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Medical Sciences Division

The Division comprises over 2200 academics and staff, 800 graduate students and 900 undergraduates; about 350 NHS Clinicians and GPs contribute to our teaching activities. In total over 2500 individuals are involved in research.
Medical sciences research at Oxford has maintained its pre-eminent standing, as demonstrated by the results of the 2008 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE). Analysis of the preliminary results published in December 2008 places Oxford medical sciences research as being of the highest quality in the UK in four separate medical science disciplines.

Series associated with Medical Sciences Division

Autoimmune Disease
Big Questions - with Oxford Sparks
Calleva Research Centre
Cancer
Cancer in the Developing World
Career Equality Talks
Children's Language and Literacy Impairments
Combined Medical-Surgical Grand Rounds
Crossing Boundaries
Diabetes and Obesity
Epidemics and Vaccines
Evidence-Based Health Care
Experimental Psychology Department
Genetics
Global Health
Health, Law and Emerging Technologies (HeLEX)
History of Tropical Medicine at Oxford
HIV
IDEAL Collaboration Conference 2016
Immunology
Inspiring Women in Science
Issues in Bioethics - Oxford Bioethics Network
Malaria
McMichael Symposium
Medical Sciences
NDM International Activities
NDM Public Engagement
NDM Units
Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences
Nuffield Department of Medicine, Meet our Students
OPDC: Progress in Parkinson's Research.
Oxford Biomedical Research
Oxford Sparks: bringing science to life
Psychiatry
Public Health and Epidemiology (Richard Doll Seminars)
Research Integrity
Research Topics in Biomedical Sciences
Revolutionary Biology
Surgical Grand Rounds Lectures
Tackling Health Challenges
The New Psychology of Depression
Thinking with Things: The Oxford Collection
Translational and Clinical
Translational Medicine
Understanding Alzheimer's and Dementia: Oxford ARUK Public Open Day
Vaccine Research at Oxford
Vaccines - From Concept to Clinic with Oxford Sparks
Weatherall lecture
Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics
Women in Medical Science
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Dementia, future treatments and research Prof. Klaus Ebmeier is the Foundation Chair of Old Age Psychiatry. In this interview he gives his point of view on dementia, normal aging and why new treatments are not yet effective. Klaus Ebmeier 21 Mar 2017
2 Will supersonic transport ever make a comeback? The Concord is seen as an iconic aircraft and a technological breakthrough – so why can we only see them in museums? In our episode of The Big Questions podcast series we visited Dr Neil Ashton from the E-Research Centre at the University of Oxford to ask Neil Ashton 13 Mar 2017
3 Prostate artery embolisation in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia and beyond Dr Mark Little discusses his ongoing research into the role of prostate artery embolisation within the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Mark Little 10 Mar 2017
4 Detecting, tracking, and predicting motor neuron disease NDCN Departmental Seminar. Martin Turner 06 Mar 2017
5 How do you turn an orange into a grapefruit? Favouring. It’s a global industry and here in Oxford a group of scientists are getting a ‘taste’ of the action by making natural flavours by manipulating enzymes. Alize Pennec 27 Feb 2017
6 The mesentery: congenital and acquired disorders of a new organ The finding of the mesentery opens up a whole new area of science. The colorectal surgery team talk about the importance of the mesentery and the disorders associated with it. Pamela Sivathondan, Kalle Landerholm, Diederik Meylemans, Bruce George 24 Feb 2017
7 Creative Commons Mapping bacterial antibiotic resistance Dr Olga Tosas-Auguet from our unit in Kenya tells us about her research on mapping bacterial antibiotic resistance Olga Tosas-Auguet 17 Feb 2017
8 Creative Commons Human factors based investigation of serious surgical mishaps Professor Peter McCulloch and Dr Lauren Morgan talk about investigating serious surgical incidents and how human factors science can help us. Peter McCulloch, Lauren Morgan 13 Feb 2017
9 Creative Commons The challenge of aortic therapy: stimulus to break new paths Professor Sebastian Debus introduces the variety of projects in his Department of Vascular Medicine, discussing the challenge of aortic therapy and the search for new solutions. Sebastian Debus 13 Feb 2017
10 Creative Commons Tracking infections Professor Derrick Crook from our Experimental Medicine division tells us about his research on tracking infections Derek Crook 10 Feb 2017
11 Creative Commons Bacterial infections in Laos David Dance from our LOMWRU unit in Laos tells us about his research on bacterial infections in Laos, particularly melioidosis David Dance 10 Feb 2017
12 Flow disruptors for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms unsuitable for endosaccular coiling Professor Byrne showcases the work of the Oxford Neurovascular and Neuroradiology Research Unit. Professor James Byrne is Professor of Neuroradiology at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford University. James Byrne 10 Feb 2017
13 Earthquakes, can we make smarter buildings? Major earthquakes across the world have damaged or destroyed numerous buildings, bridges, and other structures. But is there a way of monitoring the building structures to see if it is at risk of falling after an earthquake has struck? Orfeas Kypris 09 Feb 2017
14 Creative Commons Tracking infections Professor Derrick Crook from our Experimental Medicine division tells us about his research on tracking infections Derrick Crook 08 Feb 2017
15 Creative Commons Mapping bacterial antibiotic resistance Dr Olga Tosas-Auguet from our unit in Kenya tells us about her research on mapping bacterial antibiotic resistance Olga Tosas-Auguet 08 Feb 2017
16 Creative Commons Bacterial infections in Laos David Dance from our LOMWRU unit in Laos tells us about his research on bacterial infections in Laos, particularly melioidosis David Dance 08 Feb 2017
17 The impact of complications and errors on surgeons Mr Kevin Turner and Catherine Johnson talk about their national research study which aims to examine the nature of the impact that adverse events have on the professional and personal lives of surgeons. Kevin Turner, Catherine Johnson 31 Jan 2017
18 The Microbiome and the Brain An interview with Professor Phil Burnet, who discusses his research into the influence of the gut microbiome on brain health. He talks about novel findings, potential future work, and takes questions from trainee psychiatrists and researchers. Phil Burnet 30 Jan 2017
19 Rethinking the epidemic of overdiagnosis Overdiagnosis is the diagnosis of "disease" that will never cause symptoms or death during a patient's lifetime. Newer, more accurate technologies, and the desire to detect disease even earlier means Overdiagnosis is on the rise. Carl Heneghan 27 Jan 2017
20 What can a power ballad can teach us about the sex life of a fruit flies? Music provides the soundtrack to our lives. The highs, the lows and the heartache. So why wouldn’t it be the same for a fruit fly? On this episode of the Oxford Sparks Big Questions podcast, we mix music with sex education of fruit flies! Stuart Wigby, Sally Le Page, Eleanor Bath 27 Jan 2017
21 Lion Statue On whether there were ever lions in Egypt. Today, there are no lions roaming wild in north Africa, but evidence from ancient Egypt suggests that lions once did. David Whyte Macdonald 23 Jan 2017
22 Henry VIII Renaissance Medal On Henry VIII and the Founding of the Church of England Minted at London in 1545, this medal shows a bust of Henry VIII, with inscriptions in Hebrew and Greek on the reverse. Diarmaid MacCulloch 23 Jan 2017
23 Meissen porcelain chocolate cup and tea bowl On arranged marriages among royalty. Helen Watanabe-O'Kelly 23 Jan 2017
24 Arab robe worn by T. E. Lawrence On Lawrence of Arabia and wearing Arab robes. T. E. Lawrence, or Lawrence of Arabia was infamous for his scruffy appearance when in the British Khaki uniform, and wore it as little as possible. Eugene Rogan 23 Jan 2017
25 Silver-gilt carriage clock This travelling calendar carriage clock dates to 1747–1823. Why would such a clock need to have both lunar and sun time represented on it? With Professor Chris Lintott Astrophysics, University of Oxford. Chris Lintott 23 Jan 2017
26 Ennui by Walter Richard Sickert On Viginia Woolf's interpretation of Walter Sickert's painting of Ennui. Dame Hermione Lee 23 Jan 2017
27 Mummified Child On growing up and dying in ancient and modern populations. Sarah Harper 23 Jan 2017
28 Carved Stone Ball We still do not know why these stone balls were created. They date to the late Neolithic or early Bronze Age, between 3200 and 1500 BC. Marcus du Sautoy 23 Jan 2017
29 Portrait of Mademoiselle Claus by Édouard Manet Are Eastern Art and Western Art basically the same, and what is painting for? On Édouard Manet, Cézanne and their similarity to Chinese paintings. With Professor Craig Clunas Art History, University of Oxford. Craig Clunas 23 Jan 2017
30 Tombstone of a Muslim girl On what were people’s feelings about death and the dead in North Africa a thousand years ago? What does this tombstone tell us? With Professor Julia Bray, Arabic, University of Oxford. Julia Bray 23 Jan 2017
31 Creative Commons Resuscitating poor quality research Healthcare research is all too often plagued by biases that are rooted in poor methods, leading to the wrong result and conclusions and preventing uptake into practice. Carl Heneghan 17 Jan 2017
32 How do we stop our social media obsession from making us a target for crime? How vulnerable are we to crime by the statuses we post on our social accounts? Jason Nurse 17 Jan 2017
33 How do you make scientific equipment space proof? Since the 1960’s man has been sending missions to Mars. Some successes, some failures. This hasn’t stopped scientists trying to explore this incredible red planet. Colin Wilson 21 Dec 2016
34 Creative Commons Optimising malaria treatment Dr Georgina Humphreys coordinates the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) study groups by encouraging partner engagement and managing the data curation and development of publications. Georgina Humphreys 14 Dec 2016
35 Creative Commons Outbreak, the clinical research response Dr Gail Carson is Head of ISARIC Coordinating Centre (International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium), a network of networks established in 2011 to ensure a rapid research response to outbreaks of pandemic potential. Gail Carson 14 Dec 2016
36 Creative Commons Epigenetic modifications and cancer Professor Skirmantas Kriaucionis aims to to elucidate the molecular function of DNA modifications in normal cells and cancer. Skirmantas Kriaucionis 14 Dec 2016
37 Creative Commons Fighting malaria in Myanmar Professor Frank Smithuis is the director of MOCRU, Myanmar Oxford Clinical Research Unit. MOCRU involves a network of 6 clinics and 650 community health workers in remote areas. Frank Smithuis 14 Dec 2016
38 Creative Commons Optimising malaria treatment Dr Georgina Humphreys coordinates the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN) study groups by encouraging partner engagement and managing the data curation and development of publications. Georgina Humphreys 14 Dec 2016
39 Creative Commons Outbreak, the clinical research response Dr Gail Carson is Head of ISARIC Coordinating Centre (International Severe Acute Respiratory and Emerging Infection Consortium), a network of networks established in 2011 to ensure a rapid research response to outbreaks of pandemic potential. Gail Carson 14 Dec 2016
40 Creative Commons Epigenetic modifications and cancer Professor Skirmantas Kriaucionis aims to to elucidate the molecular function of DNA modifications in normal cells and cancer. Skirmantas Kriaucionis 14 Dec 2016
41 Creative Commons Fighting malaria in Myanmar Professor Frank Smithuis is the director of MOCRU, Myanmar Oxford Clinical Research Unit. MOCRU involves a network of 6 clinics and 650 community health workers in remote areas. Frank Smithuis 14 Dec 2016
42 What would life be like if Parasitoid Wasps didn’t exist? Our Festive episode of our Oxford Sparks podcast follows the traditional Christmas story of ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’. Christopher Jeffs 14 Dec 2016
43 Forty years on: from frogs to man Clinical Neurosciences Society Anniversary Lecture Chris Kennard 08 Dec 2016
44 Can bubbles help cure cancer? On this episode, can bubbles cure cancer? Eleanor Stride 02 Dec 2016
45 Bariatric surgery: new challenges Mr Bruno Sgromo talks about bariatric surgery (weight loss and metabolic surgery) and the new challenges that it brings to the bariatric team and the patient. Bruno Sgromo 30 Nov 2016
46 Why we work on Alzheimer’s disease Housed within the Target Discovery Institute, the Alzheimer’s Research UK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute (ODDI) juxtaposes drug discovery expertise alongside scientific and academic understanding of patients, disease mechanisms and model systems. John Davis 30 Nov 2016
47 Gastrointestinal cancers Dr Claire Palles studies whole genome sequencing data and targeted analyses with the aim of discovering genetic variants that affect susceptibility to colorectal cancer and Barrett’s oesophagus. Claire Palles 30 Nov 2016
48 Poor quality medicines LOMWRU researchers conduct clinical research to help improve global, regional and Lao public health. They focus on infectious diseases, and also investigate diseases of nutrition and poverty. Paul Newton 30 Nov 2016
49 Why we work on Alzheimer’s disease Housed within the Target Discovery Institute, the Alzheimer’s Research UK Oxford Drug Discovery Institute (ODDI) juxtaposes drug discovery expertise alongside scientific and academic understanding of patients, disease mechanisms and model systems. John Davis 30 Nov 2016
50 Gastrointestinal cancers Dr Claire Palles studies whole genome sequencing data and targeted analyses with the aim of discovering genetic variants that affect susceptibility to colorectal cancer and Barrett’s oesophagus. Claire Palles 30 Nov 2016
51 Poor quality medicines LOMWRU researchers conduct clinical research to help improve global, regional and Lao public health. They focus on infectious diseases, and also investigate diseases of nutrition and poverty. Paul Newton 30 Nov 2016
52 Creative Commons Are exhausts causing dementia? Many people are exposed to exhaust emissions every day in different ways. But what are the harmful effects of these fumes when we breathe them in? Could we see difficulties in other areas of our bodies? What is it doing to our brains? Imad Ahmed 21 Nov 2016
53 Ovarian metastases from gastrointestinal tract malignancy Mr Brendan Moran discusses cancer metastases to the ovary. Mr Moran is a general and colorectal surgeon at Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust. Brendan Moran 18 Nov 2016
54 Trials and Tribulations in Africa Dr Merlin Willcox gives a talk for the Evidence Based Healthcare series. Merlin Willcox 15 Nov 2016
55 Dealing with major trauma in developing countries – 20 years on Dr Douglas Wilkinson talks about trauma demand, trauma courses in developing countries, and global health in the 21st Century. Douglas Wilkinson 15 Nov 2016
56 Creative Commons How do you make a reliable weather forecast? Latest episode from Oxford Sparks, this episode on how to predict the weather. Hannah Christensen 04 Nov 2016
57 Creative Commons High altitude illness Director of OUCRU-Nepal, Dr Buddha Basnyat studies high altitude illness as well as undifferentiated febrile illness in the tropics, both common but neglected problems in Nepal. Buddha Basnyat 02 Nov 2016
58 Creative Commons High altitude illness Director of OUCRU-Nepal, Dr Buddha Basnyat studies high altitude illness as well as undifferentiated febrile illness in the tropics, both common but neglected problems in Nepal. Buddha Basnyat 02 Nov 2016
59 Creative Commons Infectious diseases in Indonesia Professor Kevin Baird leads our Eijkman-Oxford Clinical Research Unit (EOCRU) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Kevin Baird 02 Nov 2016
60 Creative Commons Finding the best malaria treatments Dr Mehul Dhorda heads the Asia Regional Centre of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN). Mehul Dhorda 02 Nov 2016
61 Creative Commons Evolution and pathogenicity of viruses Professor Peter Simmonds studies the epidemiology, evolution and emergence of a wide range of human pathogenic viruses. Peter Simmonds 02 Nov 2016
62 Creative Commons Infectious diseases in Indonesia Professor Kevin Baird leads our Eijkman-Oxford Clinical Research Unit (EOCRU) in Jakarta, Indonesia. Kevin Baird 02 Nov 2016
63 Creative Commons Finding the best malaria treatments Dr Mehul Dhorda heads the Asia Regional Centre of the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network (WWARN). Mehul Dhorda 02 Nov 2016
64 Creative Commons Evolution and pathogenicity of viruses Professor Peter Simmonds studies the epidemiology, evolution and emergence of a wide range of human pathogenic viruses. Peter Simmonds 02 Nov 2016
65 Better evidence for better health care Professor Carl Heneghan gives a talk for the MSc in Evidence-Based Health Care programme. Carl Heneghan 31 Oct 2016
66 Creative Commons Introducing Mesh: The Global Health Network's Community Engagement Webspace This webinar features introductions from Francois Van Loggerenberg, scientific lead at the Global Health Network, and community engagement consultant Georgia Bladon to the community engagement platform Mesh. Francois van Loggerenberg, Georgia Blazon 31 Oct 2016
67 Is my bacon sandwich really going to kill me? Statistician Dr Jennifer Rogers discusses the numbers linked to processed meat and bowel cancer. Jennifer Rogers 25 Oct 2016
68 CNS remyelination: from mechanisms to medicines NDCN Departmental Seminar Robin Franklin 07 Oct 2016
69 The Canary in the Coal Mine: could seabirds be the warning signs for our oceans? Dr Annette Fayet tells us about the Manx Shearwater; a little seabird that makes a huge journey. Annette Fayet 28 Sep 2016
70 Creative Commons X-rays for drug discovery Professor Frank von Delft works to ensure that X-ray structures can serve as a routine and predictive tool for generating novel chemistry for targeting proteins. Frank von Delft 23 Sep 2016
71 Creative Commons X-rays for drug discovery Professor Frank von Delft works to ensure that X-ray structures can serve as a routine and predictive tool for generating novel chemistry for targeting proteins. Frank von Delft 23 Sep 2016
72 Creative Commons Going Viral Viruses have been a threat to humanity for as long as we have existed. As we make progress in the fight against them, can we also learn to use their tricks to our own advantage Natalie Doig, Sandy Douglas, Peter Magill, Mary Warrell 23 Sep 2016
73 Creative Commons IDEAL and the FDA Regulation, Commissioning, HTA and Policy. Danica Marinac-Dabic 19 Sep 2016
74 Creative Commons The Montgomery ruling on consent: values and evidence in surgical care Professors Bill Fulford and Ashok Handa talk about values and values-based practice, and what this means in surgery. They then discuss the Montgomery Supreme Court ruling on consent and how this will change everyone’s practice. Bill Fulford, Ashok Handa 05 Sep 2016
75 Creative Commons Surgery for advanced rectal cancer – crossing the boundaries Mr Richard Guy and Mr Bobby Bloemendaal discuss surgery for advanced rectal cancer. Richard Guy, Bobby Bloemendaal 05 Sep 2016
76 Creative Commons Safer surgical services and human factors: two steps forward… Professor Peter McCulloch, Dr Lauren Morgan and Ms Lorna Flynn discuss patient safety and the work of the Quality, Reliability, Safety and Teamwork Unit (QRSTU). Peter McCulloch, Lauren Morgan, Lorna Flynn 05 Sep 2016
77 Creative Commons Rare events – unavoidable challenges and lessons to be learned Mr Radu Mihai and Dr Peter Hambly give a talk about rare/never events in surgery. Radu Mihai, Peter Hambly 05 Sep 2016
78 Creative Commons Non-technical skills for surgeons: a hard time for soft skills Professor George Youngson CBE discusses the non-technical skills (cognitive and social) that surgeons need in order to perform safely in the operating theatre. George Youngson 05 Sep 2016
79 Creative Commons Pre-hospital emergency medicine – recent developments and top tips for the first on scene Lt Col Ross Moy talks about the recent developments in pre-hospital emergency medicine and gives his top tips for the first on scene. Ross Moy 05 Sep 2016
80 Creative Commons Penicillin and the Legacy of Norman Heatley Dr Eric Sidebottom and Professor David Cranston talk about the story of penicillin and the legacy of Norman Heatley (1911 – 2004) who was a member of the team of Oxford University scientists who developed penicillin. Eric Sidebottom, David Cranston 01 Sep 2016
81 Creative Commons MiCollar novel iPhone application to analyse cervical spine motion restriction with different size and type of cervical orthoses Rose Ingleton 23 Aug 2016
82 Creative Commons The Visual Brain: 'The House of Deceits of the Sight' Lecture given as part of Brain Awareness Week 2016 Christopher Kennard 22 Aug 2016
83 Creative Commons Ethics of Surgical Innovation Explaining the views after being put into practice. Wendy Rogers 15 Aug 2016
84 Creative Commons Landscaping the future of coronary artery bypass graft surgery Mr George Krasopoulos talks about coronary artery bypass graft surgery and how we have improved over the years, and how the future is looking. George Krasopoulos 10 Aug 2016
85 Creative Commons Vascular trials, big data and dementia’ and ‘Community leg ulcer clinics and telemedicine Professor Alison Halliday presents ‘Vascular trials, big data and dementia’ and Professor Linda Hands presents ‘Community leg ulcer clinics and telemedicine’. Alison Halliday, Linda Hands 10 Aug 2016
86 Creative Commons Targeting the affective component of pain Professor Tipu Aziz and Dr Binith Cheeran talk about deep brain stimulation (DBS) for treating intractable pain syndromes. Tipu Aziz, Binith Cheeran 10 Aug 2016
87 Creative Commons Haemodynamic monitoring in the critically ill patient: current and evolving echo techniques Dr David Garry’s talk covers the theory underlying haemodynamic monitoring, how we have done it up to now and why echocardiography is a good way of doing it. David Garry 09 Aug 2016
88 Creative Commons Helping with breathing and eating – reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint Mr Nadeem Saeed talks about the temporomandibular joint, and about the reconstruction of that and why we reconstruct it. Nadeem Saeed 09 Aug 2016
89 Creative Commons HIV positive to positive transplantation: changing practices around the world Dr Elmi Muller talks about HIV positive donors for HIV positive recipients and changing transplant practices around the world. Elmi Muller 09 Aug 2016
90 Creative Commons Reflections on a retained swab Never Event in Churchill Theatres Dr Clare Dollery describes a retained swab Never Event that happened in the Churchill Hospital and reflects on how we respond and learn from it. Clare Dollery 09 Aug 2016
91 'Light' Part 3 - How does sunlight damage DNA? Once we've received our genetic make-up from our parents our genomes are stable, right? What causes mutations in our DNA as we live and grow, and how do our cells repair damage? Catherine Green 03 Aug 2016
92 The merits of decision modelling in the IDEAL framework The case of innovative bilateral DIEP flap surgery. Janneke Grutters 03 Aug 2016
93 'Light' Part 2 - Harnessing a single photon What's the use of just one photon, the smallest bit of light? And what does it take to study it? Joelle Boutari 27 Jul 2016
94 'Light' Part 1 - Connecting to the internet through your lights Can we receive information through our lighting? Dominic O'Brien 25 Jul 2016
95 Method in the Motion A unique evening combining a scientific talk with inspirational dance. Irina Pulyakhina, Flux 14 Jul 2016
96 Creative Commons Surgical Trainee Research Collaboratives in the UK An observational analysis of research activity and output. Angelos Kolias 12 Jul 2016
97 How can massive genetic studies help us prevent and treat diabetes? Any pair of individuals will share 99.9% of their DNA. But that 0.1% difference can tell us a huge amount about the causes of disease and how we can treat them. Find out more about the genetics that underpin type 2 diabetes. Mark McCarthy 11 Jul 2016
98 'Senses' Part 3 - Seeing across the galaxy How can you spot what's happening in space billions of light years away from right here on Earth? Garret Cotter 08 Jul 2016
99 Creative Commons Evaluation of HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids A multicenter IDEAL study. Joey Kwong 07 Jul 2016
100 Creative Commons Perioperative Outcomes, Health Care Costs and Survival After Robotic-assisted Versus Open Radical Cystectomy A national comparative effectiveness study Bilal Chughtai 06 Jul 2016