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Bodleian Libraries

The Bodleian Libraries of the University of Oxford form the largest university library system in the United Kingdom. They include the principal University library-the Bodleian Library-which has been a library of legal deposit for 400 years; major research libraries; and libraries attached to faculties, departments and other institutions of the University. The combined library collections number more than 11 million printed items, in addition to 30,000 e-journals and vast quantities of materials in other formats. The Old Bodleian is also a major visitor attraction, drawing over 300,000 visitors a year. More information about the Bodleian Libraries and their activities can be found at http://www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/

Series associated with Bodleian Libraries

Centre for the Study of the Book
Crossing Borders: Hebrew Manuscripts as a Meeting-place of Cultures
History of the Book 2017
Medieval German Studies
Oxford Union Library Audio Tour
Recording the Reformation
Reformation 2017
Researchers at work in Bodleian archives and historic collections
Shelley's Ghost: Reshaping the Image of a Literary Family
Staging History, 1780 to 1840
The Bodleian Libraries (BODcasts)
The Paratexts Podcast
The UN at 70: witness seminar
# Episode Title Description People Date
101 Four centuries of Chinese book collecting Third Lunchtime lecture accompanying the exhibition Marks of Genius: Masterpieces from the Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. With Mr David Helliwell. David Helliwell 19 May 2015
102 The Trade in Printed Books: an ingenious innovation that changed the Western World Second in the Marks of Genius series, with Dr Christina Dondi Christina Dondi 19 May 2015
103 Abridging Histories: Capt. James Cook and the Voyages of Reading (1784–) Professor Michael Suarez, in the Lyell Lectures 2015, urges scholars to remember the books that most readers encountered: the cheaper abridged versions of popular novels and accounts such as Cook's voyages. Michael Suarez 18 May 2015
104 Naming Names: Underwriting Patronage in Tonson’s Cæsar (1712) Professor Michael Suarez, in the Lyell Lectures 2015, locates the visual sources of a famous illustrated edition of Caesar's works and comments on the social and political significance of the subscription plate book. Michael Suarez 18 May 2015
105 Singular Multiples: Comprehending the General Evening Post (1754–86) Professor Michael Suarez continues the Lyell Lectures 2015, showing that archival evidence is necessary to understand the history of newspapers Michael Suarez 18 May 2015
106 Proliferating Images: Diagrams of the Slave Ship Brookes (1789) Professor Michael Suarez traces the transatlantic journey of a famous image deployed against the slave trade. Michael Suarez 18 May 2015
107 True Colours: A Natural History of Louis Renard’s Poissons (1719) Professor Michael Suarez continues the Lyell Lectures 2015, asking what role colour plays in bibliographical description? Michael Suarez 18 May 2015
108 Graham Greene and Josephine Reid Adam Smyth talks to Balliol College, Oxford archivist Anna Sander about an exciting new archive of letters relating to Graham Greene and his secretary, Josephine Reid. Adam Smyth, Anna Sander 13 May 2015
109 Engraved Throughout: Pine's Horace (1733) as a Bibliographical Object Professor Michael Suarez gives the first Lyell Lecture of 2015. Michael Suarez 08 May 2015
110 Creative Commons Oxford Figures: 800 Years of the Mathematical Sciences Professor Robin Wilson, author of Alice's Adventures in Numberland, gives a talk on the history of studying Mathematics at Oxford, which is as old as the University itself. Robin Wilson 06 May 2015
111 The Lives of Harold Macmillan and Roy Jenkins Political biographers D R Thorpe and John Campbell speak about their subjects' careers culminating in the role of Chancellor of the University of Oxford. The discussion was chaired by Lord Patten of Barnes. D R Thorpe, John Campbell, Chris Patten 14 Nov 2014
112 Conscription and Conscientious Objection In this short talk Professor Martin Ceadel, Fellow and Tutor in Politics, New College, Oxford discusses the issue of military conscription and conscientious objection during the first world war. Martin Ceadel 12 Nov 2014
113 The Problem with Propaganda Dr Adrian Gregory, Fellow and Tutor in History, Pembroke College, Oxford discusses the use of propaganda by all sides during the first world war. Adrian Gregory 12 Nov 2014
114 The Meaning of 1914 A conversation between Professor Sir Hew Strachan and Professor Margaret MacMillan, chaired by Professor Patricia Clavin. Hew Strachan, Margaret MacMillan, Patricia Clavin 30 Oct 2014
115 Creative Commons Hand-press printing A demonstration of and discussion about hand-press printing with the Bodleian's Dr Paul Nash. Paul Nash, Adam Smyth 25 Sep 2014
116 Creative Commons Scribal correction and literary craft: English manuscripts 1375-1510 Adam Smyth talks to Professor Daniel Wakelin about his new book on cultures of correction in later medieval manuscripts. Daniel Wakelin, Adam Smyth 08 Jul 2014
117 Creative Commons 'Almost Identical': Copying Books in England, 1600-1900 Henry Woudhuysen joins Adam Smyth to discuss the history of facsimiles. Henry Woudhuysen, Adam Smyth 19 Jun 2014
118 Creative Commons Pax Canadiana: Canada, the Commonwealth, and the End of Empire Dr McKercher is Royal Bank of Canada Visiting Scholar at the Bodleian Library. His research explores Canadian reactions to the demise of the British imperial order, looking at Canadian foreign relations beyond the North Atlantic. Asa McKercher, Richard Ovenden, Margaret MacMillan 13 Jun 2014
119 Creative Commons Self-publishing in 18th-century Paris and London Marie-Claude Felton, a Royal Bank of Canada-Bodleian Visiting Scholar in 2013-14, describes her research on the legal and business history of self-publishing in the eighteenth century. Marie-Claude Felton 05 Jun 2014
120 Creative Commons Self-publishing in 18th-century Paris and London Marie-Claude Felton, Royal Bank of Canada-Bodleian Visiting Scholar, gives a talk for the Bodleian Library BODcasts series Marie-Claude Felton 05 Jun 2014
121 Creative Commons Ether and Wireless: an Old Medium into New Media Jaume Navarro (Byrne-Bussey Marconi Fellow, 2013) talks about the influence of the idea of the 'ether', an all-pervading substance, in the history of wireless communication. Jaume Navarro, Guglielmo Marconi 15 May 2014
122 Creative Commons How to make your own eyeglasses for about one pound: an Oxford technology created to benefit the developing World Professor Joshua Silver talks about his invention of the self adjusting spectacles. Joshua Silver 27 Mar 2014
123 Creative Commons The History of Oxford University Press Adam Smyth is joined by Professor Ian Gadd to discuss his just-published collection on the history of OUP. Adam Smyth, Ian Gadd 17 Mar 2014
124 Creative Commons Bibliography in Bits Adam Smyth talks to Professor Will Noel about the potentials of digital technology for the study of manuscripts. Will Noel, Adam Smyth 23 Feb 2014
125 Lord Nuffield's Legacy to Oxford Dr Eric Sidebottom, Retired University Lecturer in Experimental Pathology, gives a lunch time talk to accompany the exhibition "Great Medical Discoveries: 800 Years of Oxford Innovation". Eric Sidebottom 07 Feb 2014
126 Creative Commons Early modern plays in bits and pieces Professor Tiffany Stern joins Dr Adam Smyth to discuss her current research on the materiality of the early modern play text. What happens to our thinking about plays when prologues, epilogues and songs become mobile pieces, detached from the whole? Tiffany Stern, Adam Smyth 03 Feb 2014
127 Oxford Medical Firsts: Celebrating 800 Years of Oxford Medicine. Conrad Keating, Writer-In-Residence, The Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Oxford, gives a lecture about the remarkable contribution Oxford has made to the art and science of medicine. Conrad Keating 28 Nov 2013
128 Creative Commons Embodying song in Early Modern England Katherine Larson (University of Toronto) gives a talk on music in Early Modern England accompanied by Lutenist Matthew Faulk Katherine Larson, Matthew Faulk 26 Nov 2013
129 Creative Commons Wolves and Winter: Old Norse Myths and Children's Literature Dr Carolyne Larrington, Supernumerary Fellow and Tutor in English, St John's College, gives a talk to accompany the exhibition 'Magical Books: From The Middle Ages to Middle Earth'. Carolyne Larrington 23 Oct 2013
130 Stoicism and its Legacy A lecture given by Dr John Sellars, lecturer in Philosophy, Birkbeck, University of London, about Stoicism to accompany the display at the Bodleian Library; Stoicism and its Legacy. John Sellars 06 Jun 2013
131 Once and Future Arthurs - Arthurian Literature for Children Anna Caughey gives a lecture at the Bodleian Library looking at the varying spectrum of literature about King Arthur written for children. Anna Caughey 06 Jun 2013
132 Creative Commons Richard Wagner: 200 Today Lecturer and conductor Dr Paul Coones delivers a lecture celebrating the 200th birthday of Richard Wagner. The talk is preceded by Siegried's Horn Call played by Sophie Dillon and includes the rarely performed Kinder-Katechismus zu Kosel's Geburtstag. Paul Coones 22 May 2013
133 The Hobbit at the Bodleian: World Book Day 2010 Judith Priestman, curator of literary manuscripts at the Bodleian library, discusses the World Book Day 2010 Tolkien exhibition, at which a selection of J.R.R. Tolkien's original artwork for The Hobbit, was on display to the public. Judith Priestman 22 May 2013
134 Dr Lawrence Goldman introduces the commemoration, 'Jim Callaghan Remembered' Dr Lawrence Goldman, editor of the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, introduces and chairs the seminar to commemorate the centenary of Jim Callaghan's birth. Lawrence Goldman 10 May 2013
135 Audiotour 19: Conclusions Part nineteen of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
136 Audiotour 18: Carving part two Part eighteen of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
137 Audiotour 17: Carving part one Part seventeen of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
138 Audiotour 16: Ceiling Part sixteen of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
139 Audiotour 15: Fireplace Part fifteen of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
140 Audiotour 14: Mural 10 Part fourteen of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
141 Audiotour 13: Mural 9 Part thirteen of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
142 Audiotour 12: Mural 8 Part twelve of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
143 Audiotour 11: Mural 7 Part eleven of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
144 Audiotour 10: Mural 6 Part ten of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
145 Audiotour 09: Mural 5 Part nine of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
146 Audiotour 08: Mural 4 Part eight of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
147 Audiotour 07: Mural 3 Part seven of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
148 Audiotour 06: Mural 2 Part six of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
149 Audiotour 05: Mural 1 Part five of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
150 Audiotour 04: Looking at Each Mural Part four of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
151 Audiotour 03: Deterioration and Restoration Part three of the Oxford Union Library Tour. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
152 Audiotour 02: History of the Murals Part two of the Oxford Union Library. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
153 Audiotour 01: Introduction Part one of the tour of the Oxford Union Library. Olivia Cross 02 May 2013
154 Andrew Smith MP pays tribute to Jim Callaghan Member of Parliament for Oxford East, Andrew Smith gives his view of Jim Callaghan. Andrew Smith 23 Apr 2013
155 Michael Callaghan remembers his father Jim Callaghan Jim Callaghan's son Michael gives a talk about his memories of his fathers political life. Michael Callaghan 23 Apr 2013
156 Margaret Jay, Baroness Jay of Paddington remembers her father, Jim Callaghan The daughter of Jim Callaghan, Margaret Jay, gives the closing speech for the event. Margaret Jay 23 Apr 2013
157 Lord Owen remembers Jim Callaghan British politician Lord Owen talks about his experiences of Jim Callaghan. David Owen 23 Apr 2013
158 Lord Morgan remembers Jim Callaghan Historian and author Lord Morgan speaks about the Jim Callaghan papers deposited in the Bodleian. Kenneth Morgan 23 Apr 2013
159 Lord Donoughue remembers Jim Callaghan British politician, businessman and author Baron Donoughue of Ashton speaks about his view as special advisor to Jim Callaghan. Bernard Donoughue 23 Apr 2013
160 Creative Commons Xu Bing: The Kind of Artist I Am Chinese Artist Xu Bing gives a talk on the subject of his art and the kind of artist he is. Xu Bing 22 Apr 2013
161 Creative Commons Marconi and the Broadcasting Option: Annual Byrne-Bussey Marconi Lecture Held on Marconi day; 20th April, Gabriele Balbi (University of Lugano) gives a talk about Marconi, co-inventor of the radio. Gabriele Balbi 22 Apr 2013
162 Roy Strong talks to Brian Sewell Self-portrait as a Young Man Art critic Brian Sewell talks to Sir Roy Strong as part of the Times Literary Festival 2013. Brian Sewell, Roy Strong 15 Apr 2013
163 Creative Commons Image Matching on Printed Images in Bodleian Collections Giles Bergel and Andrew Zisserman from the Broadside Ballad Connections project demonstrate new image matching software that allows researchers to track images across early forms of printed literature. Visit http://ballads.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/. Giles Bergel, Andrew Zisserman, Relja Arandjelovic 13 Dec 2012
164 Creative Commons Dickens' Railways Professor Stphen Gill, Lincoln College, gives a talk about the influence the Railways had on Charles Dickens' literature. Stephen Gill 26 Oct 2012
165 Creative Commons The Romance of the Middle Ages Dr Nicholas Perkins talks about how romance functions as a genre in the middle ages, especially about how gifts and tokens were exchanged as signs of fidelity, specifically in Sir Orfeo, Sir Gawain, and King Horn. Nicholas Perkins 21 Jun 2012
166 Creative Commons Jane Austen's Manuscripts Explored Professor Kathyrn Sutherland from the University of Oxford talks around the manuscripts of Jane Austen, what we can learn from them about her family life but also her writing style and techniques. Kathryn Sutherland 08 Jun 2012
167 Creative Commons The Watsons: Jane Austen Practising Professor Kathryn Sutherland from the University of Oxford talks about some of Jane Austen's manuscripts from the novel "The Watsons" and what we can learn about her from these. Kathryn Sutherland 08 Jun 2012
168 Creative Commons Wireless Communications during the Titanic Disaster Michael Hughes (Bodleian Libraries) gives a talk about the final wireless communications from the Titanic. Michael Hughes 22 May 2012
169 Creative Commons The Bodleian Library and the Scientific Revolution Dr Poole presents the Bodleian and the seventeenth-century Scientific Revolution in terms of its contributions to Oxford and to British science in the period. William Poole 08 May 2012
170 Creative Commons Shakespeare and Medieval Romance Professor Helen Cooper, University of Cambridge, speaks about the continuities between the Romance of the middle ages and Shakespeare's plays. She looks at textual features from his plays (including King Lear) which may indicate his influences. Helen Cooper 12 Apr 2012
171 Creative Commons The Birth of Romance in England Dr Laura Ashe delivers a lecture on the birth of romance in England in the 12th Century, part of a series of lectures to accompany The Romance of the Middle Ages exhibition at the Bodleian Library. Laura Ashe 23 Feb 2012
172 Creative Commons The Role of Open Access in Maximising The Impact of Biomedical Research Sir Mark Walport, Director of the Wellcome Trust, gives a lecture on scholarship, publishing and the dissemination of research designed to stimulate debate in Oxford on the issues surrounding changes in scholarly communications. Sir Mark Walport 26 Apr 2011
173 Creative Commons Brought to Book: Book History and the Idea of Literature Professor Paul Eggert, University of New South Wales, gives the 17th Annual D.F. McKenzie lecture on the subject of books and gives a case study of Henry Lawson, Australian author of Where the Billy Boils. Paul Eggert 09 Mar 2011
174 Creative Commons Mary Shelley - Journal of Sorrow Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. In the months immediately following Shelley's death Mary lived at Albaro on the outskirts of Genoa. Her only regular companions were her young son, Percy Florence, and the journal she began on 2 October 1822. Nouran Koriem 02 Dec 2010
175 Creative Commons Mary Shelley - Journal of Sorrow Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. In the months immediately following Shelley's death Mary lived at Albaro on the outskirts of Genoa. Her only regular companions were her young son, Percy Florence, and the journal she began on 2 October 1822. Nouran Koriem 02 Dec 2010
176 Creative Commons William Godwin- Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This is the letter Godwin wrote to Mary after hearing of Shelley's death. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
177 Creative Commons William Godwin- Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This is the letter Godwin wrote to Mary after hearing of Shelley's death. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
178 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Everybody is in despair and every thing in confusion' writes Shelley in his last letter to Mary. He was in Pisa to discuss a new journal, The Liberal, with Leigh Hunt and Lord Byron. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
179 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Letter to Mary Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Everybody is in despair and every thing in confusion' writes Shelley in his last letter to Mary. He was in Pisa to discuss a new journal, The Liberal, with Leigh Hunt and Lord Byron. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
180 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Adonais. An Elegy on the Death of John Keats Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This great elegy was prompted by the news of the death of John Keats in Rome, and by Shelley's belief that Keats's illness was caused by the hostile notices his work had been given in the Quarterly Review. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
181 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Adonais. An Elegy on the Death of John Keats Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. This great elegy was prompted by the news of the death of John Keats in Rome, and by Shelley's belief that Keats's illness was caused by the hostile notices his work had been given in the Quarterly Review. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
182 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Opening lines of 'The Triumph of Life' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley worked on 'The Triumph of Life', a dark and visionary poem, while living at the Villa Magni. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
183 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Opening lines of 'The Triumph of Life' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley worked on 'The Triumph of Life', a dark and visionary poem, while living at the Villa Magni. Hoare Nairne 02 Dec 2010
184 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Dedication fair copy of 'With a guitar. To Jane' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley presented this light-hearted poem, copied out in his best hand, with the guitar he gave to Jane Williams in 1822. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
185 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Dedication fair copy of 'With a guitar. To Jane' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley presented this light-hearted poem, copied out in his best hand, with the guitar he gave to Jane Williams in 1822. Jordan Saxby 02 Dec 2010
186 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Fair copy of Ode to the West Wind Part of the Shelly's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley's best-known poem was written in Florence in late 1819. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
187 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Fair copy of Ode to the West Wind Part of the Shelly's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley's best-known poem was written in Florence in late 1819. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
188 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Draft of 'Ozymandias' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Ozymandias' is the Greek name for Ramses II, who ruled Egypt for sixty-seven years from 1279 to 1213 BC. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
189 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley - Draft of 'Ozymandias' Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. 'Ozymandias' is the Greek name for Ramses II, who ruled Egypt for sixty-seven years from 1279 to 1213 BC. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
190 Creative Commons Mary Shelley (with Percy Bysshe Shelley) - Draft of Frankenstein Mary Shelley drafted Frankenstein in two tall notebooks. The first notebook was probably purchased in Geneva, the second several months later in England. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
191 Creative Commons Mary Shelley (with Percy Bysshe Shelley) - Draft of Frankenstein Mary Shelley drafted Frankenstein in two tall notebooks. The first notebook was probably purchased in Geneva, the second several months later in England. Christopher Adams 02 Dec 2010
192 Creative Commons Harriet Shelley - Letter to Eliza Westbrook, Shelley and her parents Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Harriet Shelley drowned herself in December 1816, aged twenty-one. Her body was recovered from the Serpentine on 10 December, and an inquest into the death of one 'Harriet Smith' was held the following day. Hannah Morrell 02 Dec 2010
193 Creative Commons Harriet Shelley - Letter to Eliza Westbrook, Shelley and her parents Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Harriet Shelley drowned herself in December 1816, aged twenty-one. Her body was recovered from the Serpentine on 10 December, and an inquest into the death of one 'Harriet Smith' was held the following day. Hannah Morrell 02 Dec 2010
194 Creative Commons Mary Shelley - Letter to Percy Bysshe Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary arrived back in London to face the almost universal disapproval of family and friends, and severe money problems. Nouran Koriem 02 Dec 2010
195 Creative Commons Mary Shelley - Letter to Percy Bysshe Shelley Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary arrived back in London to face the almost universal disapproval of family and friends, and severe money problems. Nouran Koriem 02 Dec 2010
196 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley - Joint journal entry Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary eloped at 4.15 am on 28 July 1814, accompanied by Mary's step-sister Jane Clairmont. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
197 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley and Mary Shelley - Joint journal entry Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Shelley and Mary eloped at 4.15 am on 28 July 1814, accompanied by Mary's step-sister Jane Clairmont. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
198 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley: Letter to William Godwin Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Using false names, Shelley sent copies of The Necessity of the Atheism to 'men of thought and learning', including bishops and clergymen. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
199 Creative Commons Percy Bysshe Shelley: Letter to William Godwin Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Using false names, Shelley sent copies of The Necessity of the Atheism to 'men of thought and learning', including bishops and clergymen. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010
200 Creative Commons William Godwin: Memoirs of the Author of a Vindication of the Rights of Woman Part of the Shelley's Ghost Exhibition. Godwin's memoir of Mary Wollstonecraft has been called the first modern biography. At the time, however, its frankness and emotional candour provoked general outrage. Henry Cockburn 02 Dec 2010