces some of the research in the Department of Chemistry that will help improve our health in future. Emily Flashman 19 Jul 2013
33 Creative Commons Twitter-based early warning and risk communication of the swine flu pandemic in 2009 (Knowledge Exchange Seminar) Patty Kostkova discusses Twitter-based early warning and risk communication of the 2009 swine flu pandemic during a seminar on quantitative methods in social media research held at the OII on 26 September 2012. Patty Kostkova 02 Jan 2013
34 Oxford at Said Seminar: Neuroscience This Oxford at Said seminar showcases some of Oxfords most exciting new research in the area of Neuroscience. Susan Greenfield, Zam Cader, Laura Suter-Dick 13 Aug 2012
35 Vaccines for Global Health Professor Adrian Hill gives a talk for the Oxford Alumni Weekend 2011 on the past, present and future of vaccines against diseases. Adrian Hill 19 Jun 2012
36 Creative Commons Meat and Health In this Health, Environment and Development seminar, Peter Scarborough (a UL in Public Health) discusses the impact of achieving environmental sustainable diets on deaths from cardiovascular disease and cancer in the UK. 18 October 2011. Peter Scarborough 24 May 2012
37 Blood Disorders and Human Malaria Professor Sunetra Gupta explains the surprising relationship between blood disorders and malaria in humans. Could two blood disorders ever be better than one? Part of the Oxford Abridged series of short talks. Sunetra Gupta 10 Feb 2011
38 Creative Commons Drug Discovery Professor Chas Bountra explains how new drugs can offer novel treatments for neurodegenerative and gastrointestinal diseases, as well as pain disorders. Chas Bountra 20 Dec 2010
39 Creative Commons Drug Discovery Professor Chas Bountra explains how new drugs can offer novel treatments for neurodegenerative and gastrointestinal diseases, as well as pain disorders. Chas Bountra 20 Dec 2010
40 Genetic Variation in Inflammation and Immunity Dr Julian Knight explains how new insights into genetic variants which modulate gene expression allow us to better understand why people develop these diseases, and allow us to target treatments more effectively. Julian Knight 29 Nov 2010
41 Creative Commons Chromatin Remodelling Dr Erika Mancini explains how malfunctions in the regulation of chromatin structure often leads to complex multi-system diseases and cancer, notably leukemia. Erika Mancini 15 Nov 2010
42 Creative Commons Global Eradication of Infectious Diseases: Can 'Not Very Much' undermine the goal of 'None at All'? Despite the well-publicised success of global smallpox eradication, 'zero' remains an elusive goal for the majority of vaccine-preventable diseases, making reduced pathogen circulation, or direct protection of the vulnerable more achievable strategies. Jodie McVernon 27 Nov 2009
43 Genetics of Common Human Diseases Peter Donnelly, one of the UK's leading statisticians and geneticists, discusses his involvement in recent projects aimed at understanding the genetics of common human diseases. Peter Donnelly 29 Apr 2009
44 Genetics of Common Human Diseases Peter Donnelly, one of the UK's leading statisticians and geneticists, discusses his involvement in recent projects aimed at understanding the genetics of common human diseases. Peter Donnelly 29 Apr 2009
45 Genetics with Kay Davies Kay Davies discusses her research of genetic diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, problems which limit the development of therapy and the need for effective treatment and screening processes. Kay Davies, Oliver Lewis 09 Feb 2009
46 Andrew Pollard on Childhood Disease Professor Andrew Pollard, Professor of Paediatric Infection and Immunity, and Director of the Oxford Vaccine Centre, discusses childhood diseases, his research into vaccinations, and the problems facing childhood immunisation in the UK and abroad. Andrew Pollard, Oliver Lewis 10 Sep 2008