Over 4000 free audio and video lectures, seminars and teaching resources from Oxford University.
Skip to Content Skip to Navigation

Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS)

The Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS) Division is one of the four academic divisions of the University of Oxford. We have over 6,000 students and research staff, and generate over half of our funding from external research grants.
The MPLS Division's 10 departments and 3 interdisciplinary units span the full spectrum of the mathematical, computational, physical, engineering and life sciences, and undertake both fundamental research and cutting-edge applied work. Our research addresses major societal and technological challenges and is increasingly interdisciplinary in nature. We collaborate closely with colleagues in Oxford across the medical sciences, social sciences and humanities.
Today's scientific research not only crosses traditional subject boundaries, but also transcends national boundaries: MPLS scientists collaborate with researchers from around the world, and play leading roles in many international projects.

Series associated with Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences (MPLS)

A Mathematician's Holiday
Ada Lovelace Symposium - Celebrating 200 Years of a Computer Visionary
Algebra of Programming
Back Garden Biology
Big Questions - with Oxford Sparks
Building a Business: Moving Your Product to the Market
Caging Schrödinger's Cat - Quantum Nanotechnology
Careers in Chemistry: Academia
Careers in Chemistry: Beyond Academia
Chemistry for the Future: Clean Energy
Chemistry for the Future: Human Health
Chemistry for the Future: Incredible Machines
Chemistry for the Future: Meet the Scientists
Chemistry for the Future: Solar Fuels
Chemistry for the Future: Strange Substances and Structures
Chemistry Spotlight Lectures
Christmas Science Lectures
Computer Science
Cultural Heritage Forum
Darwin 200
Department of Engineering Science Centenary Lectures
Department of Engineering Science Lectures
Department of Materials
Department of Statistics
Earth Sciences
Enterprising Women
Exploring Spoken Word Data in Oral History Archives
Federated Logic Conference (FLoC) 2018
Good Natured
Hinshelwood Lectures 2018 - Soft Interfaces: A Journey Across Scales
Hinshelwood Lectures 2019 - Shedding New Lights to Light-Matter Interactions
Inside Oxford Science
International Conference on Functional Programming 2017
Mathematical Institute
Models of Consciousness
Musical Abstracts
Open Science
Oxford Physics Academic Lectures
Oxford Physics Public Lectures
Oxford Physics Research
Oxford Physics Short Talks and Introductions
Oxford Sparks: bringing science to life
Quantum Mechanics
Scientific Computing for DPhil Students
So you want to study Chemistry?
Stargazing
Strachey 100: an Oxford Computing Pioneer
Study Skills
Sutton Trust Chemistry Summer School
The Hinshelwood Lectures: Bioinspired Materials
The Medtronic Lectures in Biomedical Engineering
The Oxford Reproducibility School
The Oxford Solid State Basics
The Physics of Fine-Tuning
The Secrets of Mathematics
The World of Art
Theoretical Physics - From Outer Space to Plasma
Valentine's Day at Oxford
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Nature Notes: Searching for Red Squirrels in Tresco with Joe Woodman Join us for our very first Nature Notes mini-episode to hear from DPhil student Joe Woodman. You’ll get to hear all about his experience searching for red squirrels on the British island of Tresco. Joe Woodman, Sofia Castello y Tickell, Julia Migne 21 Jul 2021
2 Mathemalchemy: a mathematical and artistic adventure This lecture is a visual treat as Ingrid Daubechies celebrates the joy, creativity and beauty of mathematics. Ingrid Daubechies 19 Jul 2021
3 I is a Strange Loop - written and performed by Marcus du Sautoy and Victoria Gould From the creative ensemble behind Complicité’s sensational A Disappearing Number, this two-hander unfolds to reveal an intriguing take on mortality, consciousness and artificial life. Marcus du Sautoy, Victoria Gould, Simon McBurney 19 Jul 2021
4 Complexity of local MCMC methods for high-dimensional model selection Quan Zhou, Texas A and M University, gives an OxCSML Seminar on Friday 25th June 2021. Quan Zhou 02 Jul 2021
5 Assessing Personalization in Digital Health Distinguished Speaker Seminar - Friday 18th June 2021, with Susan Murphy, Professor of Statistics and Computer Science, Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Susan Murphy 23 Jun 2021
6 Machine Learning in Drug Discovery Graduate Lecture - Thursday 3rd June 2021, with Dr Fergus Boyles. Department of Statistics, University of Oxford. Fergus Boyles 23 Jun 2021
7 Several structured thresholding bandit problems OxCSML Seminar - Friday 28th May 2021, presented by Alexandra Carpentier (University of Magdeburg). Alexandra Carpentier 23 Jun 2021
8 A primer on PAC-Bayesian learning *followed by* News from the PAC-Bayes frontline Benjamin Guedj, University College London, gives a OxCSML Seminar on 26th March 2021. Benjamin Guedj 28 May 2021
9 Approximate Bayesian computation with surrogate posteriors Julyan Arbel (Inria Grenoble - Rhône-Alpes), gives an OxCSML Seminar on Friday 30th April 2021, for the Department of Statistics. Julyan Arbel 21 May 2021
10 Introduction to Bayesian inference for Differential Equation Models Using PINTS Ben Lambert, Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford, gives the Graduate Lecture on Thursday 6th May 2021, for the Department of Statistics. Ben Lambert 21 May 2021
11 On classification with small Bayes error and the max-margin classifier Professor Sara Van de Geer, ETH Zürich, gives the Distinguished Speaker Seminar on Thursday 29th April 2021 for the Department of Statistics. Sara Van de Geer 21 May 2021
12 Convergence of Online SGD under Infinite Noise Variance, and Non-convexity Murat Erdogdu gives the OxCSML Seminar on Friday 12th March, 2021, for the Department of Statistics. Murat Erdogdu 21 May 2021
13 Strachey Lecture: Getting AI Agents to Interact an Collaborate with Us on Our Terms As AI technologies enter our everyday lives at an ever increasing pace, there is a greater need for AI systems to work synergistically with humans. Subbarao Kambhampati 12 May 2021
14 Strachey Lecture: How Innovation Works: Serendipity, Energy and the Saving of Time Innovation is the main event of the modern age, the reason we experience both dramatic improvements in our living standards and unsettling changes in our society. Matt Ridley 12 May 2021
15 Fluid-gravity duality and hydrodynamics of black holes Holography explains why black hole horizons have thermodynamic and hydrodynamic properties and inspires researchers to re-visit foundations and explore limits of relativistic hydrodynamics Andrei Starinets, Julia Yeomans 29 Apr 2021
16 Hydrodynamics of Quantum Many-Body Systems Out of Equilibrium Can we apply hydrodynamics to systems with extensively many conservation laws Bruno Bertini 29 Apr 2021
17 Why Hydrodynamics? What is hydrodynamics and why does it apply over 20 orders of magnitude in energy and length. Steve Simon, Julia Yeomans 29 Apr 2021
18 Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture. Jon Keating: From one extreme to another: the statistics of extreme events Oxford University's Sedleian Professorship of Natural Philosophy is 400 years old in 2021. Jon Keating 28 Apr 2021
19 Spacetime Singularities - Roger Penrose, Dennis Lehmkuhl and Melvyn Bragg We are on board the Oxford Mathematics Space Probe for this Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture as we explore Black Holes with a Nobel Laureate, a Professor of the History and Philosophy of Physics & a broadcasting legend. Roger Penrose, Melvyn Bragg, Dennis Lehmkuhl 28 Apr 2021
20 Distribution-dependent generalization bounds for noisy, iterative learning algorithms Karolina Dziugaite (Element AI), gives the OxCSML Seminar on 26th February 2021. Karolina Dziugaite 17 Mar 2021
21 Finding Today’s Slaves: Lessons Learned From Over A Decade of Measurement in Modern Slavery Professor Davina Durgana, award-winning international human rights statistician and professor with almost 15 years of experience developing leading global models to assess risk to modern slavery, gives a talk on their work on modern slavery. Davina Durgana 01 Mar 2021
22 Veridical Data Science for biomedical discovery: detecting epistatic interactions with epiTree Bin Yu, Chancellor's Professor, Departments of Statistics and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, UC Berkeley, gives a seminar for the Department of Statistics. Bin Yu 26 Feb 2021
23 The Worm that Turned The species with the biggest biomass in any garden is almost certainly the earthworm. These humble denizens of our soil provide essential services by turning over soil and promoting plant growth. Lindsay Turnball, Peter Holland 08 Feb 2021
24 (Not) Aggregating Data: The Corcoran Memorial Lecture Professor Kerrie Mengersen, Distinguished Professor of Statistics at Queensland University of Technology in the Science and Engineering Faculty, gives the The Corcoran Memorial Lecture, held on 21st January 2021. Kerrie Mengersen 05 Feb 2021
25 Florence Nightingale Bicentennial Panel Session The Florence Nightingale Bicentennial Lecture was followed by a Panel Session with Professor Deborah Ashby, Professor David Cox and Professor David Spiegelhalter. The Panel was chaired by Professor Jennifer Rogers about the role of statistics in society Deborah Ashby, David Cox, David Spiegelhalter 05 Feb 2021
26 Creative Commons Seeing the Wood for the Trees (Part II) We take a walk around a local park to admire more winter trees and see why conifers win over broadleaved trees as we move further North, but even they have to drop their needles during the winter in the farthest reaches of the Boreal forest. Lindsay Turnball 25 Jan 2021
27 Strings and Fields Will strings be the theory of everything?, presented by Prof Luis Fernando Alday. Luis Fernando Alday 16 Jan 2021
28 Classical and Quantum Black Holes Prof March-Russell explains our latest understanding of black holes, some of the most mysterious objects in the Universe. John March-Russell 16 Jan 2021
29 Why is Quantum Gravity so hard? A pressing question in our quest to understand the Universe is how to unify quantum mechanics and gravity, the very small and the very large. John Wheater 16 Jan 2021
30 Florence Nightingale and the politicians’ pigeon holes: using data for the good of society Professor Deborah Ashby, President of the RSS, gives the 2020 Florence Nightingale lecture. Deborah Ashby, David Cox, David Spiegelhalter 07 Jan 2021
31 Creative Commons Seeing the Wood for the Trees In winter the bones of the trees are laid bare, giving us a chance to see their skeletons. Join Lindsay as she takes a tour round Wytham Woods in Oxford, showing you how to identify our common native trees from their bark and the shape of their branches. Lindsay Turnball 07 Jan 2021
32 Ideas for a Complex World - Anna Seigal Science and maths are full of smart tools for explaining the world around us. Those tools can feel far removed from the way the rest of us understand that world. Can we reconcile the two approaches? Oxford Mathematician Anna Seigal provides some answers. Anna Seigal 07 Dec 2020
33 Probabilistic Inference and Learning with Stein’s Method Part of the Probability for Machine Learning seminar series. Presented by Prof Lester Mackey (Microsoft Research New England and Stanford University). Lester Mackey 04 Dec 2020
34 Introduction to Deep Learning and Graph Neural Networks in Biomedicine Dr. Ekaterina Volkova-Volkmar, Senior Data Scientist, pRED Informatics - Data Science, Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Roche, Basel, Switzerland, gives a talk on deep learning and graph neural networks in biomedicine. Ekaterina Volkova-Volkmar 03 Dec 2020
35 Looking back on 4 years in data science Jonny Brooks-Bartlett, Senior machine learning engineer at Spotify, gives a talk on his experiences as a data scientist and as machine learning engineer in top rated companies around the world. Jonny Brooks-Bartlett 28 Nov 2020
36 Marine conservation with Angelique Songco Sofia and Julia talk to Filipina marine conservationist and diver, Angelique Songco! They end season 1 by discussing the evolution of Tubbataha Reefs Natural Park, the importance of working with different stakeholders to achieve conservation success. Angelique Songco, Sofia Castello y Tickell, Julia Migne 24 Nov 2020
37 Activism and Ecopoetry with Homero Aridjis On this episode, Sofia and Julia talk to Mexican ecopoet, activist, and ex-diplomat, Homero Aridjis! Homero Aridjis, Sofia Castello y Tickell, Julia Migne 03 Nov 2020
38 Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture: Henry Segerman - Artistic Mathematics: truth and beauty Mathematicians get up to all sorts. Geometers and Topologists in particular occupy a world of inconceivable shapes, concepts and dimensions. But how do you visualise such ideas? Sure, there's computer graphics, but what about over here, in the real world? Henry Segerman 02 Nov 2020
39 Mathematics Public Lecture: How Learning Ten Equations Can Improve Your Life - David Sumpter Mathematics has a lot going for it, but David Sumpter argues that it can not only provide you with endless YouTube recommendations, and even make you rich, but it can make you a better person. David Sumpter 02 Nov 2020
40 Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures: How to Make the World Add Up - Tim Harford You have to sympathise with statistics. Misunderstood and misused when all they want to do is accumulate. What they need is a little human understanding. Tim Harford's Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture does just that. Tim Harford 02 Nov 2020
41 Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture: Can maths tell us how to win at Fantasy Football? - Joshua Bull Oxford Mathematician Josh Bull won the 2019-2020 Premier League Fantasy Football competition from nearly 8 million entrants. So how did he do it? Did he by any chance use mathematics? Joshua Bull 02 Nov 2020
42 Creative Commons Black History Month: Exploring the Data Visualizations of W.E.B. Du Bois Jason Forrest, Director of Interactive Data Visualization, COVID Response Centre, McKinsey and Co, New York, gives the Department of Statistics Black History Month lecture, with a talk on the work of African-American scholar and activist W.E.B. Du Bois. Jason Forrest 23 Oct 2020
43 Rescuing rare plants with Carlos Magdalena On this episode, Sofia and Julia talk to horticulturist Carlos Magdalena, also known as the Plant Messiah. We talk about the importance of plants in our day to day life, ways to make people care about them more and his conservation work at Kew Gardens. Carlos Magdalena, Sofia Castello y Tickell, Julia Migne 24 Sep 2020
44 Crowdsourcing conservation with Meredith Palmer On this episode, Sofia and Julia talk to ecologist Meredith Palmer about the power of citizen science, the importance of inclusivity and some of the surprising discoveries her research has uncovered in the Serengeti. Meredith Palmer, Sofia Castello y Tickell, Julia Migne 07 Sep 2020
45 Combatting loneliness with Jessie Panazzolo Combatting loneliness with Jessie Panazzolo On this episode, Sofia and Julia talk to Jessie Panazzolo the founder of Lonely Conservationists, an online platform which supports conservationists. Jessie Panazzolo, Julia Migne, Sofia Castello y Tickell 26 Aug 2020
46 Creative Commons One billion years a slave Peering into a drop of pondwater allows you to look back in time and see key events in the history of life on Earth. Lindsay Turnbull, Stuart West 06 Aug 2020
47 Creative Commons Feed the birds? What do birds like eating and what decisions do they have to make when visiting a bird feeder? Lindsay Turnbull, Friederike Hillemann, Annette Fayet 28 Jul 2020
48 Theatre & Conservation with Tom Bailey This week Sofia and Julia talk to British theatre maker and director Tom Bailey about the ways he integrates conservation topics in his pieces, the inspiration behind his work and the importance of creativity to reach different audiences. Tom Bailey, Sofia Castello y Tickell, Julia Migne 27 Jul 2020
49 Sparking change with Purnima Devi Barman This week Sofia and Julia talk to Indian conservationist Purnima Devi Barman about her fight to protect the greater adjutant stork, the importance of involving women in conservation and the power of creating new traditions. Purnima Devi Barman, Sofia Castello y Tickell, Julia Migne 14 Jul 2020
50 Creative Commons Interview with a Vampire Find out how plants like mistletoe and hayrattle extract resources from their hosts and how hayrattle engages in a game of rock, paper, scissors, that makes managing meadows a whole lot easier. Lindsay Turnbull 10 Jul 2020
51 Creative Commons Much ado about mothing Dedicated to moths, this episode explores how and why these unsung heroes deserve more attention. Lindsay Turnbull, Doug Boyes, Ben Sheldon 30 Jun 2020
52 Saving species with Carl Jones On this episode, Sofia and Julia talk with Carl Jones, a Welsh biologist renowned for saving multiple bird species in Mauritius. Carl Jones, Julia Migne, Sofia Castello y Tickell 30 Jun 2020
53 The Science Media Centre and its work Fiona Lethbridge, Science Media Centre, gives a talk on the Science Media Centre and it's work. Fiona Lethbridge 24 Jun 2020
54 Empowering conservation with Megan Cromp In this episode, Sofia and Julia talk with the founder and CEO of Key Conservation, Megan Cromp. Key is a transformational new app that aims to help empower conservationists around the world. Megan Cromp 16 Jun 2020
55 Creative Commons Stop the pigeon? Never! Woodpigeons are common garden birds, whose familiar call has been likened to someone complaining about their feet. But woodpigeons make fantastic parents, and like all pigeons and doves produce a kind of 'milk' to feed their young. Lindsay Turnbull 15 Jun 2020
56 How To Set Up Continuous Integration to Make Your Code More Robust, More Maintainable, and Easier to Publish Dr Fergus Cooper, Research Software Engineer, Oxford RSE Group, gives a talk for the department of Statistics on 5th June 2020. Fergus Cooper 10 Jun 2020
57 Developing better code with automated testing Graham Lee, Research Software Engineer, Oxford RSE Group, gives talk for the department of Statistics on 22nd May 2020. Graham Lee 10 Jun 2020
58 Cluster-Randomised Test Negative Designs: Inference and Application to Vector Trials to Eliminate Dengue Nick Jewell, University of California, Berkeley School of Public Health, gives a talk for the departmental of Statistics on 28th May 2020. Nick Jewell 10 Jun 2020
59 MCMC for Hierachical Bayesian Models Using Non-reversible Langevin Methods Radford M. Neal (University of Toronto), gives a talk for the department of Statistics. Radford M Neal 10 Jun 2020
60 Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture: Squirrels, Turing and Excitability - Mathematical Modelling in Biology, Ecology and Medicine The Grey Squirrel invasion explaining tumour cell proliferation? Alan Turing explaining football shirt patterns? The close relationship between slugs and the human heart? What is the common link? Mathematics of course. And Philip Maini. Philip Maini 08 Jun 2020
61 Creative Commons All that glitters. Find out how birds, insects and plants exploit iridescence. Lindsay Turnbull 04 Jun 2020
62 Eco-anxiety with Caroline Hickman This week Sofia and Julia talk to climate psychologist Caroline Hickman about eco-anxiety, climate grief and the power of young climate activists. Caroline Hickman, Julia Migne, Sofia Castello y Tickell 02 Jun 2020
63 Creative Commons Three little birds Blue and great tits commonly use nest-boxes in gardens. In this episode we explore their nesting behaviour and get a priviledged view inside the nest-boxes at Wytham Woods. Lindsay Turnbull 29 May 2020
64 Oxford Mathematics 2nd Year Student Lecture - Number Theory: Primitive Roots In this, the second online lecture we are making widely available, Ben Green introduces and delivers a short lecture on Primitive Roots, part of the Number Theory Lecture course for Second Year Undergraduates. Ben Green 27 May 2020
65 Oxford Mathematics 2nd Year Student Lecture - Graph Theory: Shortest Paths Oxford has gone online for lockdown. So how do our student lectures look? Let Marc Lackenby show you as he looks at paths between vertices in a graph with a view to finding the shortest route between any two vertices. Works for your Satnav for example. Marc Lackenby 27 May 2020
66 Creative Commons Why is the world green? Lindsay searches for the truth about our verdant green world and tackles a mystery about her rose-bushes: who ate all the greenfly? Lindsay Turnbull 24 May 2020
67 Community conservation with Caleb Ofori-Boateng Welcome to Good Natured, a Conservation Optimism podcast, where you can join us for uplifting chats that shine a light on conservation challenges. In each episode, we interview an inspiring conservationist. Caleb Ofori-Boateng 20 May 2020
68 Smartphones v COVID 19 Smartphones will help save lives. Smartphones' value is exaggerated. What is the reality? And, as ever, what is the Maths behind it all? Leading Network Scientist Renaud Lambiotte downloads the facts in this Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture. Renaud Lambiotte 19 May 2020
69 Creative Commons Garden Safari: The Bug Five! Did you know that just five groups of insects dominate your garden? And can you tell the difference between bugs and beetles? Lindsey Turnbull 12 May 2020
70 Creative Commons Seeds of Change In this episode we take a look at the strange life-cycle of ferns and find out why they are so dependent on water. Lindsay Turnbull 10 May 2020
71 Creative Commons Hot as mustard. In this episode we look closely at Garlic mustard or Jack-by-the-hedge, a very common plant throughout the UK. Lindsay Turnbull 04 May 2020
72 Creative Commons One is the magic number Back Garden Biology takes a closer look at the insects in the garden including the solitary bee. Lindsay Turnbull 27 Apr 2020
73 Creative Commons Stinker! In this episode we look at the cuckoo pint, which has an unusual flower with the central part, called a spadix, releasing a stench that to our nostrils is quite revolting. Lindsay Turnbull 20 Apr 2020
74 Creative Commons Queen Bee Learn how to identify common garden bees and find out why they never seem to stay still. Lindsay Turnbull 20 Apr 2020
75 How do mathematicians model infectious disease outbreaks? Models. They are dominating our Lockdown lives. But what is a mathematical model? We hear a lot about the end result, but how is it put together? What are the assumptions? And how accurate can they be? Robin Thompson 15 Apr 2020
76 Creative Commons The Lillies of the Fields The beautiful snake's-head fritillary is the flower of Oxfordshire. In this episode we look closely at the flowers it produces. Lindsay Turnbull 13 Apr 2020
77 Oxford Mathematics 2nd Year Student Lecture - Differential Equations 2 Oxford Mathematician Peter Howell starts the second part of the 2nd year Differential Equations course which focuses on boundary problems. Peter Howell 09 Apr 2020
78 Creative Commons Deceived with ornament Plants attract pollinators through their colourful flowers but some plants aren't quite what they seem. Lindsay Turnbull 06 Apr 2020
79 Medicine and Physiology in the Age of Dynamics Medicine and Physiology in the Age of Dynamics: Newton Abraham Lecture 2020 Alan Garfinkel 02 Apr 2020
80 Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture: Alan Champneys - Why pedestrian bridges wobble: Synchronisation and the wisdom of the crowd So much noise, so many opinions. Perhaps time for Occam's Razor to start its scientific shaving? Alan Champneys 31 Mar 2020
81 Creative Commons Sex and the single primrose In early spring, primroses and cowslips can be found in many gardens and parks. Their yellow flowers are certainly beautiful, but they also hold a secret: they come in two different types that can only mate with each other. Lindsay Turnbull 26 Mar 2020
82 Machine learning techniques in modern quantum-mechanics experiments In this talk, Dr Elliott Bentine shall discuss how recent experiments have exploited machine-learning techniques, both to optimize the operation of these devices and to interperet the data they produce. Elliott Bentine 22 Mar 2020
83 Machine Learning and String Theory Professor Andre Lukas will discuss how string theorists have started to use methods from data science - particularly machine learning - to analyse the vast landscape of string data. Andre Lukas 22 Mar 2020
84 An Introduction to deep learning Professor Ard Louis gives a basic introduction to deep learning for physicists and addresses a few questions such as: Is the hype around deep learning justified, or are we about to hit some fundamental limitations? Ard Louis 22 Mar 2020
85 Welcome by Ian Shipsey Head of the Department of Physics Ian Shipsey give an update on the department and introduces the next three talk on 'AI in Physics'. Ian Shipsey 22 Mar 2020
86 Maths and Stats in Action – Real-time Analysis to Understand the Novel Coronavirus Providing a whirlwind tour of the quantitative analyses currently underway to understand the transmission and control of the novel coronavirus (2019-nCOV). Recorded on 31st January 2020. Christl Donnelly, Robin Thompson, Christophe Fraser 11 Mar 2020
87 Oxford Mathematics 3rd Year Student Lecture - Mathematical Models of Financial Derivatives Our latest student lecture features the first lecture in the third year course on Mathematical Models of Financial Derivatives from Sam Cohen where we hear that the role of derivatives is not to make money but to avoid being exploited. Sam Cohen 02 Mar 2020
88 Oxford Mathematics 1st Year Student Lecture - Linear Algebra II Our latest student lecture features the first lecture in the second term introductory course on Linear Algebra from leading Oxford Mathematician James Maynard. James Maynard 02 Mar 2020
89 Oxford Mathematics Public Lecture: Ian Griffiths - Cheerios, iPhones and Dysons: going backwards in time with fluid mechanics How do you make a star-shaped Cheerio? How do they make the glass on your smartphone screen so flat? And how can you make a vacuum filter that removes the most dust before it blocks? Ian Griffiths 26 Feb 2020
90 Enterprising Women: Lunch and Learn - Tara Sabre Collier Tara Sabre Collier shares insights into her work as a Global Strategist and Social Entrepreneur Tara Sabre Collier 25 Feb 2020
91 A Problem for Lambert Lecture at 65th Birthday Symposium for Lambert Meertens, 22nd January 2010 Richard Bird 24 Feb 2020
92 An Introduction to the Theory of Lists Lectures at Utrecht University, 16th and 17th December 1986. Richard Bird 24 Feb 2020
93 Oxford Mathematics Public Lectures - Carlo Rovelli  - Spin networks: the quantum structure of spacetime from Penrose's intuition to Loop Quantum Gravity Carlo Rovelli delivers The Roger Penrose Lecture on the Quantum structure of Spacetime. Carlo Rovelli 16 Jan 2020
94 IceCube: Opening a New Window on the Universe from the South Pole Particle Physics Christmas Lecture, hosted by Prof. Daniela Bortoletto, Head of Particle Physics and senior members of the department with guest speaker, Professor Francis Halzen. Daniela Bortoletto, Francis Halzen 20 Dec 2019
95 Oxford Mathematics Christmas Public Lecture: Chris Budd - Why does Rudolf have a shiny nose? From the unfairness of voting on TV shows to how Santa gets down so many narrow chimneys. Chris Budd take a mathematical look at the traditions of Christmas. Chris Budd 19 Dec 2019
96 Can one Define Intelligence as a Computational Phenomenon? Can we build on our understanding of supervised learning to define broader aspects of the intelligence phenomenon. Strachey Lecture delivered by Leslie Valiant. Lesley Valiant 11 Dec 2019
97 Jon Chapman - Waves and resonance: from musical instruments to vacuum cleaners, via metamaterials and invisibility cloaks Via guitars, clarinets and a musical saw to the noise reduction in a vaccum cleaner, Jon Chapman explains the role of waves in the sounds we hear and don't hear. Jon Chapman 02 Dec 2019
98 Oxford Mathematics 2nd Year Student Lecture - Quantum Theory Our latest student lecture is the first in the Quantum Theory course for second year students. Fernando Alday reflects on the breakdown of the deterministic world and describes some of the experiments that defined the new Quantum Reality. Fernando Alday 02 Dec 2019
99 Oxford Mathematics London Public Lecture: Timothy Gowers - Productive generalization: one reason we will never run out of interesting mathematical questions In our Oxford Mathematics London Public Lecture Tim Gowers uses the principle of generalization to show how mathematics progresses in its relentless pursuit of problems. Tim Gowers, Hannah Fry 27 Nov 2019
100 Oxford Mathematics Newcastle Public Lecture: Vicky Neale - in Maths Mathematics has no place for emotion, its practitioners are positively unemotional. True? Well, no. In fact 10 out of 10 untrue. Mathematics and mathematicians are also on the emotional rollercoaster. Vicky Neale is one of them. Vicky Neale 27 Nov 2019