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Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS)

The Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS) Division is one of the four academic divisions of the University of Oxford. We have over 6,000 students and research staff, and generate over half of our funding from external research grants.
The MPLS Division's 10 departments and 3 interdisciplinary units span the full spectrum of the mathematical, computational, physical, engineering and life sciences, and undertake both fundamental research and cutting-edge applied work. Our research addresses major societal and technological challenges and is increasingly interdisciplinary in nature. We collaborate closely with colleagues in Oxford across the medical sciences, social sciences and humanities.
Today's scientific research not only crosses traditional subject boundaries, but also transcends national boundaries: MPLS scientists collaborate with researchers from around the world, and play leading roles in many international projects.

Series associated with Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS)

A Mathematician's Holiday
Ada Lovelace Symposium - Celebrating 200 Years of a Computer Visionary
Astrophysics: An Introduction
Big Questions - with Oxford Sparks
Building a Business: Moving Your Product to the Market
Caging Schrödinger's Cat - Quantum Nanotechnology
Careers in Chemistry: Academia
Careers in Chemistry: Beyond Academia
Chemistry for the Future: Clean Energy
Chemistry for the Future: Human Health
Chemistry for the Future: Incredible Machines
Chemistry for the Future: Meet the Scientists
Chemistry for the Future: Solar Fuels
Chemistry for the Future: Strange Substances and Structures
Chemistry Spotlight Lectures
Christmas Science Lectures
Computer Science
Cultural Heritage Forum
Darwin 200
Department of Engineering Science Centenary Lectures
Department of Engineering Science Lectures
Department of Materials
Department of Physics
Department of Statistics
Earth Sciences
Exploring Spoken Word Data in Oral History Archives
Inside Oxford Science
International Conference on Functional Programming 2017
Lab, Camera, Action!
Mathematical Institute
Open Science
Oxford Physics Alumni
Oxford Physics Public Lectures
Oxford Sparks: bringing science to life
Particle Physics (Alan Barr)
Physics and Philosophy: Arguments, Experiments and a Few Things in Between
Physics Flash Talks
Quantum Mechanics
Reduced Density Matrices in Quantum Physics and Role of Fermionic Exchange Symmetry
Scientific Computing for DPhil Students
So you want to study Chemistry?
Stargazing
Strachey 100: an Oxford Computing Pioneer
Study Skills
Sutton Trust Chemistry Summer School
The Hinshelwood Lectures: Bioinspired Materials
The Medtronic Lectures in Biomedical Engineering
The Oxford Solid State Basics
The Physics of Fine-Tuning
The Secrets of Mathematics
The World of Art
Theoretical Physics - From Outer Space to Plasma
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Creative Commons Inferring Scope through Syntactic Sugar Justin Pombrio, Brown University, USA, gives the third talk in the fifth panel, Inference and Analysis on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by Shriram Krishnamurthi, Brown University, USA, Mitchell Wand, Northeastern University, USA. Justin Pombrio 14 Sep 2017
2 Creative Commons Automating Sized-Type Inference for Complexity Analysis Martin Avanzini, University of Innsbruck, Austria, gives the second talk in the fifth panel, Inference and Analysis on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by Ugo Dal Lago Ugo Dal Lago University of Bologna, Italy / Inria, France Italy. Martin Avanzini 14 Sep 2017
3 Creative Commons Constrained Type Families Richard A. Eisenberg, Bryn Mawr College, USA, gives the first talk in the fifth panel, Inference and Analysis, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by J. Garrett Morris, University of Kansas, USA, Richard A Eisenberg 14 Sep 2017
4 Creative Commons Gradual Typing with Union and Intersection Types Victor Lanvin ENS Cachan, France, gives the third talk in the fourth panel, Integrating Static and Dynamic Typing, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by Co-written by Giuseppe Castagna, CNRS/University of Paris Diderot, Victor Lanvin 14 Sep 2017
5 Creative Commons On Polymorphic Gradual Typing Yuu Igarashi, Kyoto University, Japan, gives the second talk in the fourth panel, Integrating Static and Dynamic Typing, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by Taro Sekiyama, IBM Research, Japan, Atsushi Igarashi, Kyoto University, Japan. Yuu Igarashi 14 Sep 2017
6 Creative Commons Theorems for Free for Free: Parametricity, With and Without Types Amal Ahmed, Northeastern University, USA, gives the first talk in the fourth panel, Integrating Static and Dynamic Typing, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Amal Ahmed 14 Sep 2017
7 Creative Commons Gradual Session Types Peter Thiemann, University of Freiburg, Germany, gives the fourth talk in the third panel, Contracts and Sessions, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Peter Thiemann 14 Sep 2017
8 Creative Commons Manifest Sharing with Session Types Stephanie Balzer, Carnegie Mellon University, USA gives the third talk in the third panel, Contracts and Sessions, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference.. Co-written Frank Pfenning Carnegie Mellon University, USA. Stephanie Balzer 14 Sep 2017
9 Creative Commons Whip: Higher-Order Contracts for Modern Services Lucas Waye, Harvard University, USA, gives the second talk in the third panel, Contracts and Sessions , on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by Christos Dimoulas, Harvard University, USA, Stephen Chong, Harvard University, USA. Lucas Waye 14 Sep 2017
10 Creative Commons Chaperone Contracts for Higher-Order Sessions Hernan Melgratti, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, gives the first talk in the third panel, Contracts and Sessions, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by Luca Padovani Luca Padovani, University of Turin, Italy. Hernan Melgratti 14 Sep 2017
11 Creative Commons A Metaprogramming Framework for Formal Verification Sebastian Ullrich, KIT, Germany, gives the fourth talk in the second panel, Dependently Typed Programming, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Sebastian Ullrich 14 Sep 2017
12 Creative Commons Normalization by Evaluation for Sized Dependent Types Andreas Abel, University of Gothenburg, Sweden, gives the first talk in the second panel, Dependently Typed Programming , on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Andreas Abel 14 Sep 2017
13 Creative Commons A Specification for Dependent Types in Haskell Antoine Vizard, University of Pennsylvania, USA, gives the first talk in the second panel, Dependently Typed Programming , on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Antoine Vizard 14 Sep 2017
14 Creative Commons Herbarium Racketensis: A Stroll through the Woods (Functional Pearl) Robby Findler, Northwestern University, USA, gives the first talk in the first panel, Domain-Specific Languages, on the 3rd day of the ICPF conference. Robby Findler 14 Sep 2017
15 Creative Commons Visitors Unchained François Pottier, Inria, France, gives the second talk in the fourth panel, Program Construction, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. François Pottier 14 Sep 2017
16 Creative Commons Compiling to Categories Conan Elliott, Target, USA, gives the first talk in the fourth panel, Program Construction, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Conan Elliott 14 Sep 2017
17 Creative Commons Local Refinement Typing Benjamin Cosman, University of California at San Diego, USA, gives the third talk in the second panel, Tools for Verification, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Co-written by Ranjit Jhala, University of California at San Diego, USA. Benjamin Cosman 14 Sep 2017
18 Creative Commons SpaceSearch: A Library for Building and Verifying Solver-Aided Tools Konstantin Weitz, University of Washington, USA, gives the second talk in the second panel, Tools for Verification, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Konstantin Weitz 14 Sep 2017
19 Creative Commons Kami: A Platform for High-Level Parametric Hardware Specification and Its Modular Verification Muralidaran Vijayaraghavan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, gives the first talk in the fourth panel, Foundations of Higher-Order Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Muralidaran Vijayaraghavan 14 Sep 2017
20 Creative Commons No-Brainer CPS Conversion Milo Davis, Northeastern University, USA gives the fourth talk in the second panel, Foundations of Higher-Order Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF. Co-written by William Meehan, Northeastern University, USA, Olin Shivers, Northeastern University, USA Milo Davis 14 Sep 2017
21 Creative Commons Foundations of Strong Call by Need Thibaut Balabonski, LRI, France / University of Paris-Sud, France gives the third talk in the second panel, Foundations of Higher-Order Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Thibaut Balabonski 14 Sep 2017
22 Creative Commons A Relational Logic for Higher-Order Programs Alejandro Aguirre, IMDEA Software Institute, Spain, gives the second talk in the second panel, Foundations of Higher-Order Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Alejandro Aguirre 14 Sep 2017
23 Creative Commons How to Prove Your Calculus Is Decidable: Practical Applications of Second-Order Algebraic Theories and Computation Makoto Hamana, Gunma University, Japan, gives the first talk in the second panel, Foundations of Higher-Order Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Makoto Hamana 14 Sep 2017
24 Creative Commons Better Living through Operational Semantics: An Optimizing Compiler for Radio Protocols Geoffrey Mainland, Drexel University, USA, gives the fourth talk in the first panel, Low-level and Systems Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Geoffrey Mainland 14 Sep 2017
25 Creative Commons Verifying Efficient Function Calls in CakeML Scott Owens University of Kent, UK, gives the third talk in the first panel, Low-level and Systems Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Scott Owens 14 Sep 2017
26 Creative Commons Verified Low-Level Programming Embedded in F* Jonathan Protzen, Microsoft Research, n.n, United States, gives the second talk in the first panel, Low-level and Systems Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Jonathan Protzen 14 Sep 2017
27 Creative Commons Persistence for the Masses: RRB-Vectors in a Systems Language Juan Pedro Bolívar Puente, Independent Consultant, Sinusoidal Engineering, Germany, gives the first talk in the first panel, Low-level and Systems Programming, on the 2nd day of the ICPF conference. Juan Pedro Bolívar Puente 14 Sep 2017
28 Creative Commons Assuring AI John Launchbury, Chief Scientist of Galois Inc, gives the second keynote of the ICPF conference. John Launchbury 14 Sep 2017
29 Creative Commons Effect-Driven QuickChecking of Compilers Jan Midtgaard, gives the fourth presentation in the fourth panel, Effects, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Mathias Nygaard Justesen, Patrick Kasting, Flemming Nielson, Hanne Riis Nielson, DTU, Denmark. Jan Midtgaard 13 Sep 2017
30 Creative Commons Imperative Functional Programs That Explain Their Work Jan Stolarek, University of Edinburgh, UK, gives the third presentation in the fourth panel, Effects, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Wilmer Ricciotti, Roly Perera and James Cheney, and University of Edinburgh, UK. Jan Stolarek 13 Sep 2017
31 Creative Commons On the Expressive Power of User-Defined Effects: Effect Handlers, Monadic Reflection, Delimited Control Ohad Kammar, University of Oxford, UK, gives the second presentation in the fourth panel, Effects, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Yannick Forster, Saarland University, Germany/University of Cambridge, UK, Sam Lindley, University of Edinburgh. Ohad Kammar 13 Sep 2017
32 Creative Commons Abstracting Definitional Interpreters David Darais, University of Maryland, USA, gives the first presentation in the fourth panel, Effects, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Nicholas Labich, David Van Horn, Phúc C. Nguyễn, University of Maryland, USA. David Darais 13 Sep 2017
33 Creative Commons Symbolic Conditioning of Arrays in Probabilistic Programs Praveen Narayanan, Indiana University, USA, gives the third presentation in the third panel, Applications, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Chung-Chief Shan, Indiana University, USA. Praveen Narayanan 13 Sep 2017
34 Creative Commons A Framework for Adaptive Differential Privacy Daniel Winograd-Cort University of Pennsylvania, USA, gives the first presentation in the third panel, Applications, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Andreas Haeberlen and Aaron Roth, University of Pennsylvania, USA. Daniel Winograd-Cort 13 Sep 2017
35 Creative Commons Prototyping a Query Compiler using Coq (Experience Report) Louis Mandel, IBM, gives the first presentation in the third panel, Applications, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Joshua Auerbach, Martin Hirzel, Avraham Shinnar, Jerome Simeon, IBM Research, USA. Louis Mandel 13 Sep 2017
36 Creative Commons A Unified Approach to Solving Seven Programming Problems (Functional Pearl) William E. Byrd, University of Utah, USA, gives the fourth presentation in the second panel, Functional Programming Techniques, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Gregory Rosenblatt, n.n, Matthew Might, Michael Ballantyne, University of Utah. William E Byrd 13 Sep 2017
37 Creative Commons Generic Functional Parallel Algorithms: Scan and FFT Conan Elliott, Target, USA United States, gives the third presentation in the second panel, Functional Programming Techniques, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Conan Elliott 13 Sep 2017
38 Creative Commons A Pretty But Not Greedy Printer (Functional Pearl) Jean-Philippe Bernardy, University of Gothenburg, gives the second presentation in the second panel, Functional Programming Techniques, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Jean-Philippe Bernardy 13 Sep 2017
39 Creative Commons Faster Coroutine Pipelines Mike Spivey, University of Oxford, UK, gives the first presentation in the second panel, Functional Programming Techniques, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Mike Spivey 13 Sep 2017
40 Creative Commons Scaling up Functional Programming Education: Under the Hood of the OCaml MOOC Roberto Di Cosmo, Inria, France / University of Paris Diderot, France, gives the fourth presentation in the first panel, Art and Education, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Benjamin Canou, OCamlPro, n.n and Grégoire Henry OCamlPro, n.n. Roberto Di Cosmo 13 Sep 2017
41 Creative Commons Lock-Step Simulation Is Child's Play (Experience Report) Joachim Breiner, University of Pennsylvania, United States, gives the third presentation in the first panel, Art and Education, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Chris Smith Google, USA. Joachim Breiner 13 Sep 2017
42 Creative Commons Testing and Debugging Functional Reactive Programming Ivan Perez, University of Nottingham, UK, gives the second presentation in the first panel, Art and Education, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Henrik Nilsson, University of Nottingham, UK. Ivan Perez 13 Sep 2017
43 Creative Commons Super 8 Languages for Making Movies (Functional Pearl) Leif Andersen, Northeastern University, USA, gives the first presentation in the first panel, Art and Education, in the ICPF 2017 conference. Co-written by Stephen Chang, Northeastern University, USA and Matthias Felleisen Northeastern University, USA. Leif Andersen 13 Sep 2017
44 Creative Commons Compositional creativity: some principles for talking to computers Chris Martens gives the first Speaker North Carolina State University United States Chris Martens 13 Sep 2017
45 How fast is Greenland moving? Greenland has some many fascinating facts like it’s the world's largest island, it belongs to Denmark, it actually isn’t that green but mostly covered in ice. But did you know that Greenland is actually on the move? Ian Hewitt 31 Aug 2017
46 Lovelace Lecture: Learning and Efficiency of Outcomes in Games Éva Tardos, Department of Computer Science, Cornell University, gives the 2017 Ada Lovelace Lecture on 6th June 2017. Éva Tardos, Leslie Goldberg 22 Aug 2017
47 The Law of the Few The study of networks offers a fruitful approach to understanding human behaviour. Sanjeev Goyal is one of its pioneers. In this lecture Sanjeev presents a puzzle: Sanjeev Goyal 04 Jul 2017
48 Observation of the mergers of binary black holes: The opening of gravitational wave astronomy The 2017 Halley Lecture 7th June 2017 delivered by Professor Rainer Weiss, MIT on behalf of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration Rainer Weiss 27 Jun 2017
49 Ghost Imaging with Quantum Light Physics Colloquium 26th May 2017 delivered by Professor Miles Padgett, University of Glasgow Miles Padgett 27 Jun 2017
50 Pulsars & Extreme Physics - A 50th Anniversary Physics Colloquium 5th May 2017 delivered by Dame Professor Jocelyn Bell Burnell Jocelyn Bell Burnell 27 Jun 2017
51 Starquakes Expose Stellar Heartbeats The 14th Hintze Biannual Lecture 4th May 2017 delivered by Professor Conny Aerts - Director, Institute of Astronomy KU Leuven Connie Aerts 27 Jun 2017
52 What are types for? Types in programming languages are commonly thought of as a way of preventing certain bad things from happening, such as multiplying a number by a string. Jeremy Gibbons 26 Jun 2017
53 Parametric Polymorphism and models of storage In this presentation, Uday brings together two strands of Christopher Strachey’s thought: parametric polymorphism and abstract models of storage. Uday Reddy 26 Jun 2017
54 Probabilistic Programming Hongseok begins by talking about a program of Strachey’s that wrote “love letters” using the Manchester University computer. He then uses this as a lead in for discussing probabilistic methods of generating algorithms and programs. Hongseok Yang 26 Jun 2017
55 Christopher Strachey, First-Class Citizen Philip reviews Christopher Strachey’s influence on modern-day functional programming languages. Philip Wadler 26 Jun 2017
56 A modelling language approach to defining mathematical structures via semantics In this talk, Jane presents about her work on modelling dynamic behaviour of systems using quantative modelling techniques. Particular kinds of modelling diagrams are used and a mathematical approach to looking at their meaning is presented. Jane Hillston 26 Jun 2017
57 Greetings to the participants at “Strachey 100” The logician Dana Scott played a crucial part in the story of denotational semantics, working for a term with Christopher Strachey in Autumn 1969, when he created a mathematical model for the foundation of the method. Dana Scott 26 Jun 2017
58 Strachey: school master, language designer, colleague In this panel discussion, three people who knew Christopher Strachey in different contexts talk about their memories of him. Roger Penrose, Michael Jackson, David Hartley 26 Jun 2017
59 Semantic relationships: reducing the separation between practice and theory Christopher Strachey believed that the gap between theory and practice was impeding the development of computing science. Robert Milne 26 Jun 2017
60 SIS, a semantics implementation system During Peter’s DPhil studies, supervised by Christopher Strachey, he developed a prototype of a system for executing programs based on their denotational semantics. Peter Mosses 26 Jun 2017
61 Strachey and the development of CPL Chrisopher Strachey was the most significant contributor to the design and implementation of the programming language CPL. Martin Richards 26 Jun 2017
62 Strachey and the Oxford Programming Research Group Christopher Strachey’s right-hand man at Oxford talks about Strachey’s time as the head of the Programming Research Group (PRG). Joe Stoy 26 Jun 2017
63 Strachey: the Bloomsbury Years A historian’s perspective on the earlier years of Christopher Strachey’s life. The talk covers his familial connections, his early career as a school master, and his first computing projects. Martin Campbell-Kelly 26 Jun 2017
64 Strachey Lecture- Computer Agents that Interact Proficiently with People Professor Kraus will show how combining machine learning techniques for human modelling, human behavioural models, formal decision-making and game theory approaches enables agents to interact well with people. Sarit Kraus 23 Jun 2017
65 Should I take a selfie with a wild animal? Travel companies around the world profit from some of the cruellest types of wildlife tourist attractions on earth. Tom Moorhouse 02 Jun 2017
66 What does Hollywood get right and wrong when science is in the storyline? What does hollywood get right? Neil Ashton, Colin Wilson, Eleanor Stride, Jason Nurse 02 Jun 2017
67 How open should open data be? Open data impacts everybody. Through it we can access healthcare services, understand our governments better and, of course, travel to places more easily. But, how open should open data be? Sir Nigel Shadbolt 02 Jun 2017
68 The Sound of Symmetry Symmetry has played a role both for composers and in the creation of musical instruments. Marcus shows how composers have used this symmetry and demonstrates how Ernst Chladni revealed extraordinary symmetrical shapes in the vibrations of a metal Plate. Marcus du Sautoy 24 May 2017
69 Creative Commons Will future communications technologies lead to cyber wars or a better world? Communications technology has enabled massive social change over the past decades. However, the many benefits that we enjoy are accompanied by challenges - cyber security, inadequate coverage, the ease of spreading fake news, Naomi Climer 22 May 2017
70 Creative Commons Wireless Communications Using Light In this lecture, Dominic O'Brien introduces the field, the challenges, and the promise for the future of this area of research. Dominic O'Brien 22 May 2017
71 Creative Commons Network Complexity and the Internet of Things In this talk, Justin Coon explores the issue of complexity in the IoT from a fundamental perspective and provide some insight into what this means for practical deployments in the future. Justin Coon 22 May 2017
72 Lecture 6: Bioinspired Colloidal Assembly: From Photonics to Encryption The sixth lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series. Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
73 Lecture 5: Everything SLIPS: A New Concept in Anti-biofouling Materials The fifth lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
74 Lecture 4: Hydrophobicity, Superhydrophobicity, Omniphobicity and Slippery Surfaces The fourth lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
75 Lecture 3: Actuated "spiny" Surfaces a la Echinoderms: En Route for Adaptive Materials The third lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series. Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
76 Lecture 2: Rationally Designed Complex 3D Microarchitectures The second lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
77 Lecture 1: Bio-inspired approaches to crystal design The first lecture in the Hinshelwood lecture series. Joanna Aizenberg 18 May 2017
78 The Butterfly Effect - What Does it Really Signify? Tim Palmer discusses Ed Lorenz the man and his work, and compares and contrasts the meaning of the “Butterfly Effect" as most people understand it today, and as Lorenz himself intended it to mean. Tim Palmer 18 May 2017
79 Exploring the very early universe with gravitational waves John March-Russell gives a talk about gravitational wave signals of stringy physics, a ‘soundscape’ connected to the landscape of string vacua. John March-Russell 10 May 2017
80 The birth of gravitational wave astronomy Subir Sarkar reviews the detection of the ‘chirrup’ signal from a pair of merging massive black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory, as well as subsequent experimental developments. Subir Sarkar 10 May 2017
81 From action at a distance to gravitational waves James Binney gives a talk about the mathematics that describe Gravitational waves. James Binney 10 May 2017
82 What happened to the first soviet scientist to solve a fundamental problem in mathematics? New episode for the Oxford Sparks Big questions series. Christopher Hollings 08 May 2017
83 How open should open data be? Open data impacts everybody. Through it we can access healthcare services, understand our governments better and, of course, travel to places more easily. But, how open should open data be? Sir Nigel Shadbolt 04 May 2017
84 Curiosity’s Search for Ancient Habitable Environments at Gale Crater, Mars 4th Annual Lobanov-Rostovsky Lecture in Planetary Geology delivered by Professor John Grotzinger, Caltech, USA John Grotzinger 27 Apr 2017
85 The Origins and Evolution of Exoplanet Atmospheres and Oceans 3rd Annual Lobanov-Rostovsky Lecture in Planetary Geology delivered by Professor Raymond T Pierrehumbert. Raymond T Pierrehumbert 27 Apr 2017
86 Curiosity’s Search for Ancient Habitable Environments at Gale Crater, Mars 4th Annual Lobanov-Rostovsky Lecture in Planetary Geology delivered by Professor John Grotzinger, Caltech, USA John Grotzinger 27 Apr 2017
87 Spatio-temporal Optical Vortices Physics Colloquium 10th March 2017 delivered by Professor Howard Milchberg, University of Maryland, USA Howard Milchberg 27 Apr 2017
88 Learning new physics from a medieval thinker: Big Bangs and Rainbows Physics Colloquium 24 February 2017 delivered by Professor Tom McLeish FRS, Department of Physics and Institute for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Durham University, UK Tom McLeish 27 Apr 2017
89 The applied side of Bell nonlocality Physics Colloquium 17 February 2016 delivered by Professor Valerio Scarani Valerio Scarani 27 Apr 2017
90 What does Hollywood get right and wrong when science is in the storyline? What does hollywood get right? Neil Ashton, Colin Wilson, Eleanor Stride, Jason Nurse 19 Apr 2017
91 Should I take a selfie with a wild animal? Travel companies around the world profit from some of the cruellest types of wildlife tourist attractions on earth. Tom Moorhouse 11 Apr 2017
92 The Beauty of Flavour - Latest results from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider Physics Colloquium 3 February 2017 delivered by Professor Val Gibson, Cambridge Val Gibson 05 Apr 2017
93 From Materials to Cosmology: Studying the early universe under the microscope Physics Colloquium 27 January 2017 delivered by Professor Nicola Spaldin, ETH Zurich Nicola Spaldin 05 Apr 2017
94 The New Era in Observational Cosmology In the fourth part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin conjecture about the future of inflation. They talk about the potential for new evidence for and against the theory, and the variety of new probes into our cosmological environment. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
95 When is a theory good enough? In the third part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin talk about whether one should look for a deeper physical theory when one’s current theory is well-supported by observation. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
96 Can we measure naturalness? In the second part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin consider ways to build the naturalness of an inflationary model into our expectations for observing it. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
97 An Encyclopedia of Inflation In the first part of their discussion, Pedro Ferreira and Jerome Martin talk about the variety of inflationary models. They discuss methods for distinguishing between them based on evidence and describe the application of Bayesian statistics to inflation. Pedro Ferreira, Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
98 Inflation in the Future What should we expect to learn in the future? In the fourth part of their chat, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger talk about how we expect inflationary theory to develop, and how observations may lead to new physics in this area. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
99 Strings, Inflation, and Alternatives In the third part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger explain the relationship between string theory and inflationary models. Can inflation arise from particle physics, or do we need to look for alternative models? David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
100 Inflation Predicts In the second part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger tell us what inflation predicts and whether inflation itself seems fine-tuned. This discussion was conducted at the University of Oxford on March 14, 2017. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017