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Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS)

The Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS) Division is one of the four academic divisions of the University of Oxford. We have over 6,000 students and research staff, and generate over half of our funding from external research grants.
The MPLS Division's 10 departments and 3 interdisciplinary units span the full spectrum of the mathematical, computational, physical, engineering and life sciences, and undertake both fundamental research and cutting-edge applied work. Our research addresses major societal and technological challenges and is increasingly interdisciplinary in nature. We collaborate closely with colleagues in Oxford across the medical sciences, social sciences and humanities.
Today's scientific research not only crosses traditional subject boundaries, but also transcends national boundaries: MPLS scientists collaborate with researchers from around the world, and play leading roles in many international projects.

Series associated with Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS)

A Mathematician's Holiday
Ada Lovelace Symposium - Celebrating 200 Years of a Computer Visionary
Astrophysics: An Introduction
Big Questions - with Oxford Sparks
Building a Business: Moving Your Product to the Market
Caging Schrödinger's Cat - Quantum Nanotechnology
Careers in Chemistry: Academia
Careers in Chemistry: Beyond Academia
Chemistry for the Future: Clean Energy
Chemistry for the Future: Human Health
Chemistry for the Future: Incredible Machines
Chemistry for the Future: Meet the Scientists
Chemistry for the Future: Solar Fuels
Chemistry for the Future: Strange Substances and Structures
Chemistry Spotlight Lectures
Christmas Science Lectures
Computer Science
Cultural Heritage Forum
Darwin 200
Department of Engineering Science Centenary Lectures
Department of Engineering Science Lectures
Department of Materials
Department of Physics
Department of Statistics
Earth Sciences
Exploring Spoken Word Data in Oral History Archives
Inside Oxford Science
Lab, Camera, Action!
Mathematical Institute
Open Science
Oxford Physics Alumni
Oxford Physics Public Lectures
Oxford Sparks: bringing science to life
Particle Physics (Alan Barr)
Physics and Philosophy: Arguments, Experiments and a Few Things in Between
Physics Flash Talks
Quantum Mechanics
Reduced Density Matrices in Quantum Physics and Role of Fermionic Exchange Symmetry
Scientific Computing for DPhil Students
So you want to study Chemistry?
Stargazing
Study Skills
Sutton Trust Chemistry Summer School
The Hinshelwood Lectures: Bioinspired Materials
The Medtronic Lectures in Biomedical Engineering
The Oxford Solid State Basics
The Physics of Fine-Tuning
The Secrets of Mathematics
The World of Art
Theoretical Physics - From Outer Space to Plasma
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 The Sound of Symmetry Symmetry has played a role both for composers and in the creation of musical instruments. Marcus shows how composers have used this symmetry and demonstrates how Ernst Chladni revealed extraordinary symmetrical shapes in the vibrations of a metal Plate. Marcus du Sautoy 24 May 2017
2 Creative Commons Will future communications technologies lead to cyber wars or a better world? Communications technology has enabled massive social change over the past decades. However, the many benefits that we enjoy are accompanied by challenges - cyber security, inadequate coverage, the ease of spreading fake news, Naomi Climer 22 May 2017
3 Creative Commons Wireless Communications Using Light In this lecture, Dominic O'Brien introduces the field, the challenges, and the promise for the future of this area of research. Dominic O'Brien 22 May 2017
4 Creative Commons Network Complexity and the Internet of Things In this talk, Justin Coon explores the issue of complexity in the IoT from a fundamental perspective and provide some insight into what this means for practical deployments in the future. Justin Coon 22 May 2017
5 Lecture 6: Bioinspired Colloidal Assembly: From Photonics to Encryption The sixth lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series. Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
6 Lecture 5: Everything SLIPS: A New Concept in Anti-biofouling Materials The fifth lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
7 Lecture 4: Hydrophobicity, Superhydrophobicity, Omniphobicity and Slippery Surfaces The fourth lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
8 Lecture 3: Actuated "spiny" Surfaces a la Echinoderms: En Route for Adaptive Materials The third lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series. Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
9 Lecture 2: Rationally Designed Complex 3D Microarchitectures The second lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
10 Lecture 1: Bio-inspired approaches to crystal design The first lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series. Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
11 The Butterfly Effect - What Does it Really Signify? Tim Palmer discusses Ed Lorenz the man and his work, and compares and contrasts the meaning of the “Butterfly Effect" as most people understand it today, and as Lorenz himself intended it to mean. Tim Palmer 18 May 2017
12 Exploring the very early universe with gravitational waves John March-Russell gives a talk about gravitational wave signals of stringy physics, a ‘soundscape’ connected to the landscape of string vacua. John March-Russell 10 May 2017
13 The birth of gravitational wave astronomy Subir Sarkar reviews the detection of the ‘chirrup’ signal from a pair of merging massive black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, as well as subsequent experimental developments. Subir Sarkar 10 May 2017
14 From action at a distance to gravitational waves James Binney gives a talk about the mathematics that describe Gravitational waves. James Binney 10 May 2017
15 How open should open data be? Open data impacts everybody. Through it we can access healthcare services, understand our governments better and, of course, travel to places more easily. But, how open should open data be? Sir Nigel Shadbolt 04 May 2017
16 Curiosity’s Search for Ancient Habitable Environments at Gale Crater, Mars 4th Annual Lobanov-Rostovsky Lecture in Planetary Geology delivered by Professor John Grotzinger, Caltech, USA John Grotzinger 27 Apr 2017
17 The Origins and Evolution of Exoplanet Atmospheres and Oceans 3rd Annual Lobanov-Rostovsky Lecture in Planetary Geology delivered by Professor Raymond T Pierrehumbert. Raymond T Pierrehumbert 27 Apr 2017
18 Curiosity’s Search for Ancient Habitable Environments at Gale Crater, Mars 4th Annual Lobanov-Rostovsky Lecture in Planetary Geology delivered by Professor John Grotzinger, Caltech, USA John Grotzinger 27 Apr 2017
19 Spatio-temporal Optical Vortices Physics Colloquium 10th March 2017 delivered by Professor Howard Milchberg, University of Maryland, USA Howard Milchberg 27 Apr 2017
20 Learning new physics from a medieval thinker: Big Bangs and Rainbows Physics Colloquium 24 February 2017 delivered by Professor Tom McLeish FRS, Department of Physics and Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Durham University, UK Tom McLeish 27 Apr 2017
21 The applied side of Bell nonlocality Physics Colloquium 17 February 2016 delivered by Professor Valerio Scarani Valerio Scarani 27 Apr 2017
22 What does Hollywood get right and wrong when science is in the storyline? What does hollywood get right? Neil Ashton, Colin Wilson, Eleanor Stride, Jason Nurse 19 Apr 2017
23 Should I take a selfie with a wild animal? Travel companies around the world profit from some of the cruellest types of wildlife tourist attractions on earth. Tom Moorhouse 11 Apr 2017
24 The Beauty of Flavour - Latest results from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider Physics Colloquium 3 February 2017 delivered by Professor Val Gibson, Cambridge Val Gibson 05 Apr 2017
25 From Materials to Cosmology: Studying the early universe under the microscope Physics Colloquium 27 January 2017 delivered by Professor Nicola Spaldin, ETH Zurich Nicola Spaldin 05 Apr 2017
26 The New Era in Observational Cosmology In the fourth part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin conjecture about the future of inflation. They talk about the potential for new evidence for and against the theory, and the variety of new probes into our cosmological environment. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
27 When is a theory good enough? In the third part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin talk about whether one should look for a deeper physical theory when one’s current theory is well-supported by observation. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
28 Can we measure naturalness? In the second part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin consider ways to build the naturalness of an inflationary model into our expectations for observing it. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
29 An Encyclopedia of Inflation In the first part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin talk about the variety of inflationary models. They discuss methods for distinguishing between them based on evidence and describe the application of Bayesian statistics to inflation. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
30 Inflation in the Future What should we expect to learn in the future? In the fourth part of their chat, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger talk about how we expect inflationary theory to develop, and how observations may lead to new physics in this area. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
31 Strings, Inflation, and Alternatives In the third part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger explain the relationship between string theory and inflationary models. Can inflation arise from particle physics, or do we need to look for alternative models? David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
32 Inflation Predicts In the second part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger tell us what inflation predicts and whether inflation itself seems fine-tuned. This discussion was conducted at the University of Oxford on March 14, 2017. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
33 Evidence For Inflation In the first part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger go over our evidence for inflationary theories and discuss how inflationary models improve on the hot big bang. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
34 Panel on Inflation Professor Joe Silk talks with Professor Robert Brandenberger, Professor Jerome Martin, and Dr. Dave Sloan about the current state of research and controversies surrounding inflation. Joe Silk, Robert Brandenberger, Jerome Martin, David Sloan 04 Apr 2017
35 Does Inflationary Cosmology Solve Fine-Tuning Problems? Professor Robert Brandenberger (McGill) argues that inflationary models still face considerable challenges. Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
36 Inflationary Attractors Dr David Sloan (Oxford) discusses the for inflation to occur given typical initial conditions. He argues that, on the right understanding of the background dynamics of the universe, inflationary conditions dominate. David Sloan 04 Apr 2017
37 Inflation After Planck Professor Jerome Martin (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris) explains the current state of evidence for inflationary models. Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
38 Redder is better! Exploring the universe with the successor to Hubble Rebecca Bowler, University of Oxford give a talk about the successor to the Hubble telescope - The James Webb Space Telescope - which will detect infrared radiation. Rebecca Bowler 28 Mar 2017
39 Creative Commons On the trail of the most energetic particles in the universe Rafael Alves Batista, University of Oxford, gives a talk about cosmic rays. Rafael Alves Batista 28 Mar 2017
40 Advanced LIGO: The Era of Gravitational Wave Astronomy Dr Philipp Podsiadlowski, University of Oxford gives a talk about gravitational waves in light of the recent detections by the LIGO detector. Philipp Podsiadlowski 28 Mar 2017
41 Things that go bump in the night: Exploding stars and black holes Professor Rob Fender, University of Oxford talks through some observations of black holes. Rob Fender 28 Mar 2017
42 Creative Commons How do you teach a machine to a drive a car? Autonomous cars have been a staple of science fiction for years featuring in films like Minority Report and I Robot. But how far away are we really from enjoying a hassle-free driving journey? To find out the answer we visited Dr Ingmar Posner, Associate Ingmar Posner 28 Mar 2017
43 Strachey Lecture - Probabilistic machine learning: foundations and frontiers Professor Zoubin Ghahramani gives a talk on probabilistic modelling from it's foundations to current areas of research at the frontiers of machine learning. Zoubin Ghahramani 15 Mar 2017
44 Will supersonic transport ever make a comeback? The Concord is seen as an iconic aircraft and a technological breakthrough – so why can we only see them in museums? In our episode of The Big Questions podcast series we visited Dr Neil Ashton from the E-Research Centre at the University of Oxford to ask Neil Ashton 13 Mar 2017
45 The Future of Particle Physics Panel Discussion Panel discussion with Prof John Womersley (STFC), Prof John Wheater (Department of Physics), Prof Ian Shipsey (Particle Physics), Prof Dave Wark (Particle Physics), Prof Daniella Bortoletto (Physics) and Prof Subir Sarkar (Particle Theory Group) John Womersley, John Wheater, Ian Shipsey, Dave Wark 07 Mar 2017
46 The Future of Particle Physics: The Particle Physics Christmas Lecture Professor John Womersley (STFC) gives the Particle Physics Christmas Lecture. John Womersley 07 Mar 2017
47 Kilometres: Turbulence - Morning of Theroetical Physics Fasten Your Seat Belts: Turbulent Flows in Nature. Turbulence is ubiquitous in nature, and it often causes us headaches both literal and metaphorical. Michael Barnes 28 Feb 2017
48 Microns: The bacterial viewpoint - Morning of Theroetical Physics Ramin Golestanian will introduce you to Life at Low Reynolds number and ask how microorganisms can swim, navigate, and coordinate their activities. Ramin Golestanian 28 Feb 2017
49 Centimetres: Fluids all around us - Morning of Theroetical Physics Julia Yeomans will talk about fluids and flows all around us: from superhydrophobic surfaces and how animals and plants keep dry, to bouncing droplets and balloons. Julia Yeomans 28 Feb 2017
50 How do you turn an orange into a grapefruit? Favouring. It’s a global industry and here in Oxford a group of scientists are getting a ‘taste’ of the action by making natural flavours by manipulating enzymes. Alize Pennec 27 Feb 2017
51 Statistics: Why the Truth Matters Tim Harford Tim Harford, Financial Times columnist and presenter of Radio 4's "More or Less", argues that politicians, businesses and even charities have been poisoning the value of statistics and data. Tim Harford 14 Feb 2017
52 Earthquakes, can we make smarter buildings? Major earthquakes across the world have damaged or destroyed numerous buildings, bridges, and other structures. But is there a way of monitoring the building structures to see if it is at risk of falling after an earthquake has struck? Orfeas Kypris 09 Feb 2017
53 What can a power ballad can teach us about the sex life of a fruit flies? Music provides the soundtrack to our lives. The highs, the lows and the heartache. So why wouldn’t it be the same for a fruit fly? On this episode of the Oxford Sparks Big Questions podcast, we mix music with sex education of fruit flies! Stuart Wigby, Sally Le Page, Eleanor Bath 27 Jan 2017
54 How do we stop our social media obsession from making us a target for crime? How vulnerable are we to crime by the statuses we post on our social accounts? Jason Nurse 17 Jan 2017
55 Creative Commons The Mathematics of Visual Illusions Puzzling things happen in human perception when ambiguous or incomplete information is presented to the eyes. In this lecture Ian Stewart demonstrates how these phenomena provide clues about the workings of the visual system. Ian Stewart 05 Jan 2017
56 How do you make scientific equipment space proof? Since the 1960’s man has been sending missions to Mars. Some successes, some failures. This hasn’t stopped scientists trying to explore this incredible red planet. Colin Wilson 21 Dec 2016
57 What would life be like if Parasitoid Wasps didn’t exist? Our Festive episode of our Oxford Sparks podcast follows the traditional Christmas story of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’. Christopher Jeffs 14 Dec 2016
58 The Observer Strikes Back What is an observer? In the fifth and final part of their discussion, Jim Hartle and Bernard Carr discuss the nature of observers. Jim Hartle, Bernard Carr 06 Dec 2016
59 No Boundaries for Quantum Cosmology Where is the observer in the universe? In the fourth part of their discussion, Jim Hartle and Bernard Carr discuss Jim Hartle’s no-boundary proposal. Bernard Carr, Jim Hartle 06 Dec 2016
60 Physics and Philosophy What are the limits of physics? In the third part of their discussion, Bernard Carr and Jim Hartle talk about the point at which physics ends and philosophy begins. Bernard Carr, Jim Hartle 06 Dec 2016
61 The Quantum and Cosmological Scales How do we combine our theory of the very small with our theory of the largest scales of the universe? In the second part of their discussion, Jim Hartle and Bernard Carr hash out the connections between cosmology and quantum mechanics. Jim Hartle, Bernard Carr 06 Dec 2016
62 What Fine Tunings Are There? Is the universe fine-tuned for life? In the first part of their discussion, Bernard Carr and Jim Hartle discuss how physical theories might contain unexplained assumptions that are necessary for the existence of life. Bernard Carr, Jim Hartle 06 Dec 2016
63 Can bubbles help cure cancer? On this episode, can bubbles cure cancer? Eleanor Stride 02 Dec 2016
64 Astronomy at the Highest Energies: Exploring the Extreme Universe with Gamma Rays Physics Colloquium 25 November 2016 delivered by Dr Jamie Holder Jamie Holder 30 Nov 2016
65 Creative Commons Are exhausts causing dementia? Many people are exposed to exhaust emissions every day in different ways. But what are the harmful effects of these fumes when we breathe them in? Could we see difficulties in other areas of our bodies? What is it doing to our brains? Imad Ahmed 21 Nov 2016
66 Exotic combinations of quarks - A journey of fifty years Physics Colloquium 11 November 2016 delivered by Professor Jon Rosner Jon Rosner 17 Nov 2016
67 Our Simple but Strange Universe The 13th Hintze Biannual Lecture delivered by Professor David Spergel David Spergel 17 Nov 2016
68 How can we understand our complex economy? We are getting better at predicting things about our environment - the impact of climate change for example. But what about predicting our collective effect on ourselves? J Doyne Farmer 10 Nov 2016
69 Oxford University Department of Computer Science: Second Year Group Design Practicals Students undertaking undergraduate (first) degrees in Computer Science, Computer Science & Philosophy and Maths & Computer Science undertake a Group Design Practical as a compulsory part of the course. Computer Science Students 08 Nov 2016
70 Creative Commons How do you make a reliable weather forecast? Latest episode from Oxford Sparks, this episode on how to predict the weather. Hannah Christensen 04 Nov 2016
71 Strachey Lecture - The Once and Future Turing Professor Andrew Hodges author of 'Alan Turing: The Enigma' talks about Turing's work and ideas from the definition of computability, the universal machine to the prospect of Artificial Intelligence. Andrew Hodges, Mike Wooldridge 02 Nov 2016
72 Topology and the Classification of Matter: New Physics Hidden in Plain Sight Third lecture "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor Steve Simon, introduction by Professor John WheelerThird Steve Simon 01 Nov 2016
73 Magnets, superfluids and superconductors Second lecture "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor Fabian Essler, introduction by Professor John Wheeler. Fabian Essler 01 Nov 2016
74 Identical particles: from one to many First lecture in the "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor John Chalker, introduction by Professor John Wheeler. John Chalker 01 Nov 2016
75 Searching for - and finding! Gravitational Waves Physics Colloquium 27th October 2016 delivered by Professor Gabriela Gonzalez Gabriela Gonzalez 01 Nov 2016
76 Visualizing Quantum Matter Physics Colloquium 28 October 2016 delivered by Professor Séamus Davis Séamus Davis 01 Nov 2016
77 Atmospheric Circulation and Climate Change Physics Colloquium 21st October 2016 delivered by Professor Theodore (Ted) Shepherd Theodore (Ted) Shepherd 01 Nov 2016
78 Autism and Minds Wired for Science Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Cambridge, and Director of the Autism Research Centre, gives the 2016 Charles Simonyi Lecture on new research into autism. Simon Baron-Cohen, Marcus du Sautoy 31 Oct 2016
79 Creative Commons The explosion mechanism of massive stars Physics Colloquium 14th October 2016 delivered by Professor Thierry Foglizzo Thierry Foglizzo 27 Oct 2016
80 Is my bacon sandwich really going to kill me? Statistician Dr Jennifer Rogers discusses the numbers linked to processed meat and bowel cancer. Jennifer Rogers 25 Oct 2016
81 DMRG in Quantum Chemistry: From its relation to traditional methods to n-orbital density matrices and beyond In my talk I will attempt to provide an overview on the application of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm in quantum chemistry. Markus Reiher 21 Oct 2016
82 (Almost) 25 Years of DMRG - What Is It About? In this talk, I will introduce DMRG both from the historical (statistical) and modern (matrix product state) perspective, highlighting why it has become the method of choice for one-dimensional quantum systems in and out of equilibrium. Ulrich Schollwöck 21 Oct 2016
83 Openness of a Many-fermion Quantum System from the Generalized Pauli Principle Information about the interaction of a many-electron quantum system with its environment is encoded within the one-electron density matrix (1-RDM). Romit Chakraborty 21 Oct 2016
84 Generalized Pauli Constraints in Reduced Density Matrix Functional Theory Reduced Density Matrix Functional Theory is a method that relies on the 1-1 correspondence between the ground state wavefunction of many electron systems and the first order reduced density matrix(1RDM) and uses the second one as its fundamental valuable. Iris Theophilou 21 Oct 2016
85 Quasipinning and Extended Hartree-Fock Method based on Generalized Pauli Constraints It is now known that fermionic natural occupation numbers (NON) do not only obey Pauli’s exclusion principle but are even stronger restricted by the so-called generalized Pauli constraints (GPC). Carlos Benavides-Riveros 21 Oct 2016
86 Fermionic Exchange Symmetry: Quantifying its Influence beyond Pauli’s Exclusion Principle The Pauli exclusion principle has a strong impact on the properties and the behavior of most fermionic quantum systems. Remarkably, even stronger restrictions on fermionic natural occupation numbers follow from the fermionic exchange symmetry. Felix Tennie 21 Oct 2016
87 Pinning of Fermionic Occupation Numbers The Pauli exclusion principle is a constraint on the natural occupation numbers of fermionic states. Matthias Christandl 21 Oct 2016
88 Calculation Of Generalized Pauli Constraints In the talk I am planning to explain two different solutions of N-representability problem and then give the algorithm to calculate GPCs. Murat Altunbulak 21 Oct 2016
89 Quantum Marginal Problem and Generalized Pauli Constraints I will give an introduction to the univariate quantum marginal problem using an elementary mathematical point of view. In particular, I will explain how extremality of the local spectrum carries structural information about the global wave function. David Gross 21 Oct 2016
90 Derivation of the time-dependent Hartree(-Fock)-equation In the talk I will present recent progress in proving closeness of the microscopic and effective description for systems of many fermions. Peter Pickl 21 Oct 2016
91 Physical Meaning of Natural Orbitals and Natural Occupation Numbers We show that the success of reduced density-matrix functional theory in describing molecular dissociation lies in the flexibility provided by fractional occupation numbers while the role of the natural orbitals is minor. Nicole Helbig 21 Oct 2016
92 Introduction and Overview of the Reduced Density Matrix Functional Theory In this presentation, we review the theoretical foundations of RDMFT the most successful approximations and extensions, we assess present-day functionals on applications to molecular and periodic systems and we discuss the challenges and future prospect Nektarios N. Lathiotakis 21 Oct 2016
93 As he retires from the the Savilian Chair of Geometry, Oxford Mathematician Nigel Hitchin reflects From early mathematical inspiration at school in Duffield, Derbyshire, Nigel recalls his often unplanned progress via Jesus College, Oxford, Princeton, Cambridge and Warwick, before his final return to Oxford. Nigel Hitching, Martin Bridson 19 Oct 2016
94 Fashion, Faith, and Fantasy in the New Physics of the Universe What can fashionable ideas, blind faith, or pure fantasy have to do with the scientific quest to understand the universe? Surely, scientists are immune to trends, dogmatic beliefs, or flights of fancy? Roger Penrose 19 Oct 2016
95 Creative Commons PDEs (5.8) In this concluding lecture, Professor Nick Trefethen discusses the question Who invented the great numerical algorithms? Nick Trefethen 17 Oct 2016
96 Creative Commons PDEs (5.7) In this lecture, Professor Trefethen discusses Chebyshev spectral discretization. Nick Trefethen 17 Oct 2016
97 Creative Commons PDEs (5.6) In this lecture, Professor Trefethen discusses Fourier, Laurent, and Chebyshev. Then, Chebyshev series and interpolants Nick Trefethen 17 Oct 2016
98 Creative Commons PDEs (5.5) In this lecture, Professor Trefethen discusses Fourier spectral discretization and Fourier spectral discretization via FFT. Nick Trefethen 17 Oct 2016
99 Creative Commons PDEs (5.4) In this lecture, Professor Trefethen discusses finite differencing in general grids and multiple space dimensions. Nick Trefethen 17 Oct 2016
100 Creative Commons PDEs (5.3) In this lecture, Professor Trefethen discusses order of accuracy and reaction-diffusion equations and other stiff PDEs. Nick Trefethen 17 Oct 2016