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# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Nuclear Fusion Aled Walker, Justin Ball, Valerian Chen, Jason Parisi discuss nuclear fusion as part of the In Our Spare Time series. Aled Walker, Justin Ball, Valerian Chen, Jason Parisi 13 Jun 2017
2 What does Hollywood get right and wrong when science is in the storyline? What does hollywood get right? Neil Ashton, Colin Wilson, Eleanor Stride, Jason Nurse 02 Jun 2017
3 How open should open data be? Open data impacts everybody. Through it we can access healthcare services, understand our governments better and, of course, travel to places more easily. But, how open should open data be? Sir Nigel Shadbolt 02 Jun 2017
4 Professor Richard Hobbs Dr. Kamal R. Mahtani, Deputy Director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, in conversation with Professor Richard Hobbs, Head of Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford. Richard Hobbs, Kamal R Mahtani 18 May 2017
5 Professor John Brodersen Professor Carl Heneghan, Director of the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, in conversation with Professor John Brodersen, General Practitioner and associate research professor in the area of medical screening at University of Copenhagen. John Brodersen, Carl Heneghan 15 May 2017
6 Creative Commons Photo Archives VI: Photography as Protocol Kelley Wilder (De Montfort University) discusses photography as a scientific protocol Kelley Wilder 09 May 2017
7 Photo Archives VI: The Laboratory as Photo Archive Chitra Ramalingam (Yale University) discusses photographic collections within science laboratories Chitra Ramalingam 09 May 2017
8 The Remedy: Introduction In this short podcast, Naomi Richman introduces the series, 'The Remedy' by offering some history and context to contemporary discussions about health and healing. Naomi Richman 08 May 2017
9 What happened to the first soviet scientist to solve a fundamental problem in mathematics? New episode for the Oxford Sparks Big questions series. Christopher Hollings 08 May 2017
10 How open should open data be? Open data impacts everybody. Through it we can access healthcare services, understand our governments better and, of course, travel to places more easily. But, how open should open data be? Sir Nigel Shadbolt 04 May 2017
11 What does Hollywood get right and wrong when science is in the storyline? What does hollywood get right? Neil Ashton, Colin Wilson, Eleanor Stride, Jason Nurse 19 Apr 2017
12 Inflation in the Future What should we expect to learn in the future? In the fourth part of their chat, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger talk about how we expect inflationary theory to develop, and how observations may lead to new physics in this area. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
13 Strings, Inflation, and Alternatives In the third part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger explain the relationship between string theory and inflationary models. Can inflation arise from particle physics, or do we need to look for alternative models? David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
14 Inflation Predicts In the second part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger tell us what inflation predicts and whether inflation itself seems fine-tuned. This discussion was conducted at the University of Oxford on March 14, 2017. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
15 Evidence For Inflation In the first part of their discussion, Dave Sloan and Robert Brandenberger go over our evidence for inflationary theories and discuss how inflationary models improve on the hot big bang. David Sloan, Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
16 Panel on Inflation Professor Joe Silk talks with Professor Robert Brandenberger, Professor Jerome Martin, and Dr. Dave Sloan about the current state of research and controversies surrounding inflation. Joe Silk, Robert Brandenberger, Jerome Martin, David Sloan 04 Apr 2017
17 Does Inflationary Cosmology Solve Fine-Tuning Problems? Professor Robert Brandenberger (McGill) argues that inflationary models still face considerable challenges. Robert Brandenberger 04 Apr 2017
18 Inflationary Attractors Dr David Sloan (Oxford) discusses the for inflation to occur given typical initial conditions. He argues that, on the right understanding of the background dynamics of the universe, inflationary conditions dominate. David Sloan 04 Apr 2017
19 Inflation After Planck Professor Jerome Martin (Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris) explains the current state of evidence for inflationary models. Jerome Martin 04 Apr 2017
20 Will supersonic transport ever make a comeback? The Concord is seen as an iconic aircraft and a technological breakthrough – so why can we only see them in museums? In our episode of The Big Questions podcast series we visited Dr Neil Ashton from the E-Research Centre at the University of Oxford to ask Neil Ashton 13 Mar 2017
21 Creative Commons How Quantum Theory Can Help Understanding Natural Language In the Quantum Group, we contribute to the field of natural language processing by using methods from mathematics and quantum theory to show how information flows between words in a sentence to give us the meaning of the sentence as a whole. Maaike Zwart 07 Mar 2017
22 The Future of Particle Physics Panel Discussion Panel discussion with Prof John Womersley (STFC), Prof John Wheater (Department of Physics), Prof Ian Shipsey (Particle Physics), Prof Dave Wark (Particle Physics), Prof Daniella Bortoletto (Physics) and Prof Subir Sarkar (Particle Theory Group) John Womersley, John Wheater, Ian Shipsey, Dave Wark 07 Mar 2017
23 What would life be like if Parasitoid Wasps didn’t exist? Our Festive episode of our Oxford Sparks podcast follows the traditional Christmas story of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’. Christopher Jeffs 14 Dec 2016
24 The Observer Strikes Back What is an observer? In the fifth and final part of their discussion, Jim Hartle and Bernard Carr discuss the nature of observers. Jim Hartle, Bernard Carr 06 Dec 2016
25 No Boundaries for Quantum Cosmology Where is the observer in the universe? In the fourth part of their discussion, Jim Hartle and Bernard Carr discuss Jim Hartle’s no-boundary proposal. Bernard Carr, Jim Hartle 06 Dec 2016
26 Physics and Philosophy What are the limits of physics? In the third part of their discussion, Bernard Carr and Jim Hartle talk about the point at which physics ends and philosophy begins. Bernard Carr, Jim Hartle 06 Dec 2016
27 The Quantum and Cosmological Scales How do we combine our theory of the very small with our theory of the largest scales of the universe? In the second part of their discussion, Jim Hartle and Bernard Carr hash out the connections between cosmology and quantum mechanics. Jim Hartle, Bernard Carr 06 Dec 2016
28 What Fine Tunings Are There? Is the universe fine-tuned for life? In the first part of their discussion, Bernard Carr and Jim Hartle discuss how physical theories might contain unexplained assumptions that are necessary for the existence of life. Bernard Carr, Jim Hartle 06 Dec 2016
29 Can bubbles help cure cancer? On this episode, can bubbles cure cancer? Eleanor Stride 02 Dec 2016
30 Mathematics: Navigating Nature's Dark Labyrinth The Inaugural Lecture of the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science, 2009. Marcus du Sautoy 18 Nov 2016
31 Autism and Minds Wired for Science Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Cambridge, and Director of the Autism Research Centre, gives the 2016 Charles Simonyi Lecture on new research into autism. Simon Baron-Cohen, Marcus du Sautoy 18 Nov 2016
32 The Remedy: Humanism In this episode, Naomi Richman interviews David Flint, Vice-Chair of the North London Humanists to find out what Humanism can offer the sick. We discuss the role of modern medicine and the possibilities of living forever. Naomi Richman, David Flint 16 Nov 2016
33 Creative Commons How do you make a reliable weather forecast? Latest episode from Oxford Sparks, this episode on how to predict the weather. Hannah Christensen 04 Nov 2016
34 Topology and the Classification of Matter: New Physics Hidden in Plain Sight Third lecture "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor Steve Simon, introduction by Professor John WheelerThird Steve Simon 01 Nov 2016
35 Magnets, superfluids and superconductors Second lecture "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor Fabian Essler, introduction by Professor John Wheeler. Fabian Essler 01 Nov 2016
36 Identical particles: from one to many First lecture in the "More is different" - how states of matter emerge from quantum theory Saturday morning of Theoretical Physics. With Professor John Chalker, introduction by Professor John Wheeler. John Chalker 01 Nov 2016
37 Autism and Minds Wired for Science Simon Baron-Cohen, Professor of Developmental Psychopathology, Cambridge, and Director of the Autism Research Centre, gives the 2016 Charles Simonyi Lecture on new research into autism. Simon Baron-Cohen, Marcus du Sautoy 31 Oct 2016
38 Dark Matter, Fine-Tuned What surprising features of our theories cry out for explanation? Rocky Kolb and Rafael Alves Batista consider features of our theories that look unlikely or unnatural, and what our chances are for building a unified theory that explains them. Rocky Kolb, Rafael Alves Batista 12 Oct 2016
39 Why Now? We’re at a particularly interesting time in the evolution of the universe. Rafael Alves Batista and Rocky Kolb chat about the interesting features of our time, and why we should--or should not--expect to be living now. Rocky Kolb, Rafael Alves Batista 12 Oct 2016
40 Dark Matter Particles What sort of things could dark matter be, and how would we tell which it is? Rafael Alves Batista and Rocky Kolb review the main candidate dark matter particles, and consider our chances for telling which one is out there. Rocky Kolb, Rafael Alves Batista 12 Oct 2016
41 The Future of Dark Matter In the third part of their discussion, Celine Boehm and Justin Read mull over what we can learn from dark matter. Will understanding dark matter lead us to a small change in the standard model, or a large one? Justin Read, Celine Boehm 12 Oct 2016
42 How Does Dark Matter Act? In the second part of their discussion, Celine Boehm and Justin Read talk about how dark matter acts, both on large scales, at early times, and in small galaxies much nearer to us. Justin Read, Celine Boehm 12 Oct 2016
43 How Do We Find Dark Matter? In the first part of their discussion, Justin Read and Celine Boehm go over our evidence for dark matter and consider the possible particles that could make it up. Justin Read, Celine Boehm 12 Oct 2016
44 Dark Matter(s) Discussion Celine Boehm, Rocky Kolb, and Justin Read discuss fine-tuning in dark matter models, how we judge astrophysical parameters to be fine-tuned, how we get evidence for dark matter, supersymmetry, and our prospects for finding the dark matter particle. Celine Boehm, Rocky Kolb, Justin Read 04 Oct 2016
45 The Level of Fine-Tuning it Takes to Make a Dark Matter Model Dr. Celine Boehm (Durham) discusses the possible dark matter particles and the constraints--theoretical and experimental--on their parameter space. Celine Boehm 04 Oct 2016
46 The Decade of the Wimp Dr. Rocky Kolb (Chicago) discusses the theoretical reasons to expect dark matter to be a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), and the prospects for finding one. Rocky Kolb 04 Oct 2016
47 Astrophysical Probes of Dark Matter Dr. Justin Read (Surrey) explains the astrophysical evidence for dark matter, and our prospects for getting more information about its nature and interaction by looking at nearby dwarf galaxies. Justin Read 04 Oct 2016
48 The Jenkin Lecture - Engineering Tomorrow's Therapies Professor Constantin Coussios (Magdalen), Professor of Biomedical Engineering, gives the 2016 annual Jenkin Lecture, on 17th September 2016. Constantin Coussios 21 Sep 2016
49 Digital health Professor Lionel Tarassenko CBE FREng FMedSci (St John’s), Head of the Department of Engineering Science, gives a lecture for the department of Engineering Science Alumni Weekend on September 17th 2016. Lionel Tarassenko 21 Sep 2016
50 Creative Commons IDEAL and the FDA Regulation, Commissioning, HTA and Policy. Danica Marinac-Dabic 19 Sep 2016
51 'Light' Part 3 - How does sunlight damage DNA? Once we've received our genetic make-up from our parents our genomes are stable, right? What causes mutations in our DNA as we live and grow, and how do our cells repair damage? Catherine Green 03 Aug 2016
52 The merits of decision modelling in the IDEAL framework The case of innovative bilateral DIEP flap surgery. Janneke Grutters 03 Aug 2016
53 New Frontiers in Cosmology In the fourth part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock conjecture about future developments in cosmology. What part of cosmology is most likely to be fruitful? This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on May 12, 2016. John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
54 Dark Energy and the Multiverse In the third part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock consider approaches to dark energy. Should we accept the multiverse, or wait for a theory of quantum gravity? John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
55 New Data and New Work In the second part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock discuss possible future sources of data and developments in cosmology. They conjecture about the search for dark matter and its impact on astronomy. John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
56 New Statistics and Prediction In the first part of their discussion, Joe Silk and John Peacock compare approaches to statistics and how these bear on predictions in cosmology, including Weinberg’s prediction of the cosmological constant. John Peacock, Joe Silk 13 Jul 2016
57 Practical Fine-Tuning In the fourth part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan look for ways the fine-tuning problems can lead to advances in physics. Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
58 Comparing Theories In the third part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan puzzle over the way we compare theories, and whether there can be a theory that doesn’t have some unexplained posits. Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
59 New Approaches to Probability In the second part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan go over the difference between frequentist and bayesian statistics, and how this difference applies to astrophysics and cosmology. Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
60 What Is Fine-Tuning? In the first part of their discussion, Luke Barnes and David Sloan come up with a working understanding of fine-tuning. They also discuss various examples of fine-tuning in physics. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on May 13, 2016 Luke Barnes, David Sloan 13 Jul 2016
61 Creative Commons Evaluation of HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids A multicenter IDEAL study. Joey Kwong 07 Jul 2016
62 Creative Commons Perioperative Outcomes, Health Care Costs and Survival After Robotic-assisted Versus Open Radical Cystectomy A national comparative effectiveness study Bilal Chughtai 06 Jul 2016
63 Creative Commons IDEAL Framework and Recommendations A template for device evaluation? Christopher Pennell 06 Jul 2016
64 Creative Commons Applying IDEAL Early stage surgical innovation of a novel bio-wrap-assisted vasectomy reversal technique. Ahmet Gudeloglu 06 Jul 2016
65 Creative Commons Small Simple Trials A Strategy to Study Rare Surgical Conditions. James Wright 06 Jul 2016
66 Creative Commons Pilot and feasibility studies Methodological advances in evaluation. Gillian Lancaster 06 Jul 2016
67 Creative Commons An innovative view on surgical research Evaluation surgical innovation of international examples Maroeska Rovers 06 Jul 2016
68 Creative Commons Advancing the cause of Research Registration First 500 Registrations of the ResearchRegistry.com. Riaz Agha 06 Jul 2016
69 Creative Commons Mind the Uncertainty Gap A comparative analysis of HTA of robotic surgery. Tammy Clifford 06 Jul 2016
70 Is Buxton's Law still true? Evaluating evolving surgical techniques within pilot and full RCTs IDEAL surgical innovation in practice. Jane Blazeby 27 Jun 2016
71 Creative Commons Transforming transplantation Organ preservation and reconditioning. Peter Friend 27 Jun 2016
72 Creative Commons Is more evidence always better? The value of adding decision analytical modelling to the IDEAL framework Casper Tax 27 Jun 2016
73 Creative Commons Progressing through IDEAL: When is the right time to move from observational to randomised studies? A case study of REBOA. Jan Jansen 27 Jun 2016
74 Creative Commons Reconstruction of bladder defects with amniotic membrane Step 1-2 of IDEAL recommendations of surgical innovation David Barski 27 Jun 2016
75 Creative Commons Strachey Lecture - Quantum Supremacy Dr Scott Aaronson (MIT, UT Austin) gives the 2016 Strachey lecture. Scott Aaronson 14 Jun 2016
76 Creative Commons The developmental origins of health and disease: adaptation reconsidered Ian Rickard (Durham) places the origins of the science of health and disease within a framework of evolutionary theory and a medical anthropology perspective (18 January 2016) Ian Rickard 08 Jun 2016
77 Creative Commons Regulation of medical devices The application of the IDEAL framework through regulation, commission and policy. Art Sedrakyan 07 Jun 2016
78 Creative Commons Paving the Path for Human Space Exploration: The Challenges and Opportunities The 42nd Maurice Lubbock Memorial Lecture: ‘Paving the Path for Human Space Exploration:The Challenges and Opportunities’ presented by Lauri N. Hansen, Director of Engineering, NASA Johnson Space Centre. Lauri N. Hansen 01 Jun 2016
79 'Relationships' part 2 - New fathers How do new fathers form relationships with their children? What is the unique role of a father? What do they contribute to the development of their children? What is male post-natal depression? Anna Machin 22 Apr 2016
80 What Can We Learn from Planetary Surveys? In the fourth part of their discussion, Suzanne Aigrain and Michael Meyer discuss how we move from observations of exoplanets to conclusions about their types and formation. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
81 Is Our Solar System Special? In the third part of their discussion, Suzanne Aigrain and Michael Meyer discuss ways in which our solar system is unusual in its makeup and formation. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
82 Fine-Tuning and the Scientific Process In the second part of their discussion, Michael Meyer and Suzanne Aigrain talk about the way they, as working physicists, think of fine-tuning in complex planetary systems. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
83 Telescope Design and the Search for Life In the first part of their discussion, Michael Meyer and Suzanne Aigrain lay out the conditions for habitability on an exoplanet and challenges of looking for such planets. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Suzanne Aigrain, Michael Meyer 20 Apr 2016
84 Life in the Universe: Where and How Can We Find It? In the fourth part of their discussion, Mario Livio and Joe Silk talk about the way planetary systems form and the preconditions for life-bearing planets to exist. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016 Joe Silk, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
85 Testability, Physics, and the Multiverse In the third part of their discussion, Mario Livio and Joe Silk ask: could our theories exceed our ability to test them? Have they already? This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Joe Silkl, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
86 Biosignatures and the Search for Life In the second part of their discussion, Joe Silk and Mario Livio go over biosignatures: things which, if observed, would be evidence for life. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Joe Silk, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
87 Life in the Universe: The Fermi Paradox In the first part of their discussion, Joe Silk and Mario Livio consider the chances of life elsewhere in the universe. They talk about the Fermi paradox and responses to it. This discussion was conducted at Trinity College, Oxford, on February 12, 2016. Joe Silk, Mario Livio 19 Apr 2016
88 Shedding Light on the Situation Light is more than just light bulbs and sunshine! Researchers at the University of Oxford use different types of light to learn more about all sorts of interesting things. Jena Meinecke, Chris Rennick, Brianna Heazlewood, Clarence Yapp 12 Apr 2016
89 Dark Matter Oxford Students discuss Dark Matter. Aled Walker, Peter Hatfield, Fran Day, Talitha Bromwich 04 Apr 2016
90 Fundamental constants and biology George Ellis of the University of Cape Town shows how we can use a space of possibilities to assess the fragility of life. This talk was part of the Consolidation of Fine-Tuning Project's first workshop, "Life in the Universe", on November 3, 2015. George Ellis 02 Mar 2016
91 Are the Humanities More Digital than the Sciences? A panel discussion with Howard Hotson, Andrew Prescott, Dave De Roure and Heather Viles Howard Hotson, Andrew Prescott, Dave De Roure, Heather Viles 02 Mar 2016
92 Assessing Fine-Tuning in Physics: How Many? How Fine? How Come? Bernard Carr of Queen Mary University of London looks at sources of fine tuning in physics and their possible explanations. This talk was part of the Consolidation of Fine-Tuning Project's first workshop, "Life in the Universe", on November 3, 2015. Bernard Carr 02 Mar 2016
93 Too Valuable to Die? Silke Ackermann, Nigel Biggar and Liz Bruton debate the ethics of science and scientists going to war Silke Ackermann, Nigel Biggar, Liz Bruton 14 Oct 2015
94 Periodic Tales Author Hugh Aldersey-Williams, historian of science Jo Hedesan and chemist Peter Battle discuss the ways in which the elements continue to inspire us today Hugh Aldersey-Williams, Jo Hedesan, Peter Battle 13 Oct 2015
95 Painted by numbers: decoding Ferdinand Bauer's Flora Graeca colour code Lunchtime lecture by Richard Mulholland accompanying the exhibition Marks of Genius: Masterpieces from the Collections of the Bodleian Libraries. Richard Mullholland 09 Jul 2015
96 Creative Commons Simon Benjamin on Open Science Simon Benjamin, Associate Professor at the Materials Department, gives an in-depth talk on the importance of Open Science for researchers, students and the general public. Simon Benjamin 09 Jul 2015
97 'Artificial Intelligence' part 3 - Understanding how we learn language Professor Kim Plunkett explains how neuroscientists use artificial intelligence as a tool to model processes in the brain – in particular to understand how infants acquire language. Kim Plunkett 12 Jun 2015
98 Theatre and Evolution from Ibsen to Beckett An interdisciplinary discussion of Kirsten Shepherd-Barr's book Kirsten Shepherd-Barr, Michael Billington, Morten Kringlebach, Laura Marcus 20 May 2015
99 'Artificial Intelligence' part 2 - How to create machines that learn Professor Nando de Freitas explains that understanding how our brains work has helped us create machines that learn, and how these learning machines can be put to completing different tasks. Nando de Freitas 19 May 2015
100 Leviathan and the Air Pump: Thirty Years On The historian of science David Wootton reviews the controversial dispute between Robert Boyle and Thomas Hobbes, followed by a reply from Boyle's biographer Michael Hunter Ritchie Robertson, David Wootton, Michael Hunter 12 May 2015