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Department for Continuing Education

Oxford was one of the pioneers of the University Extension movement in the United Kingdom, and we still retain our original mission of making the scholarship of the University accessible to wider audiences.
In recent years the Department has grown very considerably, and now every year more than 15,000 people join one or more of our courses. Our students may be members of the public who wish to study a subject out of general interest or for personal satisfaction, members of professional groups or business organisations who wish to update their professional knowledge and skills, or participants in our increasingly large number of courses for international groups.
Most of our longer courses now lead to a University award or other forms of credit but the large number of short courses on offer may be taken by those who are less interested in obtaining further qualifications. Courses last from one day to several weeks; the residential courses are held in Oxford but other part-time courses are also held in a large number of other centres.

Series associated with Department for Continuing Education

2013 Philosophy and Psychiatry Summer School
A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners
A Romp Through Philosophy for Complete Beginners
A Romp Through the Philosophy of Mind
Alan Turing: Centenary Lectures
Anne McLaren Memorial Lectures
Bioethics: An Introduction
Clinical Trials in Resource-Limited Settings
Crime Fiction in Oxford
Critical Reasoning for Beginners
Critical Reasoning: A Romp Through the Foothills of Logic
Department for Continuing Education Award Ceremony 2014
Department for Continuing Education Open Day 2012
Department for Continuing Education Open Day 2013
Department for Continuing Education Open Day 2014
Department for Continuing Education's guest lectures
Design for War and Peace: 2014 Annual Design History Society Conference
Humanities at the Department for Continuing Education
Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences at the Department for Continuing Education
Oxford Vaccinology Programme
Philosophy for Beginners
Research within the Department for Continuing Education
Revisiting the Rite: The Rite of Spring Centenary Conference
Rewley House Research Seminars
Science in Society
Social Sciences at the Department for Continuing Education
Study Programmes at Continuing Education
The Credit Crunch and Global Recession
The Emergent Multiverse
The God Delusion Weekend
The Nature of Causation
# Episode Title Description People Date
101 Creative Commons Analysing Arguments: How to Identify Premises and Conclusions Lecture 2 of 6 in Marianne Talbot's series on critical reasoning for beginners. Marianne Talbot 20 Mar 2014
102 Creative Commons The Nature Of Argument: How to Recognise Arguments Lecture 1 of 6 in Marianne Talbot's series on critical reasoning for beginners. Marianne Talbot 20 Mar 2014
103 Creative Commons An Introduction to the Oxford University International Politics Summer School A short introduction to the Oxford University International Politics Summer School by the Programme Director and students. Paul Chaisty, Mohammed Al Hinai, Fiona Glenister, Nelleke Hijmans 10 Mar 2014
104 Creative Commons An Introduction to the Oxford University Creative Writing Summer School A short introduction to the Oxford University Creative Writing Summer School by the Programme Director and students. Tara Stubbs, John Collins, Dalia Hosn, Nathan Smale 10 Mar 2014
105 ‘Archaeology in Practice’ at Oxford University Department for Continuing Education Information about the online short course: ‘Archaeology in Practice’ and other online short courses. Wendy Morrison 10 Mar 2014
106 Creative Commons Studying archaeology at Oxford University Department for Continuing Education Information about the range of part-time archaeology courses on offer at Oxford University Department for Continuing Education. David Griffiths 10 Mar 2014
107 The archaeology training excavation at Dorchester-on-Thames Students on the Undergraduate Certificate in Archaeology learn a range of archaeological techniques on the training excavation at Dorchester-on-Thames, Oxfordshire. Wendy Morrison, Jeanne Peskett, William Garrard, David Griffiths 10 Mar 2014
108 Creative Commons Britain's economic problems and prospects At the time of the 2008 global credit crunch, I participated in Oxford's online debate on whether the economic crisis sounded the death knell for laissez faire capitalism. Jonathan Michie 07 Oct 2013
109 Party games: coalition government in British politics This session will look at the history of coalition government in British politics over the past 200 years and discuss some of the constitutional implications of the current Conservative/Liberal Democrat government under David Cameron and Nick Clegg. Angus Hawkins 07 Oct 2013
110 Creative Commons Philosophy in 45 minutes! Philosophy deals with the BIG questions of life: does God exist? How should we live? What is truth? What are numbers and do we need them? Does space come to an end or is it infinite? NO SOUND FOR FIRST 3 MINUTES. Marianne Talbot 07 Oct 2013
111 Fitzgerald beyond Gatsby With the recent resurgence in interest in F. Scott Fitzgerald following Baz Luhrmann's imaginative film adaptation of Fitzgerald's 1925 novel The Great Gatsby have come the inevitable clichés of the 'lost generation' and the 'American dream'. Tara Stubbs 07 Oct 2013
112 Creative Commons Gustav Klimt and secessionist Vienna Vienna around 1900 witnessed a vital and anxious surge in art, design, literature and music. This creativity also inspired psychological investigations into the inner self and dreams, most famously by Sigmund Freud. Claire O'Mahony 07 Oct 2013
113 Creative Commons Surprises - for you and for mathematics In 1900, pure mathematics had the smug air of a finished product. We thought we knew what it was and we thought we knew how it was done. Bob Lockhart 07 Oct 2013
114 International education: the transformative effect of student migration In this short lecture we will consider what the internationalisation of higher education means, and the global implications of international mobility - on the students, on their 'receiving' countries and on their places of origin. Johanna Waters 07 Oct 2013
115 Why music matters in your life Imagine a world without music. No music on the radio, no concerts, no musical instruments. No background music in films and television. No music at our weddings, funerals, religious worship or sporting events. Jonathan Darnborough 07 Oct 2013
116 Creative Commons Where's all the wildlife? Flooding and the importance of landscape conservation The Oxfordshire floods of 2007, 2008 and 2012 caused enormous disruption to homes, agriculture and local businesses, but what were the consequences for wildlife? Kerry Lock 07 Oct 2013
117 Creative Commons What's so great about Austen? Isn't she just bonnets and balls? Some film and tv adaptations of Jane Austen's novels might give the impression that the stories are little more than Mills and Boon-type romances in empire-line frocks. Sandie Byrne 07 Oct 2013
118 Creative Commons Too many words? An irreverent guide to screenwriting Aristotle's 'Poetics' is regarded as the earliest surviving work of dramatic theory. How much notice do Goldman, Godard, Bertolucci or indeed Tarantino pay to his classic tenets of drama? Victor Glynn 04 Oct 2013
119 Creative Commons Who needs migrant workers? Controversies in international labour migration The regulation of labour immigration is among the most important and controversial public policy issues in high-income countries. Martin Ruhs 04 Oct 2013
120 Creative Commons A history of England in five and a half maps There is a story behind every map. Generation after generation, we have imprinted ourselves on the land we live upon. Our depictions of that land, in maps, have recorded social attitudes and social change like no other source. Jonathan Healey 04 Oct 2013
121 Creative Commons Spotlight on Archaeology Find out about how archaeologists uncover the past using a range of techniques, including excavation, survey and scientific analysis. Alison MacDonald 04 Oct 2013
122 Anniversaries, feasts and commemoration in the Middle Ages Ritual celebrations were at the heart of life in medieval communities. The passage of time was articulated by the cycle of the seasons, the exigencies of husbandry and of trade, all inextricably bound up with religious holidays and anniversaries. Elizabeth Gemmill 04 Oct 2013
123 Speaking stories: the oral roots of poetry We'll be looking at Beowulf and the epic as a way of passing on experience and history. See your own life as an epic! Where would you start? What would you leave out? Surprise yourself - and us! Jenny Lewis 04 Oct 2013
124 Creative Commons The art of war: The Hundred Years' War in twenty objects This lecture will examine one of the longest wars in history, fought between England and France from 1337 to 1453 by scrutinising twenty objects. Janina Ramirez 04 Oct 2013
125 Postcolonial futures: the Caribbean in dialogue Dr Kevon Rhiney, Commonwealth Fellow and lecturer (Department of Geography and Geology, University of the West Indies) considers contemporary social and economic development in Jamaica, in the light of environmental vulnerability and climate change. David Howard, Kevon Rhiney 12 Jun 2013
126 Gender Gender relations shape our everyday interactions at work, on the street and in the home. Our speakers cover a wide range of topics, from historical, legal and therapeutic perspectives. Linda Scott, Frances Richardson, Nazila Ghanea-Hercock, Alistair Ross 12 Jun 2013
127 Learning and Work in Medieval England Did Medieval people go on learning through their adult life? If so, what kind of things did they learn about, who taught them, and how was it done? This lecture was delivered 23rd May 2013 as part of national Adult Learners' Week. Elizabeth Gemmill 29 May 2013
128 Creative Commons Decay The presentations focus on the importance of disappearance as much as appearance, presence as well as absence, and growth in the guise of degeneration, arguing from difference perspectives for the importance of malaise or corrosion as a subject of study. David Howard, Martin Neubert, Robert Vanderplank, Tara Stubbs 22 May 2013
129 Creative Commons The Num8er My5teries Professor Marcus du Sautoy - mathematician, footballer and amateur musician - shows how mathematicians have contributed to our understanding of the world around us for millennia. Marcus du Sautoy 19 Dec 2012
130 Economics: which way now? Dr Martin Ruhs introduces the Department's expanding portfolio of economics courses, in the context of the on-going debate about where economics is headed, starting with the world economic downturn. Martin Ruhs 19 Dec 2012
131 Creative Commons Henry II and the Twelfth-Century World Dr Elizabeth Gemmill introduces the most remarkable monarch, Henry II, whose dominions stretched from the south west of France to the north of Britain. His achievements have lasted until our own times, but his reign was marred by tragedy too. Elizabeth Gemmill 19 Dec 2012
132 Creative Commons W.B. Yeats and the Ghost Club Dr Tara Stubbs uses exciting new research findings to discuss the close links between Yeats's attendances at the Ghost Club during the 1910s-1920s, his (sometimes amusing) spiritualist experiments, and his poetic works. Tara Stubbs 19 Dec 2012
133 Creative Commons Boulevards, Brushwork and Bugattis : Modern Art and Design in Paris In the nineteenth-century Paris was transformed into an alluring spectacle of cafés, department stores and exhibitions. Dr Claire O'Mahony looks at the inspiration of the modern city of light from Impressionist painters to the glamour of Art Deco. Claire O'Mahony 19 Dec 2012
134 Creative Commons Philosophy in 45 minutes! Marianne Talbot takes participants on a romp through the nature of philosophy for complete beginners discussing some of the BIG questions of life: does God exist? How should we live? What is truth? Does space come to an end or is it infinite? Marianne Talbot 19 Dec 2012
135 Creative Commons From global credit-crunch to Eurocrisis and double-dip recession: whatever next? The 25 years up to the 2007-8 global credit crunch were ones of privatisation, deregulation, financialisation and, in the UK, demutualisation. Professor Jonathan Michie will discuss the causes and consequences of the global credit crunch. Jonathan Michie 19 Dec 2012
136 Creative Commons Shedding light on the dark ages The Dark Ages are traditionally seen as nasty, brutish and short - a cultural and intellectual waste land, with virtually nothing worthy of art historical consideration. But Janina argues this is far from the truth. Janina Ramirez 05 Dec 2012
137 Creative Commons Fullbright Lecture 2012: When can international intervention be justified and effective? The doctrine of the international community's responsibility to protect the citizens of a country whose government has failed them has strengthened the presumption in favour of international intervention for humanitarian reasons. Sir John Holmes 05 Dec 2012
138 Morphogenesis Then and Now Philip Maini, Oxford University, gives a talk for the Alan Turing Centenary weekend. Philip Maini 22 Oct 2012
139 Congruent Worlds: Turing, Lovelace and Babbage Doron Swade, Royal Holloway, Univ. of London, gives a talk for the Alan Turing Centenary weekend. Doron Swade 22 Oct 2012
140 What Alan Turing might have discovered Stephen Wolfram, founder and CEO of Wolfram Research and creator of Mathematica, gives a talk for the Alan Turing Centenary weekend. Stephen Wolfram 22 Oct 2012
141 Creative Commons Turing in the History of Software Cliff Jones, Newcastle University, gives a talk for the Alan Turing Centenary Weekend. Cliff jones 22 Oct 2012
142 Creative Commons Turing in the age of the Internet and the quantum computer Samson Abramsky, Oxford University, gives a talk for the Alan Turing Centenary weekend. Samson Abramsky 22 Oct 2012
143 Creative Commons Decidability: The Entscheidungs problem Robin Whitty, London South Bank University, gives a talk for the Alan Turing Centenary weekend. Robin Whitty 22 Oct 2012
144 Creative Commons Turing and the Public Consciousness: Turing 2.0(12) Sue Black, University College London, Turing and the Public Consciousness: Turing 2.0(12). Sue Black 22 Oct 2012
145 Creative Commons Welcome Address Jonathan Bowen, London South Bank University. Jonathan Bowen 22 Oct 2012
146 Can robots be made creative enough to invent their own language? Luc Steels delivers the 2012 Simonyi lecture and asks can machines be creative enough to invent their own language? Luc Steels, Marcus du Sautoy 18 Oct 2012
147 Creative Commons Creating a 'John Lewis' economy? - encouraging Corporate Diversity for Sustainable Growth The Coalition Government is committed to greater corporate diversity in the financial services sector, and are promoting 'John Lewis' style mutuals to deliver public services. Jonathan Michie 02 Oct 2012
148 Creative Commons Ethics Ethical decisions, and often dilemma, lie at the heart of all research methodologies and practice. Marianne Talbot, course director in Philosophy, chaired three presentations from across the disciplines. Marianne Talbot, Abi Sriharan, Kate Blackmon, David Griffiths 20 Jun 2012
149 Revolution Revolutionary concepts continually shape and uproot research agendas, and occasionally researchers themselves. This seminar examined the many ways revolution impacts on research. Adrian Stokes, Kerry Lock, Peter Watson 20 Jun 2012
150 Risk The inaugural research seminar invited three speakers to consider how the concept and experience of 'risk' influenced their current research. David Howard, Jonathan Michie, Nigel Mehdi, Adam Josephs 20 Jun 2012
151 Creative Commons Reading List for Bioethics: An Introduction Reading List to accompany the Bioethics: An Introduction podcast series. Marianne Talbot 30 May 2012
152 Creative Commons Common moral arguments: 'morality? It's all a matter of opinion' Final of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
153 Creative Commons Common moral arguments: 'it's too risky' (the Precautionary Principle) Eighth of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
154 Creative Commons Common moral arguments: 'it's not natural' and 'it's disgusting' Seventh of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
155 Creative Commons Induction Sixth of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
156 Creative Commons Deduction Fifth of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
157 Creative Commons Arguments Fourth of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
158 Creative Commons Utilitarianism Third of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
159 Creative Commons Deontology Second of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
160 Creative Commons Virtue Ethics First of nine short introductory podcasts on Bioethics by Marianne Talbot. Marianne Talbot 29 May 2012
161 Inspector Morse in Print and on TV Highly acclaimed crime writer Colin Dexter, OBE, talks at the Crime Fiction Day at St John's College, University of Oxford, on the theme of Inspector Morse. Colin Dexter 15 May 2012
162 Creative Commons Dons, Deaths and Detectives: Oxford in Crime Fiction Professor Colin Bundy, University of Oxford, talks at the Crime Fiction Day at St John's College around the history of detective fiction in Oxford. Colin Bundy 15 May 2012
163 Cluedo and Cadavers: British Detective Fiction Peter Kemp, the Sunday Times fiction editor, talks at the Crime Fiction Day at St John's College, University of Oxford, on the theme of British Detective Fiction. Peter Kemp 15 May 2012
164 Creative Commons Further reading and more... So you've finished this series of podcasts. Find out where to go from here... Marianne Talbot 16 Apr 2012
165 Creative Commons Reading List Reading list for the Philosophy for Beginners series of podcasts. Marianne Talbot 16 Apr 2012
166 Creative Commons Further reading and more... So you've finished this series of podcasts. Find out where to go from here... Marianne Talbot 16 Apr 2012
167 Creative Commons Further reading and more... So you've finished this series of podcasts. Find out where to go from here... Marianne Talbot 16 Apr 2012
168 Creative Commons Further reading and more... So you've finished this series of podcasts. Find out where to go from here... Marianne Talbot 16 Apr 2012
169 Creative Commons Part 5: Questions and Answers Marianne Talbot presents the last of five episodes of the Romp through the Philosophy of Mind, engaging in a questions and answers discussion with the audience. Marianne Talbot 10 Apr 2012
170 Veterinary Vaccines: Protecting livestock - saving human life Lecture given by Dr Michael Witty, former Chairman, GALVmed, during Human and Veterinary Vaccinology short course November 2011. Michael Witty 16 Mar 2012
171 Effective Introduction of New Vaccines: "the UK experience" Lecture given by Prof David Salisbury, Director of Immunisation, UK Department of Health, during Human and Veterinary Vaccinology short course November 2011. David Salisbury 16 Mar 2012
172 Creative Commons Part 4: Are We Asking the Wrong Questions? Marianne Talbot presents the fourth of five episodes of the Romp through the Philosophy of Mind, wondering if we are asking the wrong questions? Marianne Talbot 07 Feb 2012
173 Creative Commons Part 3: If Physicalism Won't Work, What is the Alternative? Marianne Talbot presents the third of five episodes of the Romp through the Philosophy of Mind, on alternatives to Physicalism. Marianne Talbot 07 Feb 2012
174 Creative Commons Part 2: Non-Reductive Physicalisms and the Problems they Face Slides to accompany Marianne Talbot's second of five episodes of the Romp through the Philosophy of Mind, on Non-Reductive Physicalisms and the problems they face. Marianne Talbot 07 Feb 2012
175 Creative Commons Part 1: Identity Theory and Why it Won't Work Marianne Talbot presents the first of five episodes of the Romp through the Philosophy of Mind, on Identity Theory and why it won't work. Marianne Talbot 07 Feb 2012
176 Creative Commons Making Up Your Mind Part 7 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". This final episode is a time to take stock and bring together all the strands we've considered. Marianne Talbot 08 Aug 2011
177 Creative Commons Utilitarianism: Mill and the utility calculus Part 6 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". A reflection on Mill's account of morality, and the greatest happiness of the greatest number. Marianne Talbot 27 Jun 2011
178 Creative Commons Deontology: Kant, duty and the moral law Part 5 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". In this episode we reflect on Kant's account of morality, including the categorical imperative. Marianne Talbot 03 Jun 2011
179 Creative Commons Humean Ethics: Non-Cognitivism, the passions and moral motivation Part 4 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". In this episode we reflect on Hume's account of morality and his rejection of reason as the source of morality. Marianne Talbot 02 Jun 2011
180 Creative Commons Virtue Ethics: virtue, values and character Part 3 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". In this episode we will reflect on Aristotle's account of morality and the centrality of the virtues in this account. Marianne Talbot 24 May 2011
181 Creative Commons Freedom, knowledge and society: the preconditions of ethical reasoning Part 2 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". In this episode we examine the preconditions of ethical reasoning and make a comparison between the law of the land and the moral law. Marianne Talbot 20 May 2011
182 Creative Commons Rules, truths and theories: an introduction to ethical reasoning Part 1 of 7 in Marianne Talbot's "A Romp Through Ethics for Complete Beginners". In this episode we examine moral dilemmas, moral truth and moral knowledge, freewill and determinism. Marianne Talbot 19 May 2011
183 Talking to Camera A new one-day course at the Department for Continuing Education taught by Paul Heiney, writer and broadcaster, this course is intended to help people face a video camera with confidence, and communicate through the fast-growing video media. Paul Heiney 04 May 2011
184 Mathematics in the real world Inspired by Évariste Galois's attempts to express symmetry using mathematical equations, Professor Marcus du Sautoy explores the inextricable link between the physical world and mathematics. Marcus du Sautoy 25 Nov 2010
185 Creative Commons The God Delusion: Questions and Answers Stephen Law and Marianne Talbot take part in a panel discussion with Tom Fisher, chairman of the Oxford Philosophical Society, chairing. They answer questions form the audience about The God Delusion and discuss the philosophical issues surrounding it. Marianne Talbot, Stephen Law, Tom Fisher 20 May 2010
186 Creative Commons Attacking the God hypothesis in other ways Stephen Law gives the fourth talk on Richard Dawkins' The God Delsuon as part of The God Delusion Weekend. Stephen Law 20 May 2010
187 Creative Commons Has Dawkins shown that God is Redundant? Marianne Talbot presents the third talk on Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion as part of The God Delusion Weekend. Marianne Talbot 20 May 2010
188 Creative Commons The Strengths and Weaknesses of The God Delusion Stephen Law givs the second talk on Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion as part of The God Delusion Weekend. Stephen Law 20 May 2010
189 Creative Commons A Scientific Hypothesis? Marianne Talbot gives the first talk on Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion as part of The God Delusion Weekend. Marianne Talbot 20 May 2010
190 Creative Commons Evaluating Arguments Part Two Part six of a six-part series on critical reasoning. In this final lecture we will look at fallacies. These are bad arguments that can easily be mistaken for good arguments. Marianne Talbot 18 Mar 2010
191 Creative Commons Evaluating Arguments Part One Part five of a six-part series on critical reasoning. In this lecture we will continue with the evaluation of arguments - this time deductive arguments - focusing in particular on the notion of validity. Marianne Talbot 15 Mar 2010
192 Creative Commons Taming the Casino Banks In this podcast the experts discuss whether the 'casino' banks that are considered too big to fail are simply too big, and explain the arguments for and against splitting them up. Jonathan Michie, Martin Slater, Linda Yueh 15 Mar 2010
193 Creative Commons What is a Good Argument? Validity and Truth Part four of a six-part series on critical reasoning. In this lecture we will learn how to evaluate arguments and how to tell whether an argument is good or bad, focusing specifically on inductive arguments. Marianne Talbot 11 Mar 2010
194 Creative Commons Setting out Arguments Logic Book Style Part three of a six-part series on critical reasoning. In this lecture we will focus on how to identify and analyse arguments, and how to set arguments out logic book-style to make them easier to evaluate. Marianne Talbot 10 Mar 2010
195 Creative Commons Different Types of Arguments The second of six lectures dealing with critical reasoning. In this lecture you will learn about the different types of arguments, in particular deductive and inductive arguments. Marianne Talbot 29 Jan 2010
196 Creative Commons The Nature of Arguments The first of six lectures dealing with critical reasoning. In this lecture you will learn how to recognise arguments and what the nature of an argument is. Marianne Talbot 29 Jan 2010
197 Creative Commons Bank bonuses, breakups and regulation In the first podcast of 2010, the experts discuss bank bonuses, proposed break-ups and tighter regulation of the banking and financial sectors. Linda Yueh, Jonathan Michie, Martin Slater 28 Jan 2010
198 Mathematics: Navigating Nature's Dark Labyrinth "Mathematics: Navigating Nature's Dark Labyrinth" - the Inaugural Lecture of the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science, 2009. Marcus du Sautoy 30 Nov 2009
199 The Visitors and Residents Principle: A guide to assessing motivations towards the web An update to Prensky's 'Digital Natives' idea, taking the stand-point that individuals attitudes to the web are not primarily governed by age or technical skill. David White 25 Nov 2009
200 Occupational Health and Safety in a Research Setting Dr Simon Ndirangu, Bioanalytical Laboratory at the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI)/Wellcome Trust Research Programme in Kilifi, Kenya discusses the importance of implementing occupational health and safety standards in research settings. Simon Ndirangu Muchohi 29 Oct 2009