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# Episode Title Description People Date
301 From Alligator Wrestling to Fossil Skeletons: Scientific Eccentricity in the Early 19th Century Dr Vicky Carroll talks about the eccentric tendencies of early 19th-century natural historians. Whether hunting for fossils or wrestling alligators, these scientists certainly had an active interest in their field work! Vicky Carroll 20 Sep 2011
302 'More than the Trip' and the role of transport in social exclusion and approaches to develop guidance for the implementation of accessibility planning as an integral part of local transport planning Dr Karen Lucas, Research Fellow in Transport, Accessibility and Social Exclusion at the TSU, delivers a keynote talk at the TDSA conference 'Micro transit: What? Where? Why?' conference, 18-19 August 2011, Brisbane, Australia. Karen Lucas 25 Aug 2011
303 'More than the Trip' and the role of transport in social exclusion and approaches to develop guidance for the implementation of accessibility planning as an integral part of local transport planning Dr Karen Lucas, Research Fellow in Transport, Accessibility and Social Exclusion at the TSU, delivers a keynote talk at the TDSA conference 'Micro transit: What? Where? Why?' conference, 18-19 August 2011, Brisbane, Australia. Karen Lucas 25 Aug 2011
304 Creative Commons Mindreading: From Neuroimaging to the Philosophy of Mind Dr Timothy Baines, Oxford, gives a talk for the Oxford Humanities Research Showcase conference on 11th July 2011. Timothy Bayne 24 Aug 2011
305 Creative Commons The Sacred Rites in Kant's Soul Steve Clarke, James Martin Research Fellow, Institute for Science and Ethics, Oxford Martin School, Oxford gives a talk for the Ian Ramsey Centre for Science and Religion. Steve Clarke 22 Jul 2011
306 Evolutionary Theology Without the Concept of Progress Fraser Watts, Cambridghe, gives a talk for the Ian Ramsey Centre for Science and Religion Seminar series. Fraser Watts 22 Jul 2011
307 Creative Commons Ironing The Ocean - exploring the ocean iron and carbon cycles aboard the RRS discovery in the south atlantic Gideon Henderson, Professor of Earth Sciences and fellow of University College, gives a talk on his research on iron content in the atlantic ocean and its necessity for life in the ocean. Gideon Henderson 01 Jun 2011
308 Creative Commons Ironing The Ocean - exploring the ocean iron and carbon cycles aboard the RRS discovery in the south atlantic Gideon Henderson, Professor of Earth Sciences and fellow of University College, gives a talk on his research on iron content in the atlantic ocean and its necessity for life in the ocean. Gideon Henderson 01 Jun 2011
309 Creative Commons Designing Biotechnology James King, Lead Designer, Science Practice Ltd. gives a talk on Synthetic Biology - a new approach to genetics which applies engineering principles to biology in the hope of creating medicines, fuels, foods and other useful products. James King 24 May 2011
310 Creative Commons Science and Religion Around the World - Book Launch (27 Jan 2011) Geoffrey Cantor, John Brooke, Ronald Numbers and Keith Benson, contributors to the Science and Religion Around the World book, give presentations for the Ian Ramsay Seminar Series on 27th January 2011 as part of the book launch. Geoffrey Cantor, John Brooke, Ronald Numbers, Keith Benson 18 Apr 2011
311 Reconciling Islam and Modern Science: from schizophrenia to harmony (18 Nov 2010) Nidhal Guessoum, Professor of Physics, American University of Sharjah, gives a talk for the Ian Ramsay Seminar series on 18th November 2010. Nidhal Guessoum 18 Apr 2011
312 Creative Commons Investment in transport infrastructure and economic development: recent debates in the United States Andrew Goetz, Professor and Chair of the Department of Geography, University of Denver, gives a talk for the Transport Studies Unit Lecture Series on Future Research in Transport. Andrew Goetz 06 Apr 2011
313 Creative Commons Mobility, place-making, and economic competitiveness Professor Robert Cervero, University of California, Berkeley, gives a seminar for the Future Research in Transport 2011 Hilary Term seminar series. Robert Cervero 15 Mar 2011
314 Creative Commons 10 Billion bits of Entanglement Achieved in Silicon Scientists from Oxford University have made a significant step towards an ultrafast quantum computer by successfully generating 10 billion bits of quantum entanglement in silicon for the first time. This podcast explains how. John Morton 10 Mar 2011
315 Using Science to Enhance Root Function in Crops Part of the Future of Crops Lecture Series held at the Oxford Botanic Gardens. Liam Dolan 19 Jan 2011
316 Molecular Gastronomy is Not Molecular Cooking: A Demonstration: Part 2 Second part of the Molecular Gastronomy is Not Molecular Cooking: A Demonstration special lecture, combining chemistry with cooking. With leading chemist Professor Hervé This and top chef Raymond Blanc OBE. Hervé This, Raymond Blanc 22 Dec 2010
317 Molecular Gastronomy is Not Molecular Cooking: A Demonstration: Part 1 First part of a special Christmas event, with Professor Hervé This; Physical Chemist in the Molecular Gastronomy Group at the Chemistry Laboratory of AgroParisTech and Raymond Blanc OBE; renowned chef and owner of Le Manoir aux Quat' Saisons. Hervé This, Raymond Blanc 22 Dec 2010
318 Creative Commons Tripping the Light Fantastic 2010 Light illuminates and gives life. It also reveals, enlightens, and brings understanding. Jonathan Wood shows us the inspiration and fascination to be found in the use of light, from Harry Potter's invisible cloak to killing cancer cells. Jonathan Wood 18 Dec 2010
319 Christmas Chemistry Show 2010 Join chemists Dr Hugh Cartwright and Dr Malcolm Stewart at Oxford University and find out just how much fun chemistry can be. You will be entertained and educated by the sort of chemistry you never get to see at school, baffling, tantalising and LOUD. Hugh Cartwright, Malcolm Stewart 18 Dec 2010
320 Mathematics in the real world Inspired by Évariste Galois's attempts to express symmetry using mathematical equations, Professor Marcus du Sautoy explores the inextricable link between the physical world and mathematics. Marcus du Sautoy 25 Nov 2010
321 Creative Commons The anatomy of a scientific dispute From the 2010 Alumni Weekend. Conrad Keating, biographer of Richard Doll, gives a talk on the difficulty scientists have at getting people to believe their results, as Richard Doll had when he published his findings on the dangers of smoking. Conrad Keating 25 Oct 2010
322 Creative Commons Carbon Dating: The Science of When Things Happen Dr Thomas Higham gives a talk on Carbon Dating; the way in which scientists establish the age of ancient and prehistoric artefacts. This lecture was delivered at Keble College as part of the Oxford Alumni Weekend 2010. Thomas Higham 20 Oct 2010
323 Creative Commons Leading Transformation:Women at the Cutting Edge of Research and Practice Plenary session on Leading Transformation: Women at the Cutting Edge of Research and Practice from the International Women's Leadership Symposium. Catherine Mitchell, Ana Brito e Melo, Olive Heffernan, Monika Wehrle-MacDevette 31 Aug 2010
324 Creative Commons Inspiring Women - Inspiring Change Jane Butcher, Assistant Director of the UK Resource Centre for Women in Science, Engineering and Technology gives a talk for the International Women's Leadership Symposium. Jane Butcher 31 Aug 2010
325 Cognition, Religion and Theology Justin Barrett gives a talk for the Cognition, Religion and Theology Project Conference, held at Merton College on the 28th-30th June 2010. Justin Barrett 12 Jul 2010
326 A Tale of Two Churches Professor Ben Kaplan (University College London) gives a talk for the 2010 Science and Religious Conflict Conference. Dr Mark Sheehan (Oxford) is the discussant. Ben Kaplan, Mark Sheehan 22 Jun 2010
327 Religious Toleration and Political Liberalism Professor Susan Mendus (York) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference 2010. Dr Nick Southwood (Oxford) is the commentator. Susan Mendus, Nick Southwood 14 Jun 2010
328 Creative Commons Concluding Remarks Professor Richard Dawkins gives a few concluding thoughts on the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. Richard Dawkins 08 Jun 2010
329 Social psychological aspects of religion and prejudice Professor Miles Hewstone (Oxford) gives a talk entitled Social psychological aspects of religion and prejudice: evidence from experimental and survey research. The commentator is Professor Ingmar Persson (Gothenburg University). Miles Hewstone, Ingmar Persson 07 Jun 2010
330 Creative Commons The relation between the neurobiology of morality and religion Professor Patricia Churchland (University of California San Diego) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference.The commentator is Professor Julian Savulescu (Oxford). Patricia Churchland, Julian Savulescu 07 Jun 2010
331 Creative Commons The view from the East pole: Buddhist and Confucian soteriologies and tolerance Professor Owen Flanagan (Duke University) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Dr Guy Kahane (Oxford). Owen Flanagan, Guy Kahane 07 Jun 2010
332 Creative Commons Personal religion, tolerance, and universal compassion Professor Dan Batson (University of Kansas) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Dr Steve Clarke (Oxford). Dan Batson, Steve Clarke 07 Jun 2010
333 Creative Commons Religious disagreement and religious accommodation Professor Tony Coady (University of Melbourne) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Reverend Dr Liz Carmichael (University of Oxford). Tony Coady, Liz Carmichael 07 Jun 2010
334 Creative Commons Religion and compromise Professor Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (Duke University) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The discussant is Dr Nick Shackel (Cardiff). Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Nick Shackel 07 Jun 2010
335 Creative Commons Religious Toleration, Religious Freedom and Human Nature Professor Roger Trigg (Oxford) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Dr John Perry (Oxford). Roger Trigg, John Perry 07 Jun 2010
336 Creative Commons Religion, Cohesion and Hostility Professor Harvey Whitehouse (Oxford) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Professor Michael Wong (Monash University). Harvey Whitehouse, Michael Wong 07 Jun 2010
337 Creative Commons Religion as Parochial Altruism Professor Ara Norenzayan (University of British Columbia) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Professor John Wilkins (Bond University). Ara Norenzayen, John Wilkins 07 Jun 2010
338 Creative Commons Is Religion an Adaptation for Inter-Group Conflict? Dominic Johnson (Edinburgh) gives a talk for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Dr Russell Powell (Oxford). Dominic Johnson, Russell Powell 07 Jun 2010
339 Creative Commons Is Religion Adaptive? Integrating Cognition and Function Professor Robin Dunbar (Oxford) gives the first presentation for the Science and Religious Conflict Conference. The commentator is Professor Janet Radcliffe-Richards (Oxford). Robin Dunbar, Janet Radcliffe-Richards 07 Jun 2010
340 Creative Commons The Science of Ethics: What Counts as Good Research? Mark Sheehan gives a talk on research ethics and asks what counts as good research. Part of the Oxford Bioethics Network series on Issues in Research Ethics. Mark Sheehan 27 May 2010
341 Creative Commons 2.3 Robert Boyle and Isaac Newton Part 2.3. An introduction to Robert Boyle's theory of corpuscularianism and Isaac Newton's ideas on mathematics and the universe. Peter Millican 16 Mar 2010
342 Creative Commons 2.1 Recap of General Philosophy Lecture 1 Part 2.1. A brief recap on the first lecture describing how Aristotle's view of the universe, dominant throughout the middle ages in Europe, came to be gradually phased out by a modern, mechanistic view of the universe. Peter Millican 16 Mar 2010
343 Creative Commons 1.3 Science from Aristotle to Galileo Part 1.3. Describes briefly the Aristotelian view of the universe; the basis for natural science in Europe until the 15th century and its conflict Galileo's theories. Peter Millican 19 Feb 2010
344 Creative Commons Galaxy Zoo - The Rise and Rise of Citizen Science Chris Lintott from the Department of Astrophysics gives a talk on the increasing significant contributions members of the public are making to scientific research through websites such as Galaxy Zoo. Chris Lintott 27 Jan 2010
345 Dr. Malcolm Stewart, Chemistry tutor Dr. Malcolm Stewart on the UNIQ Summer School programme at the University of Oxford. Malcolm Stewart 21 Jan 2010
346 RoboCup Dr. Steven Cameron takes us on a trip to RoboCup. Tiny players roll across the pitch, others lumber unsteadily or roll by. The goals keep coming but the players never tire. It's football, but not as we know it. Say hello to the future of sport. Steven Cameron 21 Dec 2009
347 Why Beckham chose the 23 shirt Why did Beckham chose the 23 shirt? What makes prime numbers special? Marcus duSautoy sheds light on the so-called 'masculine' numbers, explains why prime numbers will help you survive, and opens our eyes to the fascinating world of mathematics. Marcus du Sautoy 21 Dec 2009
348 The Museum of the History of Science: An Introduction Short video presented by Jim Bennett, Director of the Museum of the History of Science, looking into the history of the museum and some of its curiosities. Jim Bennett 10 Dec 2009
349 Mathematics: Navigating Nature's Dark Labyrinth "Mathematics: Navigating Nature's Dark Labyrinth" - the Inaugural Lecture of the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science, 2009. Marcus du Sautoy 30 Nov 2009
350 Making Science Public: Data-sharing, Dissemination and Public Engagement with Science Panel discussion on how social media have changed the nature of the scientific debate among scientists, and how they have impacted on engagement with the public understanding of science. Felix Reed-Tsochas, Maxine Clarke, Ben Goldacre, Cameron Neylon 30 Oct 2009
351 Making Science Public: Data-sharing, Dissemination and Public Engagement with Science How have social media changed the nature of the scientific debate among scientists? Are they challenging the supremacy of editors, reviewers and science communicators? How have they impacted on engagement with the public understanding of science? Felix Reed-Tsochas, Maxine Clarke, Ben Goldacre, Cameron Neylon 07 Oct 2009
352 Sleep in the Global 24/7 Society Professor Foster gives a talk on some of the causes and consequences of sleep disruption and explores how our increasingly sleep deprived society is have unanticipated consequences for out physical and mental health. Russell Foster 24 Aug 2009
353 David Willetts on Investment in Sciences at Universities David Willetts MP, Shadow Secretary of State for Universities and Skills, visited the University of Oxford on Thursday 18 June. Here he discusses the importance of investment in the sciences at universities, particularly during an economic downturn. David Willetts 13 Jul 2009
354 Kim Nasmyth on Biochemistry Head of the Department of Biochemistry Professor Kim Nasmyth talks about the department and what it means to be a biochemist at Oxford. Kim Nasmyth 07 Jul 2009
355 Creative Commons Pheromones: what animals (including humans) say with smell Tristram Wyatt gives a talk on 'The Science of Smell' - Pheromones, outlining their discovery, their chemistry and how animals (and humans) interact through smell. Part of the 2008 Oxford Alumni Weekend. Tristram Wyatt 23 Jun 2009
356 Colloquium Week 2: Myths about the Medieval World There are some standard modern myths (e.g. "medieval people thought the earth was flat"; "they were considered old at the age of 30", etc.) which historians are always encountering in their audiences, and I will try to de-bunk some of these. Emilie Savage-Smith 05 Jun 2009
357 Physics of the Impossible Professor Michio Kaku poses the question: "where does the realm of science fiction end?" He explores the actual possibilities of ideas such as time travel, force fields, teleportation, star ships and invisibility. Michio Kaku 05 Jun 2009
358 Pheromones and Diabetes In the third edition of Inside Oxford Science zoologist Dr Tristram Wyatt explores the science of pheromones and Professor Frances Ashcroft tells us about her role in basic research into diabetes. Marcus du Sautoy, Frances Ashcroft, John Wood, Pedro Ferreira 26 May 2009
359 Pheromones and Diabetes In the third edition of Inside Oxford Science zoologist Dr Tristram Wyatt explores the science of pheromones and Professor Frances Ashcroft tells us about her role in basic research into diabetes. Marcus du Sautoy, Frances Ashcroft, John Wood, Pedro Ferreira 26 May 2009
360 Challenges and opportunities in a changing world Dr Kohn is a pharmacologist, entrepreneur and a musician. In his lecture he drew on his experience throughout his distinguished career, combining his love of music and his life as a baritone of professional standing with that of a medical scientist. Ralph Kohn 05 May 2009
361 Challenges and opportunities in a changing world Dr Kohn is a pharmacologist, entrepreneur and a musician. In his lecture he drew on his experience throughout his distinguished career, combining his love of music and his life as a baritone of professional standing with that of a medical scientist. Ralph Kohn 05 May 2009
362 Dark Matter and Architecture in Science In the second edition of Inside Oxford Science Pedro explores dark matter and cosmic voids whilst Marcus leads a debate on whether great architecture can inspire great science. Marcus du Sautoy, Irene Tracey, Chris Lintott, Pedro Ferreira 14 Apr 2009
363 Ian Goldin at University of Cape Town Speaking at the Vice-Chancellor's Open Lecture, Dr Ian Goldin asked: Are the world's leading thinkers anticipating the risks and opportunities of the 21st century, or will humanity be overtaken by its own medical, technological and scientific successes? Ian Goldin 18 Mar 2009
364 Synaesthesia and Citizen Science Part one. The team examines the neurological condition synaesthesia and the recent Oxford study which sheds light on its genetic basis. Also explored is Galaxy Zoo, an innovative Oxford project which asks the public to help classify galaxies. Marcus du Sautoy, Irene Tracey, Chris Lintott, Pedro Ferreira 02 Mar 2009
365 Gordon Brown: Science and our Economic Future UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown delivers the 2009 Romanes Lecture, arguing that investment in science and the next generation of scientists is key to the UK's future competitiveness. Gordon Brown 27 Feb 2009
366 Peter Harrison on Science and Religion Professor Peter Harrison discusses the relationship between science and religion, the myths that surround the relationship, and discusses some of the contentious contemporary issues. Peter Harrison, Oliver Lewis 22 Oct 2008
367 21st Century Challenges: Humanity at the Crossroads? Dr Ian Goldin provides an overview of the work of the James Martin 21st Century School and looks at the challenges facing humanity in the 21st Century. Ian Goldin 15 Oct 2008
368 Reflections on the environment and science at Oxford Prof Alex Halliday discusses the role of isotope geoscience in understanding present day environmental issues. He also reflects on studying science at Oxford. Alex Halliday 12 Sep 2008
369 What is Science for? What is science for, what good does it do and should it do good? John Sulston, John Harris, Richard Dawkins 10 Jun 2008
370 Entertaining Chemistry Dr. Hugh Cartwright gives his chemistry demonstrations at the Sutton Trust Chemistry Summer School, a week long workshop featuring chemistry lectures and lab work. Hugh Cartwright 22 Apr 2008