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Faculty of Philosophy

Oxford is one of the world's great centres for philosophy. More than one hundred and fifty professional philosophers work in the University and its colleges, between them covering a vast range of subjects within philosophy. Many are international leaders in their fields. The Faculty of Philosophy is one of the largest departments of philosophy in the world, and is widely recognized to be amongst the best.
Its reputation draws many distinguished visiting philosophers; each year around fifty philosophers from around the world give lectures or seminars in Oxford. Almost every major philosopher speaks in Oxford at some time.
Each year, more than five hundred undergraduates are admitted to study philosophy in Oxford, always in combination with another subject. The Faculty also has more than a hundred graduate students, who are either taking a taught graduate degree or working for a doctorate.
Oxford is a collegiate university, and every registered student becomes a member of one of the colleges. In this way, he or she has access, not only to the very extensive libraries and facilities of the University, but also to the varied and more intimate life of a college. Colleges offer their students excellent libraries and facilities of their own.
Teaching at Oxford is by lectures and seminars, and by tutorials or supervisions. Courses of lectures and seminars are offered on a very large range of topics, for both undergraduates and graduates. Tutorials are a special feature of Oxford; undergraduates receive regular and frequent tutorials either individually or in pairs from members of the Faculty. All graduate students also receive frequent individual supervisions.
Oxford University dates from the 12th Century or before. The first colleges were founded in the 13th Century. The ancient buildings remain, mingled with magnificent architecture from subsequent centuries, to make Oxford one of the most inspiring and beautiful cities in the world. Within this setting, Oxford remains at the forefront of philosophy.

Series associated with Faculty of Philosophy

2013 Carnegie-Uehiro-Oxford Ethics Conference: Happiness and Well-Being
Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art lectures
Bio-Ethics Bites
Euthydemus - Platonic Dialogue
From Conscience to Robots: Practical Ethics Workshops
General Philosophy
Global Poverty: Philosophical Questions
Hume's Central Principles
Introduction to David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature Book One
John Locke Lectures in Philosophy
Journal of Practical Ethics
Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
Metaphor: Philosophical Issues
Nietzsche on Mind and Nature
Philosophy - Ethics of the New Biosciences
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy Special Lectures
Power Structuralism in Ancient Ontologies
Practical Ethics Bites
Reid's Critique of Hume
Religious Epistemology, Contextualism, and Pragmatic Encroachment
Science and Religious Conflict Conference
Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Autism and Moral Responsibility: Executive Function and the Reactive Attitudes Professor Richman's talk combines differing theories of models of autism and moral responsibility, and explores the practical implications arising from these ideas. Kenneth Richman 08 Mar 2017
2 The Neuroscience of Moral Agency (Or: How I Learned to Love Determinism and Still Respect Myself in the Morning) In this public lecture, Dr William Casebeer discusses neuroscience, human agency and free will. William Casebeer 23 Feb 2017
3 Euthydemus English Text The Euthydemus of Plato. To read this document, please see 'Download Media' section Christopher Kirwan 15 Feb 2017
4 Creative Commons Humanity’s Collective Ownership of the Earth and Immigration Mathias Risse discusses his recent JPE article 'Humanity’s Collective Ownership of the Earth and Immigration', with David Edmonds. Mathias Risse, David Edmonds 07 Feb 2017
5 Implicit Bias and Racism Paper presented by Neil Levy at the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. Neil Levy 23 Nov 2016
6 The Contribution of Neuroethics for Responsible Management Education Paper presented by José Félix Lozano Aguilar at the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. José Félix Lozano Aguilar 23 Nov 2016
7 Neurointerventions to Prevent Crime and the Problem of Unjustified Incarceration Paper presented by Katrien Devolder at the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. Katrien Devolder 23 Nov 2016
8 The New Problem of Personal Force in Morality Paper presented by Emilian Mihailov at the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. Emilian Mihailov 23 Nov 2016
9 Can we Dissociate Reason from Feelings? Ten Critical Philosophical Questions to Greene's Dual Process Theory Paper presented by Javier Gracia and Andrés Richard at the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. Javier Gracia, Andrés Richard 23 Nov 2016
10 Moral Reasoning is Not Like a Dog's Tail: A Critical Analysis of Social Intuitionism's Two Illusions of Moral Deliberation Paper presented Pedro Jesús Pérez Zafrilla the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. Pedro Jesús Pérez Zafrilla 23 Nov 2016
11 Homo reciprocans from Neuroscience: a limited reciprocity. A criticism from neuroethics Paper presented by Elsa González Esteban at the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. Elsa González Esteban 23 Nov 2016
12 No pain, no praise: motivational enhancement and the meaning of life Paper presented by Julian Savulescu at the MT16 Oxford-Valencia Neuroethics Workshop. Julian Savulescu 23 Nov 2016
13 Uehiro-Carnegie-Oxford Lecture in Practical Ethics 2016 Human Rights, Global Ethics and the Ordinary Virtues Michael Ignatieff 23 Nov 2016
14 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 3: Foundation for Frogs Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the final of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 23 Nov 2016
15 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 2: Deontology for Dogs Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the second of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 23 Nov 2016
16 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 1: Consequentialism for Cows Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the first of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 23 Nov 2016
17 What if Kant were a designer? Constantin Vică presents work in the MT16 Oxford-Bucharest Work in Progress Workshop Constantin Vică 22 Nov 2016
18 Designing for conviviality Cristina Voinea presents work at the MT16 Oxford-Bucharest Work in Progress Workshop. Cristina Voinea 22 Nov 2016
19 Parfitian Survival and Punishing Crimes from the Distant Past Tom Douglas' presentation at the MT16 Oxford- Bucharest Work in Progress Workshop Tom Douglas 22 Nov 2016
20 Creative Commons 2016 Loebel Lectures one day Workshop: Peter Dayan To complement Essi Viding's lectures, Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Peter Dayan 17 Nov 2016
21 Creative Commons 2016 Loebel Lectures one day Workshop: Nikolaus Steinbeis To complement Essi Viding's lectures, Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Nikolaus Steinbeis 17 Nov 2016
22 Creative Commons 2016 Loebel Lectures one day Workshop: Matthew Parrott To complement Essi Viding's lectures, Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Matthew Parrott 17 Nov 2016
23 Creative Commons 2016 Loebel Lectures one day Workshop: Richard Holton To complement Essi Viding's lectures, Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Richard Holton 17 Nov 2016
24 2016 Loebel Lectures one day Workshop: Neil Levy To complement Essi Viding's lectures, Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Neil Levy 17 Nov 2016
25 Creative Commons 2016 Loebel Lectures one day Workshop: Charlotte Cecil To complement Essi Viding's lectures, Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Charlotte Cecil 17 Nov 2016
26 Creative Commons 2016 Loebel Lectures one day Workshop: Eamon McCrory To complement Essi Viding's lectures, Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Eamon McCrory 17 Nov 2016
27 2016 Loebel Lecture 2: Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Professor Essi Viding delivers the second of two talks in the 2016 Loebel Lectures in Psychiatry and Philosophy series Essi Viding 14 Nov 2016
28 2016 Loebel Lecture 1: Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Professor Essi Viding delivers the first of two talks in the 2016 Loebel Lectures in Psychiatry and Philosophy series Essi Viding 14 Nov 2016
29 Creative Commons Offsetting Class Privilege Holly Lawford-Smith discusses her Journal of Practical Ethics article, Offsetting Class Privilege Holly Lawford-Smith, David Edmonds 22 Jul 2016
30 St Cross Seminar: The role of therapeutic optimism in recruitment to a clinical trial: an empirical study In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Dr Nina Hallowell discusses the importance of therapeutic optimism in clinical research. Nina Hallowell 16 May 2016
31 St Cross Seminar: Cognitive Enhancement: Defending the Parity Principle In this episode, Professor Neil Levy assesses objections to cognitive enhancement and argues that the means don't matter from a moral perspective: what matters is how the intervention affects cognition. Neil Levy 17 Mar 2016
32 Creative Commons Leverhulme Lecture 2: Moral Responsibility and Implicit Bias The second of the two 2016 Leverhulme Lectures by Professor Neil Levy on the topic of implicit bias Neil Levy 23 Feb 2016
33 Creative Commons Leverhulme Lecture 1: The Nature and the Significance of Implicit Bias The first of the two 2016 Leverhulme Lectures by Professor Neil Levy on the topic of implicit bias Neil Levy 23 Feb 2016
34 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Temporal Parochialism and Its Discontents The first of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 02 Feb 2016
35 St Cross Seminar: Governing life: is it wrong to intervene in biological processes? In this seminar we explore why human interventions such as euthanasia or use of biotechnologies are controversial. Virginie Tournay 01 Feb 2016
36 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Conservatism, Temporal Bias, and Future Generations The last of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 01 Feb 2016
37 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Reasons to Worry The second of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 01 Feb 2016
38 Conscientious Objection in Healthcare Conference: Roundtable discussion Panel discussion at a conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Katrien Devolder, Richard Sorabji, Jeff McMahan, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong 09 Dec 2015
39 Kant, conscience, and professional roles A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Jeanette Kennett 09 Dec 2015
40 Medicine and morally messy relationships A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Kimberley Brownlee 09 Dec 2015
41 Reasons, moral integrity, and conscientious objection A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Mark Wicclair 09 Dec 2015
42 Two concepts of conscience and their implications for conscience-based refusal A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Steve Clarke 07 Dec 2015
43 Refusing to treat sexual dysfunction in sex offenders A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Tom Douglas 07 Dec 2015
44 Objection to conscience. On good and bad objections in medicine A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Alberto Giubilini 07 Dec 2015
45 My conscience may be my guide, but you may not have to honour it A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Hugh LaFollette 07 Dec 2015
46 Conscientious objection and complicity in wrongdoing A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Francesca Minerva 07 Dec 2015
47 The proper place of conscience and values A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Julian Savulescu 07 Dec 2015
48 Conscientious objection and 'effective referral' A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Roger Trigg 07 Dec 2015
49 Conscientious non-objection and medical dissensus in intensive care A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Dominic Wilkinson 07 Dec 2015
50 We Want Kids, Too: Should Doctors be Allowed to Refuse to Help Gay Couples have Children? A conference on conscientious objection in medicine and the role of conscience in healthcare practitioners’ decision making, Oxford 2015. Walter Sinnott Armstrong, Aaron Ancell 07 Dec 2015
51 2015 Loebel Lecture 3: What is the upshot? The last of three public lectures which took place in Oxford in November 2015. Series title: The theoretical challenge of modern psychiatry: no easy cure Steven Hyman 18 Nov 2015
52 2015 Loebel Lecture 2: Science is quietly, inexorably eroding many core assumptions underlying psychiatry The second of three public lectures which took place in Oxford in November 2015. Series title: The theoretical challenge of modern psychiatry: no easy cure Steven Hyman 18 Nov 2015
53 2015 Loebel Lecture 1: Neurobiological materialism collides with the experience of being human The first of three public lectures which took place in Oxford in November 2015. Series title: The theoretical challenge of modern psychiatry: no easy cure Steven Hyman 18 Nov 2015
54 St Cross Seminar: Justifications for Non-Consensual Medical Intervention: From Infectious Disease Control to Criminal Rehabilitation Dr Jonathan Pugh discusses the morally permissibility of non-consensual medical interventions. Jonathan Pugh 18 Nov 2015
55 Creative Commons Ethical and Social Issues in Shared Virtual Environments Revisited Talk delivered at 2015 Cyberselves Symposium, with contributions from technologists, psychologists, neuroscientists, philosophers and cultural theorists looking at the future societal and ethical impacts of virtual reality and immersive technologies. Ralph Schroeder 16 Nov 2015
56 Creative Commons The Soul of the Machine: The multi-layered structure of a synthetic self Talk delivered at 2015 Cyberselves Symposium, with contributions from technologists, psychologists, neuroscientists, philosophers and cultural theorists looking at the future societal and ethical impacts of virtual reality and immersive technologies Paul Verschure 16 Nov 2015
57 Creative Commons The Smart Mandate: A Brief History of Ubiquitous Computing and Responsive Environments Talk delivered at 2015 Cyberselves Symposium, with contributions from technologists, psychologists, neuroscientists, philosophers and cultural theorists looking at the future societal and ethical impacts of virtual reality and immersive technologies. Orit Halpern 16 Nov 2015
58 Creative Commons Virtually anything goes: what, if any, are the ethical limits on behaviour in virtual worlds? Talk delivered at 2015 Cyberselves Symposium, with contributions from technologists, psychologists, neuroscientists, philosophers and cultural theorists looking at the future societal and ethical impacts of virtual reality and immersive technologies. Blay Whitby 16 Nov 2015
59 Creative Commons Deliberation welcomes prediction Alan Hájek (Australian National University) gives a talk for the New Insights seminar series on 21st May 2015. Alan Hájek 24 Jul 2015
60 Reasoning with Plenitude Roger White (MIT) gives the final talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. Roger White 14 Jul 2015
61 Testimony, Error, and Reasonable Belief in Medieval Religious Epistemology Richard Cross (Notre Dame) gives a talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. The commentator is Christina Van Dyke, Calvin Richard Cross, Christina Van Dyke 14 Jul 2015
62 Fine-Tuning Fine-Tuning John Hawthorne (Oxford/USC) gives a talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. John Hawthorne 14 Jul 2015
63 What is Justified Group Belief Jennifer Lackey (Northwestern) gives a talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. Jennifer Lackey 14 Jul 2015
64 Foundations of the Fine-Tuning Argument Hans Halvorson (Princeton) give a talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. The commentator is John Pittard (Yale). Hans Halvorson, John Pittard 14 Jul 2015
65 How to Appear to Know that God Exists Keith DeRose (Yale), gives a talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. The commentator is Jane Friedman (NYU). Keith DeRose, Jane Friedman 14 Jul 2015
66 Show and Tell Paulina Sliwa (Cambridge) gives the first talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. Paulina Sliwa 14 Jul 2015
67 The Rev’d Mr Bayes and the Life Everlasting Peter van Inwagen (Notre Dame) gives the second talk for the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. The commentator is Jeffrey Sanford Russell (USC). Peter Van Inwagen, Jeffrey Sanford Russell 14 Jul 2015
68 Phenomenal Conservatism and Religious Belief Richard Swinburne, University of Oxford, gives the first talk in the New Insights in Religious Epistemology International Conference, held in Oxford in June 2015. Richard Swinburne 14 Jul 2015
69 Creative Commons Moral Conformity Sinnott-Armstrong is the Chauncey Stillman Professor of Ethics at Duke University. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong 14 Jul 2015
70 Creative Commons Happiness, Unhappiness, and Suffering Hawkins is Associate Research Professor of Philosophy and Trent Scholar in Bioethics at Duke University. Jennifer Hawkins, Jeff McMahan 14 Jul 2015
71 Creative Commons Toward a Naturalistic Theory of Moral Progress Buchanan is James B. Duke Professor of Philosophy at Duke University. Allen Buchanan 14 Jul 2015
72 Creative Commons Can you choose to be gay? Brian Earp discusses the ethics of sexual orientation. Brian Earp, Nigel Warburton, David Edmonds 14 Jul 2015
73 St Cross Seminar: The 'New' Guestworker? Rethinking the Ethics of Temporary Labour Migration Programme This talk probes into the ethical landscape of contemporary TLMPs in liberal democratic states, and examines issues such as migrants' rights. Mimi Zou 10 Jun 2015
74 St Cross Seminar: The moral insignificance of self-consciousness In this talk, Dr Josh Shepherd examines the claim that self-consciousness is highly morally significant. Joshua Shepherd 10 Jun 2015
75 Brain Science and the Military In this talk I explain the nature of national security interest in the burgeoning field of neuroscience and its implications for military and counter-intelligence operations. Jonathan Moreno 17 Apr 2015
76 2015 Wellcome & Loebel Lecture in Neuroethics: Death and the self This lecture investigates changing attitudes and beliefs about the persistence of the self. Shaun Nichols 13 Mar 2015
77 Creative Commons 2015 Leverhulme Lecture (3): Marshmallows and Moderation Is self-control a character trait or should we look to external props for self-control? Neil Levy 10 Mar 2015
78 Creative Commons 2015 Leverhulme Lecture (2): The Science of Self-Control This lecture outlines some of the main perspectives on self-control and its loss stemming from recent work in psychology. Neil Levy 09 Mar 2015
79 Creative Commons 2015 Leverhulme Lecture (1): Self-Control: A problem of self-management Self-control problems typically arise from conflicts between smaller sooner and larger later rewards. Neil Levy 04 Mar 2015
80 Creative Commons St Cross Seminar: On Swearing What, if anything, is wrong with swearing? And, what exactly are we doing when we try to swear inoffensively? Rebecca Roache 23 Feb 2015
81 Skeptical Theism and the Future First talk given by Cameron Domenico Kirk-Giannini (Rutgers) at the New Insights and Directions for Religious Epistemology Workshop on Formal Epistemology and Religious Epistemology, Oxford University, 8 December 2014. Cameron Domenico Kirk-Giannini 09 Feb 2015
82 Foundations for an Accuracy-based Approach to Imprecise Credence Second talk given by Jason Konek (Bristol) and Billy Dunaway (Oxford) at the New Insights and Directions for Religious Epistemology Workshop on Formal Epistemology and Religious Epistemology, Oxford University, 8 December 2014. Jason Konek, Billy Dunaway 09 Feb 2015
83 Divine Indifference, or Whatever Third talk given by Jonathan Weisberg (Toronto) at the New Insights and Directions for Religious Epistemology Workshop on Formal Epistemology and Religious Epistemology, Oxford University, 8 December 2014. Jonathan Weisberg 09 Feb 2015
84 Against the Orthodoxy: Rethinking Epistemic Reasons and Pascal's Wager Fourth talk given by Rima Basu (USC) at the New Insights and Directions for Religious Epistemology Workshop on Formal Epistemology and Religious Epistemology, Oxford University, 9 December 2014. Rima Basu 09 Feb 2015
85 Salvaging Pascal's Wager Fifth talk given by Liz Jackson (Nortre Dame) at the New Insights and Directions for Religious Epistemology Workshop on Formal Epistemology and Religious Epistemology, Oxford University, 9 December 2014. Liz Jackson 09 Feb 2015
86 Updating on Evil Sixth and final talk given by Professor Roger White (MIT) at the New Insights and Directions for Religious Epistemology Workshop Formal Epistemology and Religious Epistemology, Oxford University, 9 December 2014. Roger White 06 Feb 2015
87 Creative Commons St Cross Seminar: Mere Practicality? Infants, interests and the value of life Dr Richard Hain, Consultant in Paediatric Palliative Medicine, explores the difficulties in rationally explaining the value of an infant’s life. Richard Hain 04 Feb 2015
88 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (3): The Question of Legal Rights for Animals In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 05 Dec 2014
89 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (2): The Moral Standing of Animals In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 05 Dec 2014
90 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (1): Animals, Human Beings, and Persons In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 05 Dec 2014
91 St Cross Seminar: Natural Human Rights: A Theory This talk explores the central argument in Boylan's recent book, 'Natural Human Rights: A Theory' Michael Boylan 03 Dec 2014
92 Bioethics and the Burden of Proof In this paper we critique a kind of argument very common in bioethical debates, in which a proponent provides a prima facie case for a particular conclusion, then claims that the burden of proof is on those that object to that conclusion. Michael Selgelid 14 Nov 2014
93 Implicit Moral Attitudes Research shows that implicit moral attitudes affect our thinking and behavior. This talk reports new psychological and neuroscientific research and explores potential implications for scientific moral psychology as well as for some philosophical theories. Walter Sinnott-Armstrong 14 Nov 2014
94 The ethics of sexuality Professor Janet Radcliffe Richards argues that homosexuality is natural, and that what is natural can be neither good nor bad. Janet Radcliffe Richards, Nigel Warburton, David Edmonds 04 Nov 2014
95 Should we allow genetic engineering on embryos? Does a human embryo have moral status? Tom Douglas explores the ethical issues surrounding genetic research on developing embryos. Tom Douglas, Nigel Warburton, David Edmonds 28 Oct 2014
96 Is there such a thing as a just war? Is an ethical war a paradoxical notion? If violence is almost always unacceptable, how can we justify acts of war? Jeff McMahan, Nigel Warburton, David Edmonds 21 Oct 2014
97 The Dappled Causal World of Psychiatric Disorders: The Link Between the Classification of Psychiatric Disorders and Their Causal Complexity The second of the 2014 Loebel Lectures in Philosophy and Psychiatry, by Professor Kenneth S Kendler Kenneth S Kendler 21 Oct 2014
98 The Genetic Epidemiology of Psychiatric and Substance Abuse Disorders: Multiple Levels, Interactions and Causal Loops The first of the 2014 Loebel Lectures in Philosophy and Psychiatry, by Professor Kenneth S Kendler Kenneth S Kendler 16 Oct 2014
99 The rights and wrongs of abortion Rebecca Roache discusses the conflicting rights and interests of both foetus and mother. Rebecca Roache, Nigel Warburton, David Edmonds 14 Oct 2014
100 Creative Commons Choosing the sex of your child Is sex-selection harmful or injust? Julian Savulescu outlines four methods used in sex-selection and explores the ethical issues surrounding each. Julian Savulescu, Nigel Warburton, David Edmonds 06 Oct 2014