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hydrogen

# Episode Title Description People Date
1 'Learning' part 3 - Learning from Nature How can Chemistry take inspiration from nature to create cleaner and more efficient ways of producing and using Hydrogen as a source of clean energy? Kylie Vincent 24 May 2016
2 Creative Commons Unlocking the Power of Hydrogen Kylie Vincent and Philip Ash discuss how bacteria harness the energy stored within hydrogen molecules, and how this could help build a more sustainable energy future. Kylie Vincent, Philip Ash 10 Jun 2015
3 Enzymes as Fuel Producers Growing energy demand worldwide is a crucial challenge for chemists. Suzannah Hexter, Armstrong Group, shows how, with the help of enzymes, the principles of photosynthesis may be artificially exploited and improved to provide a clean energy resource. Suzannah Hexter 19 Jul 2013
4 Introduction to Solar Fuels In an 'Oxford tutorial' style podcast, Professor Fraser Armstrong introduces the concept of artificial photosynthesis: coupling a light harvesting material with a fuel producer in order to generate storable energy from sunlight. Fraser Armstrong 19 Jul 2013
5 Creative Commons The Chemistry Show Join Dr Malcolm Stewart and Dr Fabrice Birembaut to find out just how much fun chemistry can be. Young, or not so young, you'll be entertained and educated by the sort of chemistry you never get to see at school: baffling, tantalising and LOUD! Malcolm Stewart, Fabrice Birembaut 03 Feb 2012
6 Creative Commons The Accelerate! Show Get up close and personal with the exciting world of particle and accelerator physics. Learn how particle accelerators can do everything from recreating conditions just after the Big Bang to finding new ways to treat cancer. Andrew Steele, Suzie Sheehy 03 Feb 2012