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Faculty of Philosophy

Oxford is one of the world's great centres for philosophy. More than one hundred and fifty professional philosophers work in the University and its colleges, between them covering a vast range of subjects within philosophy. Many are international leaders in their fields. The Faculty of Philosophy is one of the largest departments of philosophy in the world, and is widely recognized to be amongst the best.
Its reputation draws many distinguished visiting philosophers; each year around fifty philosophers from around the world give lectures or seminars in Oxford. Almost every major philosopher speaks in Oxford at some time.
Each year, more than five hundred undergraduates are admitted to study philosophy in Oxford, always in combination with another subject. The Faculty also has more than a hundred graduate students, who are either taking a taught graduate degree or working for a doctorate.
Oxford is a collegiate university, and every registered student becomes a member of one of the colleges. In this way, he or she has access, not only to the very extensive libraries and facilities of the University, but also to the varied and more intimate life of a college. Colleges offer their students excellent libraries and facilities of their own.
Teaching at Oxford is by lectures and seminars, and by tutorials or supervisions. Courses of lectures and seminars are offered on a very large range of topics, for both undergraduates and graduates. Tutorials are a special feature of Oxford; undergraduates receive regular and frequent tutorials either individually or in pairs from members of the Faculty. All graduate students also receive frequent individual supervisions.
Oxford University dates from the 12th Century or before. The first colleges were founded in the 13th Century. The ancient buildings remain, mingled with magnificent architecture from subsequent centuries, to make Oxford one of the most inspiring and beautiful cities in the world. Within this setting, Oxford remains at the forefront of philosophy.

Series associated with Faculty of Philosophy

2013 Carnegie-Uehiro-Oxford Ethics Conference: Happiness and Well-Being
Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art lectures
Bio-Ethics Bites
David Hume (2018)
Ethics in AI
Euthydemus - Platonic Dialogue
From Conscience to Robots: Practical Ethics Workshops
General Philosophy
Global Poverty: Philosophical Questions
Hume's Central Principles
Introduction to David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature Book One
John Locke Lectures in Philosophy
Journal of Practical Ethics
Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
Metaphor: Philosophical Issues
Nietzsche on Mind and Nature
Philosophical perspectives on the causes of mental illness
Philosophy - Ethics of the New Biosciences
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy Special Lectures
Power Structuralism in Ancient Ontologies
Practical Ethics Bites
Reid's Critique of Hume
Religious Epistemology, Contextualism, and Pragmatic Encroachment
Science and Religious Conflict Conference
The View from Above: Structure, Emergence, and Causation
Thinking Out Loud: leading philosophers discuss topical global issues
Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics
Uehiro Lectures: Practical solutions for ethical challenges
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Creative Commons Hume 2018 Handouts PDF handouts to accompany Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
2 Creative Commons Hume 2018 Slides PDF slides to accompany Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
3 Creative Commons Hume 2018/8: Sceptical Crisis and Second Thoughts Lecture 8 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
4 Creative Commons Hume 2018/7: Scepticism about Body, Soul and Self Lecture 7 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
5 Creative Commons Hume 2018/6: Causal Interpretation, to Scepticism Lecture 6 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
6 Creative Commons Hume 2018/5: Probability and the Idea of Necessity Lecture 5 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
7 Creative Commons Hume 2018/4: Induction and Belief Lecture 4 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
8 Creative Commons Hume 2018/3: Faculties and Relations, to Causation Lecture 3 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
9 Creative Commons Hume 2018/2: Ideas, Impressions, and Abstraction Lecture 2 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
10 Creative Commons Hume 2018/1: Hume’s Background and Chief Aims Lecture 1 in Peter Millican's 2018 Hume series. Peter Millican 21 May 2020
11 Creative Commons Medically Assisted Dying in Canada: from where we’ve come; to where we’re heading In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Professor Arthur Schafer outlines the current contours of the Canadian euthanasia debate. Arthur Schafer 11 May 2020
12 Creative Commons Is it morally permissible for healthcare workers to stop working if they lack protective equipment? Katrien Devolder interviews Udo Schüklenk. Udo Schuklenk, Katrien Devolder 23 Apr 2020
13 Creative Commons Is the coronavirus pandemic worse for women? An interview with Dr Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra. Agomoni Ganguli-Mitra, Katrien Devolder 21 Apr 2020
14 Creative Commons Triage in an Italian ICU During the Coronavirus Pandemic An interview with Dr Marco Vergano. Marco Vergano, Katrien Devolder 20 Apr 2020
15 Creative Commons What caused the coronavirus pandemic? An interview with Professor Peter Singer. Peter Singer, Katrien Devolder 20 Apr 2020
16 Why is mental healthcare so ethically confusing? Clinicians and institutions from an anthropological perspective In this talk, Neil Armstrong uses ethnographic material of NHS mental healthcare to raise some questions about autonomy, risk and personal and institutional responsibility. Neil Armstrong 17 Feb 2020
17 3f. Values and AI: view from public policy Jo Wolff and Vafa Ghazavi, Blavatnik School of Government, gives the sixth and final talk in the third Ethics in AI seminar, held on February 10th 2020. Jo Wolff, Vafa Ghazavi 10 Feb 2020
18 3e. AI and business Alan Morrison, Saïd Business School, gives the fifth talk in the third Ethics in AI seminar, held on February 10th 2020. Alan Morrison 10 Feb 2020
19 3d. AI and finance Nir Vulkan, Saïd Business School, gives the fourth talk in the third Ethics in AI seminar, held on February 10th 2020. Nir Vulkan 10 Feb 2020
20 3c. Population health and AI: efficiency, accuracy and trust Angeliki Kerasidou, Ethox Centre, gives the third talk in the third Ethics in AI seminar, held on February 10th 2020. Angeliki Kerasidou 10 Feb 2020
21 3b. AI in healthcare Claire Bloomfield, National Consortium of Intelligent Medical Imaging, gives the second talk in the third Ethics in AI seminar, held on February 10th 2020. Claire Bloomfield 10 Feb 2020
22 3a. Rethinking ethics and humanities for the 21st Century Mike Parker, Wellcome Centre for Ethics and Humanities gives the first talk in the third Ethics in AI seminar, held on February 10th 2020. Mike Parker 10 Feb 2020
23 2e. Artificial Intelligence and the news Rasmus Kleis Nielsen, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism, gives the fifth talk in the second Ethics in AI seminar, held on January 27th 2020 (postponed from December 2nd 2019). Rasmus Kleis Nielsen 27 Jan 2020
24 2d. Computational propaganda Video Narayanan, Oxford Internet Institute, Video Narayanan 27 Jan 2020
25 2c. Use, users and the social context for AI Gina Neff, Oxford Internet Institute, gives the third talk in the second Ethics in AI seminar, held on January 27th 2020 (postponed from December 2nd 2019). Gina Neff 27 Jan 2020
26 2b. Capital, labour and power in the age of automation Carl Benedikt Frey gives the second talk in the second Ethics in AI seminar, held on January 27th 2020 (postponed from December 2nd 2019). Carl Benedikt Frey 27 Jan 2020
27 2a. AI Governance and Ethics  Allan Dafoe and Carina Prunkl, Future of Humanity Institute, Faculty of Philosophy give the first talk in the second Ethics in AI seminar, held on January 27th 2020 (postponed from December 2nd 2019). Allan Dafoe, Carina Prunkl 27 Jan 2020
28 A discussion of ethical challenges posed by AI, involving experts from fields across Oxford - Seminar 1 An introduction by Professor Sir Nigel Shadbolt; The place of Ethics in AI, AI Ethics and legal regulation, Ethics of AI in healthcare Tom Douglas, Carissa Véliz, Vicki Nash, Sandra Wachter 20 Jan 2020
29 Creative Commons Hornless Cattle - is Gene Editing the Best Solution? In this talk, Prof. Peter Sandøe argues that, from an ethical viewpoint, gene editing is the best solution to produce hornless cattle. There are, however, regulatory hurdles. Peter Sandøe 02 Dec 2019
30 Creative Commons Blockchain, consent and prosent for medical research Respecting patients' autonomy is increasingly important in the digital age, yet researchers have raised concerns over the barriers of access to medical data useful for data-driven medical research. Sebastian Porsdam Mann 13 Nov 2019
31 1h. Ethics of AI in healthcare Jess Morley, Oxford Internet Institute, gives the eigth talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Jess Morley 11 Nov 2019
32 1g. Ethics and AI at the Oxford Big Data Institute Gil McVean, Big Data Institute, gives the seventh talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Gil McVean 11 Nov 2019
33 1f. Re-uniting ethics and the law for AI Brent Mittelstadt, Oxford Internet Institute, gives the sixth talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Brent Mittelstadt 11 Nov 2019
34 1e. When AI disrupts the law Sandra Wachter, Oxford Internet Institute, gives the fifth talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Sandra Wachter 11 Nov 2019
35 1d. AI ethics and legal regulation Vicki Nash, Oxford Internet Institute gives the fourth talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Vicki Nash 11 Nov 2019
36 1c. AI-ethics research at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, Faculty of Philosophy Tom Douglas, Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, Faculty of Philosophy gives the third talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Tom Douglas 11 Nov 2019
37 1b. The place of philosophy in the ethics of AI Carissa Véliz, Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics, gives the second talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Carissa Véliz 11 Nov 2019
38 1a. Background and Aims of the Institute for Ethics in AI  Nigel Shadbolt, Principal of Jesus College, Department of Computer Science, gives the first talk in the first Ethics in AI seminar, held on November 11th 2019. Nigel Shadbolt 11 Nov 2019
39 Creative Commons Genetic Selection and Enhancement Professor Julian Savulescu and Dr Katrien Devolder discuss the use of genetic testing to select which children to bring into the world. Julian Savulescu, Katrien Devolder 04 Nov 2019
40 Creative Commons 2019 Uehiro Lectures (3/3): Improving Political Discourse (2): Communicating moral concern beyond blaming and shaming Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face t Elizabeth Anderson 17 Oct 2019
41 Creative Commons 2019 Uehiro Lectures (2/3): Improving Political Discourse (1): Re-learning how to talk about facts across group identities Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face t Elizabeth Anderson 17 Oct 2019
42 Creative Commons 2019 Uehiro Lectures (1/3): What Has Gone Wrong? Populist politics and the mobilization of fear and resentment Lies, propaganda, and fake news have hijacked political discourse, distracting the electorate from engaging with the global problems we face. These Uehiro Lectures suggest a pathway for democratic institutions to devise solutions to the problems we face. Elizabeth Anderson 17 Oct 2019
43 From Eugenics to Human Gene Editing: Engineering Life in China in a Global Context In November 2018, a Chinese scientist announced the birth of the world’s first gene-edited babies and sparked outrage across the world. Professor Nie considers how China's complex socio-ethical approach paved the way for this controversial experiment. Jing-Bao Nie 07 Oct 2019
44 Creative Commons Freedom of Political Communication, Propaganda and the Role of Epistemic Institutions in Cyberspace Professor Seumas Miller defines fake news, hate speech and propaganda, discusses the relationship between social media and political propaganda. Seumas Miller 20 Jun 2019
45 One Minute in Haditha: Neuroscience, Emotion and Military Ethics In this special lecture, Professor Mitt Regan discusses the latest research in moral perception and judgment, and the potential implications of this research for ethics education in general and military ethics training in particular. Mitt Regan 19 Jun 2019
46 Creative Commons Religion, War and Terrorism In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Professor Tony Coady argues that religion does not have an inherent tendency towards violence, including particularly war and terrorism. Professor Tony Coady 01 May 2019
47 Creative Commons The Ethics of Stress, Resilience, and Moral Injury Among Police and Military Personnel Professor Seumas Miller sets out how the use of lethal and coercive forces may erode moral character and cause moral injury. Seumas Miller 26 Mar 2019
48 Is there a Moral Problem with the Gig Economy? Is 'gig work' exploitative and injust? In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Daniel Halliday examines the common concerns from an ethical perspective. Daniel Halliday 04 Mar 2019
49 Creative Commons The Salvation Agenda: The Politics of Medical Humanitarianism During Zimbabwe's Cholera Outbreak 2008/09 In this New St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Simukai Chigudu examines the humanitarian politics of responding to the most catastrophic cholera outbreak in African history. Simukai Chigudu 12 Feb 2019
50 Creative Commons Rationing antibiotics in the face of drug resistance: ethical challenges, principles and pathways Practical medical ethics symposium: Rationing responsibly in an age of austerity Christian Munthe 22 Nov 2018
51 Allocating organs: the US approach Practical medical ethics symposium: Rationing responsibly in an age of austerity. Thaddeus Mason Pope 22 Nov 2018
52 Creative Commons Cost-equivalence: rethinking treatment allocation Practical medical ethics symposium: Rationing responsibly in an age of austerity Julian Savulescu 22 Nov 2018
53 Creative Commons Moralising medicine: is it ethical to allocate treatment based on responsibility for illness? Practical medical ethics symposium: Rationing responsibly in an age of austerity Rebecca Brown 22 Nov 2018
54 Creative Commons Allocating intensive care beds and balancing ethical values Practical medical ethics symposium: Rationing responsibly in an age of austerity Dominic Wilkinson 22 Nov 2018
55 Political Bioethics How should members of a liberal democratic political community, open to value pluralism, decide bioethical issues that generate deep disagreement? Benjamin Gregg 06 Nov 2018
56 Global Legal Epidemiology: Developing a Science Around Whether, When and How International Law Can Address Global Challenges Professor Steven Hoffman discusses legal mechanisms available for coordinating international responses to transnational problems, their prospects, and their challenges. Steven J Hoffman 23 Oct 2018
57 Fake News and the Politics of Truth Fake news spread online is a clear danger to democratic politics. One aspect of that danger is obvious: it spreads misinformation. But other aspects, less often discussed, is that it also spreads confusion and undermines trust. Michael Lynch 08 Oct 2018
58 Minds Without Spines: Toward a More Comprehensive Animal Ethics In this OUC-WEH Joint Seminar, Irina Mikhalevich argues that the moral status of invertebrate animals is often overlooked, and sets out why animal ethics should be more inclusive and comprehensive. Irina Mikhalevich 19 Jun 2018
59 Rethinking 'Disease': A Fresh Diagnosis and a New Philosophical Treatment In this OUC-WEH Joint Seminar, Russell Powell explores the concept of 'disease' Russell Powell 19 Jun 2018
60 Cost-benefit analysis In this special lecture, Professor Matt Adler argues that social welfare function is a better methodology than cost-benefit analysis. Professor Matthew Adler 11 Jun 2018
61 Sleep softly: Ethics, Schubert and the value of dying well An inter-disciplinary collaboration on music, mortality and ethics. Dominic Wilkinson 08 Jun 2018
62 2018 Annual Uehiro Lectures (3/3): Illness and Attitude Lecture 3 of 3.Who we are depends in part on the social world in which we live. In these lectures I look at some consequences for three mental health problems, broadly construed: dementia, addiction, and psychosomatic illness. Richard Holton 05 Jun 2018
63 2018 Annual Uehiro Lectures (2/3): Addiction, Desire and the Polluted Environment Lecture 2 of 3. Who we are depends in part on the social world in which we live. In these lectures I look at some consequences for three mental health problems, broadly construed: dementia, addiction, and psychosomatic illness. Richard Holton 05 Jun 2018
64 2018 Annual Uehiro Lectures (1/3): Dementia and the Social Scaffold of Memory Lecture 1 of 3. Who we are depends in part on the social world in which we live. In these lectures I look at some consequences for three mental health problems, broadly construed: dementia, addiction, and psychosomatic illness. Richard Holton 05 Jun 2018
65 The Future of Mobility: How and why will we transport ourselves in the next decades Digitisation has entered the mobility arena. The car has evolved from a mechanical device into a “data producing embedded software platform”, and the internet is quickly linking the supply and demand to effectively fulfil our transport needs. Carlo van de Weijer 21 May 2018
66 Modal Epistemology and the Formal Identity of Intellect and Object A defence of the Formal Identity Thesis and of the immateriality of the human intellect, based on specifically epistemological arguments about our knowledge of necessary or essential truths, including especially essential truths about value. Robert Koons 27 Feb 2018
67 Hylomorphism, natural science, mind and God Howard Robinson argues that the early moderns were right to think that Aristotelian or scholastic hylomorphism was inconsistent with modern science. Howard Robinson 27 Feb 2018
68 Dependent Powerful Qualities and Grounded Downward Causation David Yates argues that some physically realised qualitative properties have their causal roles solely in virtue of being the qualities they are, and not in virtue of the powers bestowed by their physical realizers on a given occasion. David yates 27 Feb 2018
69 A Biologically Informed Hylomorphism Utilising recent advances in developmental biology, Christopher Austin argues that the hylomorphic framework is an empirically adequate and conceptually rich explanatory schema with which to model the nature of organisms. Christopher J Austin 27 Feb 2018
70 Hylomorphic Structure, Emergence, and Supervenience William Jaworski argues why the hylomorphic structure is the best (and perhaps only) thing that can explain the persistence of individuals that change their matter over time. William Jaworski 27 Feb 2018
71 Brain-machine interfaces and the translation of thought into action In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Dr Tom Buller reflects on the causal relationship between movement goals and bodily awareness and challenges the idea that BMI-enabled movement and intentional bodily movement are equal actions. Tom Buller 19 Feb 2018
72 Creative Commons Collective inaction and group-based ignorance In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Anne Schwenkebecher discusses morally wrongful collective inaction and the problem of group-based ignorance. Anne Schwekenbecher 06 Feb 2018
73 2017 Annual Uehiro Lecture (3/3) Obligations to the Needy: Some Empirical Worries and Uncomfortable Philosophical Possibilities In this final lecture, Professor Temkin considers possible negative impacts of global efforts to aid the needy, and reviews the main claims and arguments of all three Lectures Larry Temkin 13 Nov 2017
74 2017 Annual Uehiro Lecture (2/3) Obligations to the Needy: Singer’s Pond Example versus Supporting International Aid Organizations—Some Disanalogies and Their Normative Significance In this second lecture, Professor Temkin considers some disanalogies between saving a drowning child and giving to an aid organization, and discusses the issues of corruption and poor governance. Larry Temkin 13 Nov 2017
75 2017 Annual Uehiro Lecture (1/3) Obligations to the Needy: Effective Altruism, Pluralism, and Singer’s Pond Example In this first lecture, Larry Temkin explores different philosophical approaches to aiding the needy, and how they may fit with Peter Singer's famous Pond Example thought experiment. Larry Temkin 13 Nov 2017
76 Sacred Values and the Sanctity of Life OUC-Ethox Seminar. Steve Clarke discusses Ronald Dworkin's account of sacred values in his work 'Life's Dominion' and furthers the argument that the assertion 'life is sacred' is tenable by both liberals and conservatives. Steve Clarke 13 Nov 2017
77 On Moral Experts A St Cross Special Ethics Seminar. Professor John-Stewart Gordon focusses on the question of whether moral experts must follow their own expert advice in order to remain experts. John-Stewart Gordon 13 Nov 2017
78 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Reasons to Worry The second of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 06 Nov 2017
79 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Conservatism, Temporal Bias, and Future Generations The last of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 06 Nov 2017
80 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Temporal Parochialism and Its Discontents The first of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 06 Nov 2017
81 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 1: Consequentialism for Cows Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the first of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 06 Nov 2017
82 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 2: Deontology for Dogs Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the second of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 06 Nov 2017
83 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 3: Foundation for Frogs Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the final of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 06 Nov 2017
84 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (3): The Question of Legal Rights for Animals In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 24 Aug 2017
85 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (2): The Moral Standing of Animals In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 24 Aug 2017
86 Creative Commons 2014 Uehiro Lecture (1): Animals, Human Beings, and Persons In these lectures I will raise some fundamental questions about the moral and legal standing of the other animals: the basis of our moral obligations to them, and whether it makes sense to think that animals might have legal rights. Christine M. Korsgaard 24 Aug 2017
87 Creative Commons 2013 Annual Uehiro Lecture (3): Equal Opportunity Third and final lecture from Professor Tim Scanlon in which he talks about the philosophical justifications for equalitiy of opportunity. Includes a roundtable discussion with Professors John Broome, Janet Radcliffe Richards and David Miller Tim Scanlon, John Broome, Janet Radcliffe-Richards, David Miller 24 Aug 2017
88 Creative Commons 2013 Annual Uehiro Lecture (2): Equal Status In the second of three podcasts, Professor Tim Scanlon (Harvard University) delivers the second 2013 Annual Uehiro Lecture in the lecture series "When Does Equality Matter?" Tim Scanlon 24 Aug 2017
89 2013 Annual Uehiro Lecture (1): Equal Treatment In the first of three podcasts, Professor Tim Scanlon (Harvard University) delivers the first 2013 Annual Uehiro Lecture in the lecture series "When Does Equality Matter?" Tim Scanlon 24 Aug 2017
90 Creative Commons Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture Three: Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012 Third and final lecture from the 2012 Oxford Uehiro lectures in Practical Philosophy given be Professor Janet Radcliffe-Richards. Janet Radcliffe-Richards 24 Aug 2017
91 Creative Commons Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture Two:Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012 Second lecture in the 2012 Uehiro Lecture series 'Sex in A Shifting Landscape'. Janet Radcliffe-Richards 24 Aug 2017
92 Creative Commons Sex in a Shifting Landscape Lecture One: Oxford Uehiro Lectures 2012 Professor Janet Radcliffe-Richards gives (OUC Distinguished Research Fellow) gives the first of three lectures on feminism for the Uehiro Practical Ethics lecture series. Janet Radcliffe-Richards 24 Aug 2017
93 Making Good 3: Virtues, laws and consequentialism Third of three lectures by in the 2011 Annual Uehiro Lecture Series "Making Good: The Challenge of Robustly Demanding Values". Delivered by Philip Pettit, Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values at Princeton University. Philip Pettit 24 Aug 2017
94 Making Good 2: Robust Demands and the Need for Law Second of three lectures by in the 2011 Annual Uehiro Lecture Series "Making Good: The Challenge of Robustly Demanding Values". Delivered by Philip Pettit, Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values at Princeton University. Philip Pettit 24 Aug 2017
95 Making Good 1: Robust Demands and the Need for Virtue First of three lectures in the 2011 Annual Uehiro Lecture Series "Making Good: The Challenge of Robustly Demanding Values". Delivered by Philip Pettit, Laurance S. Rockefeller University Professor of Politics and Human Values at Princeton University. Philip Pettit 24 Aug 2017
96 2015 Welcome & Loebel Lecture in Neuroethics: Death and the self This lecture investigates changing attitudes and beliefs about the persistence of the self. Shaun Nichols 23 Aug 2017
97 2015 Loebel Lecture 1: Neurobiological materialism collides with the experience of being human The first of three public lectures which took place in Oxford in November 2015. Series title: The theoretical challenge of modern psychiatry: no easy cure Steven Hyman 23 Aug 2017
98 2015 Loebel Lecture 2: Science is quietly, inexorably eroding many core assumptions underlying psychiatry The second of three public lectures which took place in Oxford in November 2015. Series title: The theoretical challenge of modern psychiatry: no easy cure Steven Hyman 23 Aug 2017
99 2015 Loebel Lecture 3: What is the upshot? The last of three public lectures which took place in Oxford in November 2015. Series title: The theoretical challenge of modern psychiatry: no easy cure Steven Hyman 23 Aug 2017
100 2016 Loebel Lecture 1: Developmental risk and resilience: The challenge of translating multi-level data to concrete interventions Professor Essi Viding delivers the first of two talks in the 2016 Loebel Lectures in Psychiatry and Philosophy series Essi Viding 23 Aug 2017