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Humanities Division

The Humanities Division is one of four academic divisions in the University of Oxford, bringing together the faculties of Classics; English; History; Linguistics, Philology and Phonetics; Medieval and Modern Languages; Music; Oriental Studies; Philosophy; and Theology, as well as the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art.
The Division offers world-class teaching and research, backed by the superb resources of the University’s libraries and museums, including the famous Bodleian Library, with its 11 million volumes and priceless early book and manuscript collections, and the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology. Such historic resources are linked to cutting-edge agendas in research and teaching, with an increasing emphasis on interdisciplinary study. Our faculties are among the largest in the world, enabling Oxford to offer an education in Arts and Humanities unparalleled in its range of subjects, from music and fine art to ancient and modern languages.

Series associated with Humanities Division

"British" World War One Poetry: An Introduction
2013 Carnegie-Uehiro-Oxford Ethics Conference: Happiness and Well-Being
Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art lectures
Ancient Egypt
Ancient History HT2015: Digital Classics
Approaching Shakespeare
Art Across the Black Diaspora: Visualizing Slavery in America
Bio-Ethics Bites
Broadcast Media
Cantemir Institute
Censorship in Literature in South Africa
Centre for the Study of the Book
Challenging the Canon
Cultural Connections: exchanging knowledge and widening participation in the Humanities
D.H. Lawrence
Digital Humanities at Oxford Summer School
Diplomacy and culture at the Ottoman Court
Edward Lear's Feelings
English at Oxford
English Graduate Conference 2012
Euthydemus - Platonic Dialogue
Exploring Humanities - The Ertegun Scholarship Programme
Faculty of Classics
From Conscience to Robots: Practical Ethics Workshops
General Philosophy
George Eliot
Global and Imperial History Research Seminar
Global Poverty: Philosophical Questions
Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series, 2016-2017
Great Writers Inspire
Great Writers Inspire at Home
Greece in Crisis: Culture, Identity, Politics
Greek and Roman Drama - Theatre History and Modern Performance (APGRD Public Lectures)
History Faculty
History of Art
History of the Eighteenth Century in Ten Poems
Humanitas - Visiting Professorships at the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge
Hume's Central Principles
Ian Ramsey Centre for Science and Religion
Ian Ramsey Centre: The Deist Controversy
Ian Ramsey Centre: The Great Debate
Indian Traces in Oxford
Institute for Visual Research
Interviews on Great Writers
Interviews with Philosophers
Introducing the Qur'an
Introduction to David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature Book One
John Locke Lectures in Philosophy
Journal of Practical Ethics
Kant's Critique of Pure Reason
La Bella Principessa: A Leonardo Discovered
Leonard Woolf's The Village in the Jungle (1913): A Day Symposium
Les Liaisons dangereuses in 5x5
Literature and Form
Literature, Art and Oxford
Medea, a performance history (APGRD multimedia ebooks)
Medieval English
Medieval German Studies
Mesoamerican Manuscripts
Metaphor: Philosophical Issues
Modern Languages
MSt English Language
Musical Abstracts
Nietzsche on Mind and Nature
Not Shakespeare: Elizabethan and Jacobean Popular Theatre
Oriental Institute
Origins of Nature
Oscar Wilde
Oxford Humanities - Research Showcase: Global Exploration, Innovation and Influence
Oxford Writers' House Talks
Philosophical perspectives on the causes of mental illness
Philosophy - Ethics of the New Biosciences
Philosophy of Religion
Philosophy Special Lectures
Photo Archives VI: The Place of Photography
Poetry with Simon Armitage
Power Structuralism in Ancient Ontologies
Practical Ethics Bites
Promoting Interdisciplinary Engagement in the Digital Humanities
Reformation 2017
Reid's Critique of Hume
Religious Epistemology, Contextualism, and Pragmatic Encroachment
Renegotiations of History in light of the 'Greek Crisis'
Research Approaches to Former Soviet States: A Practical Introduction
Rothermere American Institute
Ruskin School of Art
Russian Ab Initio Students: Pre-Course Listening Material
Sacrifice and Modern Thought
Sade, l'inconnu? Nouvelles approaches critiques
Samuel Johnson
Science and Religious Conflict Conference
Shakespeare's first folio
Social Media and Faith
Spain: 1959 - 1992
Staging Shakespeare
Stories, Spaces and Societies - Globalising and Localising the Great War
Teaching the Codex
The Beazley Archive - Classical Art Research Centre
The Dragon and The Cross: Christianity in China
The End of Journalism
The English People at War in the Age of Henry VIII
The Fall of the Roman Empire (Bryan Ward-Perkins)
The King James Bible Lecture Series
The New Madhyamaka
The Remedy
The Trouble with Literature - Clarendon Lectures 2017
The Value of Humanities
The View from Above: Structure, Emergence, and Causation
The Zaharoff Lecture
Theology Faculty
Tolkien at Oxford
TORCH | The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities
Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics
Uehiro Lectures: Practical solutions for ethical challenges
Unlocking Late Schumann
Voltaire Foundation
Was there a Russian Enlightenment?
What is Tragedy?
What is Translation?
Writers in Dialogue
# Episode Title Description People Date
1 Teaching the Codex 5: Teaching Music Palaeography 2 Margaret Bent (Oxford) speaks at the 2017 Teaching the Codex Colloquium about music palaeography in the classroom. Margaret Bent 10 Apr 2018
2 Teaching the Codex 4: Teaching Music Palaeography 1 Eleanor Giraud (Irish World Academy of Music and Dance, University of Limerick) speaks about music palaeography in the classroom. Eleanor Giraud 10 Apr 2018
3 Photography and Tibet Author, Clare Harris, talks about her book on photography in Tibet - a place that has for centuries been a source of fascination for outsiders and a captivating yet troublesome subject for photographers. Clare Harris, Thupten Kelsang, Elizabeth Edwards, Geraldine Johnson 05 Apr 2018
4 Weeping 'He weeps by the side of the ocean, He weeps on the top of the hill', the poet wrote of himself in 'How Pleasant to Know Mr Lear'. Matthew Bevis, Jasmine Jagger 04 Apr 2018
5 Laughter Lear once spoke of 'this ludicrously whirligig life which one suffers from first and laughs at afterwards.' Matthew Bevis, Jasmine Jagger 04 Apr 2018
6 Disgust This programme explores appetite, desire, and disgust in Lear. Matthew Bevis, Jasmine Jagger 04 Apr 2018
7 Wonder This programme examines different meanings of 'wonder' in Lear - as both a positive and a negative emotion, and as something in between. Matthew Bevis, Jasmine Jagger 04 Apr 2018
8 Introduction This programme introduces Lear and outlines the structure of the programmes. Matthew Bevis, Jasmine Jagger 04 Apr 2018
9 Like, Elizabeth Bishop Professor of Poetry Simon Armitage delivers a lecture on the american writer and poet Elizabeth Bishop. Simon Armitage 20 Mar 2018
10 Creative Commons Creative Media Lecture 02 In the second lecture, Stig Abell discusses the future of modern and social journalism. Stig Abell 12 Mar 2018
11 Creative Commons Creative Media Lecture 01 In the first lecture, Stig Abell discusses the pros and cons of old fashioned journalism as well as modern forms of journalism such as social media. Stig Abell 12 Mar 2018
12 Modal Epistemology and the Formal Identity of Intellect and Object A defence of the Formal Identity Thesis and of the immateriality of the human intellect, based on specifically epistemological arguments about our knowledge of necessary or essential truths, including especially essential truths about value. Robert Koons 27 Feb 2018
13 Hylomorphism, natural science, mind and God Howard Robinson argues that the early moderns were right to think that Aristotelian or scholastic hylomorphism was inconsistent with modern science. Howard Robinson 27 Feb 2018
14 Dependent Powerful Qualities and Grounded Downward Causation David Yates argues that some physically realised qualitative properties have their causal roles solely in virtue of being the qualities they are, and not in virtue of the powers bestowed by their physical realizers on a given occasion. David yates 27 Feb 2018
15 A Biologically Informed Hylomorphism Utilising recent advances in developmental biology, Christopher Austin argues that the hylomorphic framework is an empirically adequate and conceptually rich explanatory schema with which to model the nature of organisms. Christopher J Austin 27 Feb 2018
16 Hylomorphic Structure, Emergence, and Supervenience William Jaworski argues why the hylomorphic structure is the best (and perhaps only) thing that can explain the persistence of individuals that change their matter over time. William Jaworski 27 Feb 2018
17 The Qur'an as literature A principal reason for why the Qur’an managed to establish itself as a text believed to constitute divine revelation is that it is compelling literature. How do Islamic and modern Western scholars approach the Qur’an’s literary dimension? Nicolai Sinai 27 Feb 2018
18 Confirming and Clarifying: The Qur'an in conversation with earlier Judaeo-Christian traditions The Qur’an’s original addressees must have been familiar with earlier Jewish and Christian traditions, which the Qur’an claims both to “confirm” and to “clarify”. Narratives about Abraham and the death of Pharaoh serve to exemplify what this means. Nicolai Sinai 27 Feb 2018
19 Rekindling Prophecy: The Qur'an in its historical milieu. This second episode examines the historical context in which the material now collected in the Qur’an was first promulgated. Special attention is paid to the various groups of addressees who figure in the Qur’an. Nicolai Sinai 27 Feb 2018
20 Hovering about the Qur'an without entering into it? On the academic study of the Qur’an. What does it mean to study the Qur’an historically? In this initial episode we consider how historically oriented research on the Qur’an relates to religious belief and to traditional Islamic scriptural interpretation. Nicolai Sinai 27 Feb 2018
21 A Celebration of the Centenary of the Birth of Olive Gibbs 100 years since the Representation of the People Act, the act which gave women the vote. Susanna Pressel, Liz Woolley, Bruce Kent, Simon Gibbs 26 Feb 2018
22 Ethnicised Religion and Sacralised Ethnicity in the Past and the Present An expert panel discusses the phenomenon of ethnicisation of religious identifications focussing especially on the nexus of religious, ethnic and national identifications in colonial, anti-colonial and postcolonial settings from Ireland to South Asia. Elisabeth Bolorinos Allard, Faisal Devji, Peter Leary, Ilya Afanasyev 22 Feb 2018
23 Valuing Women With Disabilities Valuing Women With Disabilities: Infantilised, Medicalised, Pauperised? Marie Tidball, Helen Brookman, Julie Jaye Charles 21 Feb 2018
24 Brain-machine interfaces and the translation of thought into action In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Dr Tom Buller reflects on the causal relationship between movement goals and bodily awareness and challenges the idea that BMI-enabled movement and intentional bodily movement are equal actions. Tom Buller 19 Feb 2018
25 Creative Commons Trade - Merchants' books of Venice and Florence Dr Irene Ceccherini (Lyell-Bodleian Research Fellow in Manuscript Studies, Bodleian Library, Dilts Research Fellow in Palaeography, Lincoln College, University of Oxford) gives a talk for the Seminar in the History of the Book on 9th February 2017. Irene Ceccherini 16 Feb 2018
26 James Joyce and the Phenomenology of Film Book at Lunchtime, James Joyce and the Phenomenology of Film Katherine Morris, Ulrika Maude, Jeri Johnson, Cleo Hanaway-Oakley 16 Feb 2018
27 Creative Commons Politics After God The 2018 Winant Lecture in American Government. David Sehat, Hal Jones 15 Feb 2018
28 Early Modern Publishing Policies - Andreas Frisius of Amsterdam and the search for a niche market, 1664-75 Professor Ian Maclean (All Souls College), gives the third seminar in the History of the Book series, looking at the early modern period publishing policies in Europe on February 2nd, 2018. Ian Maclean 06 Feb 2018
29 Creative Commons Collective inaction and group-based ignorance In this St Cross Special Ethics Seminar, Anne Schwenkebecher discusses morally wrongful collective inaction and the problem of group-based ignorance. Anne Schwekenbecher 06 Feb 2018
30 Arabic - Scrolls into codices: Jilyani's picture-poems for Saladin Professor Julia Bray (Laudian Professor of Arabic, University of Oxford) gives a talk for the new series for the Centre for the Study of the Book. Julia Bray 29 Jan 2018
31 Numismatics - Coins, Money and Prices in Renaissance Italy Dr Alan Stahl (Curator of Numismatics, Princeton University) gives a talk in the new Centre for the Study of the Book Seminar series. Alan Stahl 29 Jan 2018
32 A History of Algeria James McDougall presents an expansive new account of the modern history of Africa's largest country James McDougal, Eugene Rogan, Laleh Khalili, Robert Gildea 25 Jan 2018
33 Imagining the Divine: Art and the Rise of World Religions Mary Beard and Neil MacGregor in conversation undefined 24 Jan 2018
34 Research behind... Understanding Misunderstanding A podcast about a song about the parallels of fake news today and satire in the 18th Century based on research by Prof Abigail Williams at the University of Oxford Abigail Williams 09 Jan 2018
35 Research Behind... The Great Vape Debate A podcast about a song about vaping based on the latest evidence from research from Dr Jamie Hartmann-Boyce at the University of Oxford Jamie Hartmann-Boyce 09 Jan 2018
36 Research Behind... Stomach is the Monarch The research behind a song about how Victorians saw the conversation between the gut and mood, featuring an interview with researcher Dr Emilie Taylor-Brown at the University of Oxford Emilie Taylor-Brown 09 Jan 2018
37 Research Behind... Use the Digital to Make the World you Want to See The research behind a song about mapping the internet and how it links to our physical world, based on research by Prof Mark Graham at the University of Oxford. Mark Graham 08 Jan 2018
38 Research Behind... Mars Quakes The research behind a song about the quest to hear Marsquakes based on research by Dr Neil Bowles at the University of Oxford. Neil Bowles 08 Jan 2018
39 VoxPop 2: Christmas Episode 2 of VoxPop, the Oxford Classics Podcast Gail Trimble, Emma Searle, Jas Elsner, Dominic Dalglish 05 Jan 2018
40 VoxPop 1: Ovid 2000 Episode 1 of VoxPop, where we explore the works and influence of the Roman poet Ovid, 2000 years after his death. Qasim Alli, Marchella Ward, Oren Margolis, Jim Harris 20 Dec 2017
41 'Art and Attunement', by Professor Rita Felski, University of Virginia and Southern Denmark In this talk Rita Felski reported at new research on how we engage with works of art across a broad range (including cat videos) and considered the puzzling question of why we are drawn by some pieces of music, art and literature, and not by others. Rita Felski 19 Dec 2017
42 Becoming / Unbecoming With comics artist Una Una 18 Dec 2017
43 Creative Commons The Two Gentlemen of Verona Professor Emma Smith gives the last of her 2017 Shakespeare lectures on his early comedy, Two Gentlemen of Verona. Emma Smith 15 Dec 2017
44 Digital Rhetoric, literae humaniores and Leibniz's dream Willard McCarty, King's College, London, gives the 2017 Besterman lecture. Willard McCarty 13 Dec 2017
45 Unlocking the Church Book at Lunchtime, Unlocking the Church William Whyte, Dan Hicks, Julia Smith, Mark Chapman 11 Dec 2017
46 Late Victorian into Modern Book at Lunchtime, Late Victorian into Modern Laura Marcus, Kirsten Shepherd-Barr, Michael Bentley, Charlotte Jones 08 Dec 2017
47 Autonomy, Community, Destiny: Re-Imagining Disability The second seminar in the Disability and Curriculum Diversity series at TORCH Elizabeth Frood, Dom Hyams, Marie Tidball 07 Dec 2017
48 Work, Time and Stress: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives Stress & overwork in both education and professional life in the Victorian era and the 'dynamic' nature of disability and the impact of the stresses of modern life has. Sally Shuttleworth, Marie Tidball 07 Dec 2017
49 Core Course: Architects or Artisans? The Builders of the Medieval Cathedrals This lecture forms part of series entitled Introduction to the History of Art, a core course taught to the first year undergraduate History of Art students. Gervase Rosser 07 Dec 2017
50 Me and My Beliefs: Challenges of Identity and Society Me and My Beliefs: Challenges of Identity and Society held on 28 November 2017 Libby Lane, Jas' Elsner, Shaista Aziz, Elleke Boehmer 06 Dec 2017
51 Imagining the Divine: Art and the Rise of World Religions Book at Lunchtime held on 8th November 2017. Gervase Rosser, Georgi Parpulov, Stefanie Lenk, Kate Cooper 27 Nov 2017
52 Lecture 4: Literariness in Kant, Kierkegaard, and Coetzee The fourth lecture considers the work of Kant, Kierkegaard, and J.M. Coetzee. Victoria Khan 24 Nov 2017
53 Lecture 3: Milton and the Problem of Belief The second and third lecture focus on Thomas Hobbes and John Milton. Victoria Kahn 24 Nov 2017
54 Lecture 2: Hobbes and Maker's Knowledge The second and third lecture focus on Thomas Hobbes and John Milton. Victoria Kahn 24 Nov 2017
55 Lecture 1: Literature and Literariness The first lecture contrasts modern and early modern understandings of literature and literariness. Victoria Kahn 24 Nov 2017
56 Creative Commons The Materiality of the Divine: Aniconism, Iconoclasm, Iconography Professor Salvatore Settis, an archaeologist and art historian, presents a special lecture on the The Materiality of the Divine. Salvatore Settis 23 Nov 2017
57 The Hawks and the Doves – raptors and rapture in the poetry of Thom Gunn and Ted Hughes. Professor of Poetry Simon Armitage discusses the poems of Thom Gunn and Ted Hughes. Simon Armitage 15 Nov 2017
58 2017 Annual Uehiro Lecture (3/3) Obligations to the Needy: Some Empirical Worries and Uncomfortable Philosophical Possibilities In this final lecture, Professor Temkin considers possible negative impacts of global efforts to aid the needy, and reviews the main claims and arguments of all three Lectures Larry Temkin 13 Nov 2017
59 2017 Annual Uehiro Lecture (2/3) Obligations to the Needy: Singer’s Pond Example versus Supporting International Aid Organizations—Some Disanalogies and Their Normative Significance In this second lecture, Professor Temkin considers some disanalogies between saving a drowning child and giving to an aid organization, and discusses the issues of corruption and poor governance. Larry Temkin 13 Nov 2017
60 2017 Annual Uehiro Lecture (1/3) Obligations to the Needy: Effective Altruism, Pluralism, and Singer’s Pond Example In this first lecture, Larry Temkin explores different philosophical approaches to aiding the needy, and how they may fit with Peter Singer's famous Pond Example thought experiment. Larry Temkin 13 Nov 2017
61 Creative Commons The Fowler Lecture 2017: Fragmentations and Forgettings: (An)atomizing Classics in English Modernist Fiction David Scourfield The 2017 Fowler Lecture, delivered by Professor David Scourfield of Maynooth University. David Scourfield 13 Nov 2017
62 Creative Commons The Dream Colony: The Life in Art of Walter Hopps Deborah Treisman, Fiction Editor of The New Yorker, discusses the life and work of American museum director and curator of modern art, Walter Hopps, with visiting professor of American Art, Miguel De Baca Deborah Treisman, Miguel De Baca 13 Nov 2017
63 Sacred Values and the Sanctity of Life OUC-Ethox Seminar. Steve Clarke discusses Ronald Dworkin's account of sacred values in his work 'Life's Dominion' and furthers the argument that the assertion 'life is sacred' is tenable by both liberals and conservatives. Steve Clarke 13 Nov 2017
64 On Moral Experts A St Cross Special Ethics Seminar. Professor John-Stewart Gordon focusses on the question of whether moral experts must follow their own expert advice in order to remain experts. John-Stewart Gordon 13 Nov 2017
65 Creative Commons Henry VI, Part 2 Professor Emma Smith continues her Approaching Shakespeare series with a 2017 lecture on the early history play, Henry VI, Part 2. Emma Smith 09 Nov 2017
66 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Reasons to Worry The second of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 06 Nov 2017
67 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Conservatism, Temporal Bias, and Future Generations The last of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 06 Nov 2017
68 2015 Uehiro Lectures: Temporal Parochialism and Its Discontents The first of the three 2015 Annual Uehiro Lectures 'Why Worry About Future Generations'. Why should we care about what happens to human beings in the future, after we ourselves are long gone? Samuel Scheffler 06 Nov 2017
69 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 1: Consequentialism for Cows Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the first of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 06 Nov 2017
70 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 2: Deontology for Dogs Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the second of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 06 Nov 2017
71 2016 Annual Uehiro Lecture 3: Foundation for Frogs Professor Shelly Kagan delivers the final of three Annual Uehiro Lectures in Practical Ethics, ‘How to Count Animals, More or Less’ Shelly Kagan 06 Nov 2017
72 Representing the Dead Book at Lunchtime event Helen Swift, jessica Goodman, Philip Bullock, Neil Kenny 26 Oct 2017
73 Creative Commons The Merry Wives of Windsor Professor Emma Smith lectures on Shakespeare’s The Merry Wives of Windsor. Emma Smith 25 Oct 2017
74 Creative Commons All's Well That Ends Well Professor Emma Smith lectures on Shakespeare’s comedy All's Well That Ends Well. Emma Smith 25 Oct 2017
75 Creative Commons Cymbeline Professor Emma Smith continues her Approaching Shakespeare series with a lecture on one of Shakespeare’s later plays, Cymbeline. Emma Smith 25 Oct 2017
76 Hidden Beneath the Surface: Untold Tales of Neurodivergence and Mental Difference in Oxford World Mental Health Day 2017 Dan Holloway, Miranda Reilly, Sonia Boue, Marie Tidball 18 Oct 2017
77 Marsquakes A song about the quest to hear Marsquakes based on research by Dr Neil Bowles at the University of Oxford Neil Bowles 16 Oct 2017
78 Understanding Misunderstanding A song about the parallels of fake news today and satire in the 18th Century based on research by Prof Abigail Williams at the University of Oxford Abigail Williams 16 Oct 2017
79 The Great Vape Debate A song about vaping based on the latest evidence from research, from Dr Jamie Hartmann-Boyce at the University of Oxford Jamie Hartmann-Boyce 16 Oct 2017
80 Stomach is the Monarch A song about how Victorians saw the conversation between the gut and mood, based on research by Dr Emilie Taylor-Brown at the University of Oxford Emilie Taylor-Brown 16 Oct 2017
81 Use the Digital to Make the World you Want to See A song about mapping the internet and how it links to our physical world, based on research by Prof Mark Graham at the University of Oxford. Mark Graham 16 Oct 2017
82 Creative Commons Music and Morale in the British Army, 1914-1918 Dr Emma Hanna (University of Kent) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Emma Hanna 12 Sep 2017
83 Creative Commons From Bandage Wallahs to Knights of the Red Cross: The Men of the Royal Army Medical Corps in the First World War Dr Jessica Meyer (Leeds) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Jessica Meyer 12 Sep 2017
84 Creative Commons Ego-Documents and Official History: Crown Prince Rupprecht of Bavaria's Diary and the Battle for Memory, 1914-39 Dr Jonathan Boff (University of Birmingham) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Jonathan Boff 12 Sep 2017
85 Creative Commons The Fortress: A Case Study of Total War in the East, 1914-15 Professor Alexander Watson (Goldsmith's University) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Alexander Watson 12 Sep 2017
86 Creative Commons Enmity or empathy? Jacques Rivière's L'Allemand Dr Arabella Hobbs (University of Pennsylvania) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Arabella Hobbs 12 Sep 2017
87 Creative Commons Kde domov muj and Wacht am Rhein: Singing Loyalty and Disloyalty in Habsburg Bohemia during the First World War Dr Tamara Scheer (Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute for Historical Social Science/Institute for East European History, University of Vienna) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Tamara Scheer 12 Sep 2017
88 Creative Commons Rescuing Maritime Strategy from the Continental Commitment: Julian Corbett's analysis of Gallipoli and Jutland in the Official History of Naval Operations Professor Andrew Lambert (King’s College London), gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Andrew Lambert 12 Sep 2017
89 Creative Commons Scholarly identities in war and peace: the Paris Peace Conference and the mobilization of intellect Dr Tomás Irish (Swansea University), gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Tomás Irish 12 Sep 2017
90 Creative Commons Victorious in name only: The Portuguese Republic and its empire at war, 1916-1918 Professor Filipe Ribeiro de Meneses (Maynooth University), gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Filipe Ribeiro de Meneses 12 Sep 2017
91 Creative Commons Tabriz under two rival empires: Ottomans and Russians during the Great War Fatemeh Masjedi (Zentrum Moderner Orient) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series. Fatemeh Masjedi 12 Sep 2017
92 Unflattening With Nick Sousanis Nick Sousanis, Dominic Davies, Segolene Tarte 05 Sep 2017
93 Disaster Drawn: Comics and Picturing Violence Keynote lecture by Hilary Chute as part of the Documenting Trauma conference. Hilary Chute 05 Sep 2017
94 Selma Dabbagh and Courttia Newland on writing and community Writers Selma Dabbagh and Courttia Newland read from their work, and discuss why they write, who they write for, their imagined audiences, and how their writing relates to their identities. Selma Dabbagh, Courttia Newland 25 Aug 2017
95 M. NourbeSe Philip on the haunting of history M. NourbeSe Philip reads from She Tries Her Tongue, Her Silence Softly Breaks (1988) and Zong! (2008) as she describes her poetic development. M NourbeSe Philip, Marina Warner, Matthew Reynolds, Elleke Boehmer 25 Aug 2017
96 Editors and contributors, The Cambridge History of Black and Asian British Writing Profs Susheila Nasta and Mark Stein speak about the genesis of their new Cambridge History project, Dr Gail Low discusses the networks and institutions of Caribbean-British writing. Susheila Nasta, Mark Stein, Gail Low, Henghameh Saroukhani 25 Aug 2017
97 Aminatta Forna on writing memory and trauma in The Memory of Love Aminatta Forna gives a reading from her award-winning novel, The Memory of Love (2010), and discusses it with Prof. Ankhi Mukherjee. She talks about the psychology of war and healing after conflict, and about love, betrayal and complicity. Aminatta Forna, Ankhi Mukherjee 25 Aug 2017
98 Nadifa Mohamed on travelling, home and belonging in Black Mamba Boy Nadifa Mohamed reads from and discusses her debut novel, Black Mamba Boy (2010), based on her father’s travels across the Horn of Africa before settling in Britain. Nadifa Mohamed, Kate Wallis 25 Aug 2017
99 D-Empress Dianne Regisford presents ‘Hersto-rhetoric? Na so today!!!’ D-Empress Dianne Regisford presents a performance installation that explores the notion of the liberated woman from an African feminist perspective. D-Empress Dianne Regisford, Rev J, Erica Lombard 25 Aug 2017
100 Daljit Nagra on voice and identity in Look We Have Coming to Dover! Daljit Nagra reads from and discusses his celebrated debut collection, Look We Have Coming to Dover! (2007). In conversation with Dr Rachael Gilmour and the audience, he speaks about how and why he writes his poetry, and the readers for whom he writes. Daljit Nagra, Rachael Gilmour 25 Aug 2017