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personhood

# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (3): The Question of Legal Rights for Animals In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 24 Aug 2017
2 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (2): The Moral Standing of Animals In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 24 Aug 2017
3 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (1): Animals, Human Beings, and Persons In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 24 Aug 2017
4 St Cross Seminar: The moral insignificance of self-consciousness In this talk, Dr Josh Shepherd examines the claim that self-consciousness is highly morally significant. Joshua Shepherd 10 Jun 2015
5 The rights and wrongs of abortion Rebecca Roache discusses the conflicting rights and interests of both foetus and mother. Rebecca Roache, Nigel Warburton, David Edmonds 14 Oct 2014
6 Creative Commons Was Schubert a musical brain? Prof. Raymond Tallis deepens his argument against the idea that we are our brains. He believes there is a distinction in kind between humans and other animals. This he illustrates by appeal to the differences between the music of Schubert and the singing Raymond Tallis 07 May 2014
7 Creative Commons Spiders, yes, but why cats? Prof.Iain McGilchrist illustrates his argument by appeal to a number of paintings done by psychotic patients. He points to various commonalities between these paintings and speculates on the ways in which they support claims about the two hemispheres and Iain McGilchrist 07 May 2014
8 Creative Commons Am I my mind? Prof. Iain McGilchrist, whilst agreeing with Tallis that we are not our brains argues that we can learn a great deal about our culture by learning more about our brain. In particular we should recognise we have two hemispheres, each with a different funct Iain McGilchrist 07 May 2014
9 Creative Commons Am I my brain? Prof. Raymond Tallis argues that extraordinary claims have been made for neurophysiology. For example it has been said that a person is nothing but his or her brain. Professor Raymond Tallis rejects this ‘neuromania’. He shows why it is attractive, but al Raymond Tallis 07 May 2014
10 Creative Commons On the very idea of criteria for personhood (4 Nov 2010) Timothy Chappell, Professor of Philosophy, Open University, gives a talk for the Ian Ramsay Seminar series on 4th November, 2010. Timothy Chappell 18 Apr 2011